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Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics: Research and Practices

Book Description

Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics: Research and Practices compiles estimable knowledge on the research of information systems and informatics applications in the healthcare industry. This book addresses organizational issues, including technology adoption, diffusion, and acceptance, as well as cost benefits and cost effectiveness, of advancing health information systems and informatics applications as innovative forms of investment in healthcare. Rapidly changing technology and the complexity of its applications make this book an invaluable resource to researchers and practitioners in the healthcare fields.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
  3. I. HISI Theoretical Development
    1. I. Designing a M-Health Framework for Conceptualizing Mobile Health Systems
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Background of M-Health
      4. Mobile Healthcare Delivery System Networks
      5. The M-Health Reference Model
        1. Mobile Communication Infrastructure
        2. Device Type
        3. Data Display
        4. Application Purpose
        5. Application Area
      6. Overview of Blood Donor Recruitment (BDR) Project
      7. Conclusion
      8. References
    2. II. Factors Motivating the Acceptance of New Information and Communication Technologies in UK Healthcare: A Test of Three Models
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Public Healthcare in the UK: An Overview
        1. National Programme for IT (Formerly NPfit)
      4. Development of Research Model
        1. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)
        2. The Triandis Theory of Interpersonal Behaviour
        3. Rogers Innovation and Diffusion Theory
        4. Reasons Behind Integration
          1. Incompleteness
          2. Similarities Between the Models
      5. An Integrative Model
        1. Social Factors
        2. Perceived Usefulness
        3. Perceived Ease of Use
        4. Facilitating Conditions
        5. Perceived Consequences
        6. Relative Advantage
        7. Trialability/Experience
        8. Intention
        9. Attitude
        10. Compatibility
      6. Discussion
      7. References
    3. III. An Overview of the HIPAA-Compliant Privacy Access Control Model
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
        1. An Overview of Personal Health Information Privacy Legislations
        2. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
        3. Legislative Principles for Achieving Healthcare Privacy
          1. Principle 1: Data-Level Security Protection Principle
          2. Principle 2: Communication-Level Security Protection Principle
          3. Principle 3: Consent Requirement Principle
      3. A Privacy Access Control Model for E-Healthcare Applications
      4. Implementation in Web Services
        1. Preliminary Requirements
        2. E-Healthcare Privacy Legislation Compliance Architecture
          1. Communication Security Layer
          2. E-Healthcare Privacy Policy Layer
          3. Healthcare Specific Vocabularies Layer
      5. Discussion and Conclusion
      6. References
  4. II. HISI Methodological Approaches
    1. IV. The Internet and Managing Boomers and Seniors' Health
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction and Background
      3. Literature Review
        1. Online Health Information and Managing Boomers' and Seniors' Health
        2. Boomers' and Seniors' Differences
          1. Health of Boomers and Seniors
        3. Online Proficiency
        4. Sociodemographic Characteristics of Online Health Seekers
        5. Awareness and Feelings Towards Online Health Resources
      4. Hypotheses
      5. Dataset and Methods
      6. Descriptive Statistics of Boomers and Seniors and Online Health Information
        1. Dependent Variables
        2. Predictor Variables
      7. Results of Logistic Regression Models of Online Health Information Managing Health
      8. Discussion of Results and Hypotheses
      9. Recommendations, Limitations, and Future Research
      10. References
      11. Endnotes
    2. V. Data Mining Medical Information: Should Artificial Neural Networks be Used to Analyze Trauma Audit Data
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
        1. Trauma Audit and Research Network
      3. Method
      4. Results
      5. Discussion and Conclusion
        1. Implications for Practice
        2. Comparison with Logistic Regression
        3. Concluding Remarks
      6. References
    3. VI. Diagnostic Cost Reduction Using Artificial Neural Networks: The Case of Pulmonary Embolism
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Background
        1. Diagnostic Difficulties of PE
        2. Neural Networks in Medicine
        3. Neural Network Design Issues
      4. Methodology: An ANN Model for Diagnosing PE
        1. Research Population Description
        2. ANN Design of a PE Diagnosis Model
      5. Results and Discussion
      6. Conclusion
      7. References
      8. Endnotes
    4. VII. Information Technology in Primary Care Practice in the United States
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Methods
        1. Survey Method
        2. Survey Design
        3. Sample
      4. Results
        1. Use of Information Technology
        2. Perceived Benefits and Barriers
        3. Predictors of IT Implementation
      5. Discussion
      6. Conclusion
      7. Acknowledgment
      8. References
      9. Appendix
      10. Internet Tools
      11. Barriers to Implementation
    5. VIII. A Case Study of Health Information Systems Adoption: An Adaptive Structuration Theory Approach
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Literature Review
      4. Research Model
        1. Advanced Information Technology Structure
        2. External Sources of Structure
        3. Internal Sources of Structure
        4. Technology Application
          1. Appropriation of Structures
          2. Business Processes
        5. Technology Process Outcomes
      5. Research Method
      6. Results
      7. Discussion
      8. Conclusion
      9. References
    6. IX. Understanding Physicians’ Acceptance of Computerized Physician Order Entry
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Technology Acceptance Model
      4. Methods
      5. Results
        1. Evaluating Measurements
        2. Testing Hypotheses
        3. Supplementary Analyses
      6. Discussion
      7. Conclusion
      8. References
      9. Appendix 1. Measurement Instruments
    7. X. Entrepreneurial IT Governance in a Rural Family Practice Residency Program
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. IT Governance in Healthcare
      4. Methodology: An Interpretivist Case Study Design
      5. Family Medicine
      6. Discussion
      7. Impact on Clinical Functions
      8. Conclusion and Limitations
      9. References
    8. XI. Telehealth Organizational Implementation Guideline Issues: A Canadian Perspective
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Literature Review
      4. Research Methodology
        1. Literature Review
        2. Stakeholder Survey Questionnaire
        3. Key Informant Interviews
      5. Results
        1. Organizational Telehealth Readiness
          1. Planning Readiness
          2. Leadership Readiness
          3. Workplace Environment Readiness
          4. Human Resources Readiness
          5. Healthcare System Readiness
          6. Technical Readiness
        2. Quality Assurance
        3. Accountability
          1. Governance Framework
          2. Privacy, Confidentiality, Security, and Ethics
          3. Documentation and Storage of Patient/Client Telehealth Record
          4. Liability and Risk Management
          5. Licensure, Cross-Jurisdictional Services, and Other Liability Issues
          6. Remuneration/Reimbursement
        4. Continuity
          1. Integrated Telehealth Delivery Model
          2. Administrative Interoperability
          3. Coordination of Multiple Telehealth Services
          4. Strategies and Policies to Ensure Sustainability
      6. Discussion and Conclusion
      7. Acknowledgment
      8. References
      9. Appendix A. Organizational Focus Survey Questionnaire
      10. Appendix B. Organizational Focus Key Informant Interview Questions
    9. XII. Computer Usage by U.S. Group Medical Practices 1994 vs. 2003 and Type of Usage Comparison to IT Practices in Taiwan
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Background
      4. Methodology
      5. Survey Results
        1. Characteristics of the Samples
        2. Current Computer Systems
        3. Types of Business Applications Used
      6. Importance of Different Types of Savings with Respect to Business Aspects of the Medical Practice
        1. Time Spent on Business Aspects of Practice
        2. Sources of Information on Running Business Aspects of Their Practice
      7. Discussion
        1. A Brief Comparison to Taiwan
      8. Conclusion
      9. References
  5. III. HISI Implementation, Evaluation, and Practices
    1. XIII. Decentralization of the Greek National Telemedicine System
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Telemedicine: Models and Practices
        1. Telemedicine Models
        2. Telemedicine Applications for Regional Medical Care
        3. International Telemedicine Efforts
          1. Telemedicine Projects in Greece
        4. Current State of Telemedicine in Greece
      4. Technical, Organizational, and Functional Features of the Decentralized Model
        1. The Suggested Model
        2. Technical Characteristics
        3. Organizational Characteristics
        4. Operational Features: Telemedicine and Tele-Health Services
        5. Use Cases
      5. Feasibility Study
      6. Action Plan
      7. Conclusion
      8. References
    2. XIV. Perceived Level of Benefits and Risk Core Functionalities of an EHR System
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Purpose and Goal of the Study
      4. Related Work
      5. Methodology
      6. Findings
        1. Demographics of Respondents and Hospitals Surveyed
        2. Research Question #1
        3. Research Question #2
        4. General Benefits and Risks
        5. Research Question #3
      7. Discussion
      8. Limitations
      9. Conclusion and Future Work
      10. References
      11. Appendix A
    3. XV. Using Pocket PCs for Nurses' Shift Reports and Patient Care
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Method
        1. Design and Security Considerations
          1. iCare SMS Interface
          2. iCare Worksheet for Pocket PCs
          3. iCare Sync for Pocket PCs and iCare Sync Server
        2. Study Setting and Participants
        3. Procedure
        4. Questionnaires
      4. Results
        1. Baseline Information
        2. Efficiency
        3. Perceived Benefits
        4. Key Findings from Anecdotal Notes
        5. Areas for Improvement and Suggestions
      5. Discussion
      6. Conclusion
      7. References
    4. XVI. Evaluation of a Tool to Enhance Searching for Useful Medical Information on the Internet
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
        1. Diversity
      3. Methods
        1. System Design
        2. Fuzzy Ontology
      4. Case Study
      5. Results
      6. Discussion
      7. References
  6. IV. HISI Policies and Knowledge Transfer Processes
    1. XVII. Applying Personal Health Informatics to Create Effective Patient-Centered E-Health
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Paradigms of E-Health
        1. E-Commerce Paradigm
        2. Personal Health Record Paradigm
        3. Consumer Health Informatics Paradigm
      4. Personal Health Informatics
        1. Web E-Service Infrastructure
        2. User-Centered Development
        3. Personal Health Management
        4. Health Informatics Domain
        5. Suggested Modes of Training Organization
      5. The Need for Patient-Centered E-Health
        1. Guiding Principles for Creating Patient-Centered E-Health
        2. Personal Health Informatics and Patient-Centered E-Health
      6. Conclusion
      7. References
    2. XVIII. The Impact of Certification on Healthcare Information Technology Use
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Research Hypotheses
      4. Research Methodology
        1. Survey Approach
        2. Variable Operationalization
      5. Data Analysis and Findings
        1. Sample Characteristics
        2. Hypotheses Testing
      6. Discussion and Conclusion
        1. Implications for Practice
        2. Implications for Research
        3. Limitations of the Study
        4. Future Research Directions
      7. References
    3. XIX. The Competitive Forces Facing E-Health
      1. Abstract
      2. Introduction
      3. Traditional Competitive Forces
        1. Role of the Internet of the Competitive Forces
        2. E-Opportunities in Healthcare
      4. Web of Players in Healthcare
      5. Modeling the Competitive Forces in E-Health
        1. Case Study
        2. Introduction of the Public LAN
        3. The Growth of the Public LAN
        4. The Public LAN Today
        5. The Lessons Learned
        6. The Future of the Public LAN
        7. Mapping the Case to the Model
      6. Discussion
      7. Conclusion
      8. References
    4. XX. From Theory to Practice: Healthcare Technology Management (HCTM) Conceptualization, Measures, and Practices
      1. Introduction
      2. Background
        1. HCTM Framework
        2. MOT, MMT and HCTM
        3. THE HCTM Construct
      3. Methods
        1. Content Analysis
        2. Instrumentation
          1. The Pilot Test
          2. The Field Test
        3. National Survey Administration
          1. Web-Survey Administration
      4. Findings
        1. Survey Responses
        2. The Hay Group Study
      5. Conclusion
        1. Future Research
      6. References
      7. Endnotes
  7. About the Contributors