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High Performance JavaScript

Cover of High Performance JavaScript by Nicholas C. Zakas Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. High Performance JavaScript
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Preface
      1. The Internet Evolves
      2. Why Optimization Is Necessary
      3. Next-Generation JavaScript Engines
      4. Performance Is Still a Concern
      5. How This Book Is Organized
      6. JavaScript Loading
      7. Coding Technique
      8. Deployment
      9. Testing
      10. Who This Book Is For
      11. Conventions Used in This Book
      12. Using Code Examples
      13. Safari® Books Online
      14. How to Contact Us
      15. Acknowledgments
    3. 1. Loading and Execution
      1. Script Positioning
      2. Grouping Scripts
      3. Nonblocking Scripts
      4. Summary
    4. 2. Data Access
      1. Managing Scope
      2. Object Members
      3. Summary
    5. 3. DOM Scripting
      1. DOM in the Browser World
      2. DOM Access and Modification
      3. Repaints and Reflows
      4. Event Delegation
      5. Summary
    6. 4. Algorithms and Flow Control
      1. Loops
      2. Conditionals
      3. Recursion
      4. Summary
    7. 5. Strings and Regular Expressions
      1. String Concatenation
      2. Regular Expression Optimization
      3. String Trimming
      4. Summary
    8. 6. Responsive Interfaces
      1. The Browser UI Thread
      2. Yielding with Timers
      3. Web Workers
      4. Summary
    9. 7. Ajax
      1. Data Transmission
      2. Data Formats
      3. Ajax Performance Guidelines
      4. Summary
    10. 8. Programming Practices
      1. Avoid Double Evaluation
      2. Use Object/Array Literals
      3. Don’t Repeat Work
      4. Use the Fast Parts
      5. Summary
    11. 9. Building and Deploying High-Performance JavaScript Applications
      1. Apache Ant
      2. Combining JavaScript Files
      3. Preprocessing JavaScript Files
      4. JavaScript Minification
      5. Buildtime Versus Runtime Build Processes
      6. JavaScript Compression
      7. Caching JavaScript Files
      8. Working Around Caching Issues
      9. Using a Content Delivery Network
      10. Deploying JavaScript Resources
      11. Agile JavaScript Build Process
      12. Summary
    12. 10. Tools
      1. JavaScript Profiling
      2. YUI Profiler
      3. Anonymous Functions
      4. Firebug
      5. Internet Explorer Developer Tools
      6. Safari Web Inspector
      7. Chrome Developer Tools
      8. Script Blocking
      9. Page Speed
      10. Fiddler
      11. YSlow
      12. dynaTrace Ajax Edition
      13. Summary
    13. Index
    14. About the Author
    15. Colophon
    16. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly

Use the Fast Parts

Even though JavaScript is often blamed for being slow, there are parts of the language that are incredibly fast. This should come as no surprise, since JavaScript engines are built in lower-level languages and are therefore compiled. Though it’s easy to blame the engine when JavaScript appears slow, the engine is typically the fastest part of the process; it’s your code that is actually running slowly. There are parts of the engine that are much faster than others because they allow you to bypass the slow parts.

Bitwise Operators

Bitwise operators are one of the most frequently misunderstood aspects of JavaScript. General opinion is that developers don’t understand how to use these operators and frequently mistake them for their Boolean equivalents. As a result, bitwise operators are used infrequently in JavaScript development, despite their advantages.

JavaScript numbers are all stored in IEEE-754 64-bit format. For bitwise operations, though, the number is converted into a signed 32-bit representation. Each operator then works directly on this 32-bit representation to achieve a result. Despite the conversion, this process is incredibly fast when compared to other mathematical and Boolean operations in JavaScript.

If you’re unfamiliar with binary representation of numbers, JavaScript makes it easy to convert a number into a string containing its binary equivalent by using the toString() method and passing in the number 2. For example:

var num1 = 25, num2 = 3; alert(num1.toString(2)); ...

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