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High Performance JavaScript

Cover of High Performance JavaScript by Nicholas C. Zakas Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. High Performance JavaScript
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Preface
      1. The Internet Evolves
      2. Why Optimization Is Necessary
      3. Next-Generation JavaScript Engines
      4. Performance Is Still a Concern
      5. How This Book Is Organized
      6. JavaScript Loading
      7. Coding Technique
      8. Deployment
      9. Testing
      10. Who This Book Is For
      11. Conventions Used in This Book
      12. Using Code Examples
      13. Safari® Books Online
      14. How to Contact Us
      15. Acknowledgments
    3. 1. Loading and Execution
      1. Script Positioning
      2. Grouping Scripts
      3. Nonblocking Scripts
      4. Summary
    4. 2. Data Access
      1. Managing Scope
      2. Object Members
      3. Summary
    5. 3. DOM Scripting
      1. DOM in the Browser World
      2. DOM Access and Modification
      3. Repaints and Reflows
      4. Event Delegation
      5. Summary
    6. 4. Algorithms and Flow Control
      1. Loops
      2. Conditionals
      3. Recursion
      4. Summary
    7. 5. Strings and Regular Expressions
      1. String Concatenation
      2. Regular Expression Optimization
      3. String Trimming
      4. Summary
    8. 6. Responsive Interfaces
      1. The Browser UI Thread
      2. Yielding with Timers
      3. Web Workers
      4. Summary
    9. 7. Ajax
      1. Data Transmission
      2. Data Formats
      3. Ajax Performance Guidelines
      4. Summary
    10. 8. Programming Practices
      1. Avoid Double Evaluation
      2. Use Object/Array Literals
      3. Don’t Repeat Work
      4. Use the Fast Parts
      5. Summary
    11. 9. Building and Deploying High-Performance JavaScript Applications
      1. Apache Ant
      2. Combining JavaScript Files
      3. Preprocessing JavaScript Files
      4. JavaScript Minification
      5. Buildtime Versus Runtime Build Processes
      6. JavaScript Compression
      7. Caching JavaScript Files
      8. Working Around Caching Issues
      9. Using a Content Delivery Network
      10. Deploying JavaScript Resources
      11. Agile JavaScript Build Process
      12. Summary
    12. 10. Tools
      1. JavaScript Profiling
      2. YUI Profiler
      3. Anonymous Functions
      4. Firebug
      5. Internet Explorer Developer Tools
      6. Safari Web Inspector
      7. Chrome Developer Tools
      8. Script Blocking
      9. Page Speed
      10. Fiddler
      11. YSlow
      12. dynaTrace Ajax Edition
      13. Summary
    13. Index
    14. About the Author
    15. Colophon
    16. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly

Yielding with Timers

Despite your best efforts, there will be times when a JavaScript task cannot be completed in 100 milliseconds or less because of its complexity. In these cases, it’s ideal to yield control of the UI thread so that UI updates may occur. Yielding control means stopping JavaScript execution and giving the UI a chance to update itself before continuing to execute the JavaScript. This is where JavaScript timers come into the picture.

Timer Basics

Timers are created in JavaScript using either setTimeout() or setInterval(), and both accept the same arguments: a function to execute and the amount of time to wait (in milliseconds) before executing it. The setTimeout() function creates a timer that executes just once, whereas the setInterval() function creates a timer that repeats periodically.

The way that timers interact with the UI thread is helpful for breaking up long-running scripts into shorter segments. Calling setTimeout() or setInterval() tells the JavaScript engine to wait a certain amount of time and then add a JavaScript task to the UI queue. For example:

function greeting(){
    alert("Hello world!");

setTimeout(greeting, 250);

This code inserts a JavaScript task to execute the greeting() function into the UI queue after 250 milliseconds have passed. Prior to that point, all other UI updates and JavaScript tasks are executed. Keep in mind that the second argument indicates when the task should be added to the UI queue, which is not necessarily the time that it ...

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