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HCI Models, Theories, and Frameworks

Book Description

Finally—a thorough pedagogical survey of the multidisciplinary science of HCI.

Human-Computer Interaction spans many disciplines, from the social and behavioral sciences to information and computer technology. But of all the textbooks on HCI technology and applications, none has adequately addressed HCI's multidisciplinary foundations—until now.

HCI Models, Theories, and Frameworks fills a huge void in the education and training of advanced HCI students. Its authors comprise a veritable house of diamonds—internationally known HCI researchers, every one of whom has successfully applied a unique scientific method to solve practical problems.

Each chapter focuses on a different scientific analysis or approach, but all in an identical format, especially designed to facilitate comparison of the various models.

HCI Models, Theories, and Frameworks answers the question raised by the other HCI textbooks:
How can HCI theory can support practice in HCI?
* Traces HCI research from its origins
* Surveys 14 different successful research approaches in HCI
* Presents each approach in a common format to facilitate comparisons
* Web-enhanced with teaching tools at http://www.HCImodels.com

*Contributors are leading researchers in the field of Human-Comptuter Interaction

*Fills a major gap in current literature about the rich scientific foundations of HCI

*Provides a thorough pedogological survey of the science of HCI

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Critical Acclaim for HCI Models, Theories, and Frameworks
  5. The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Interactive Technologies
  6. Copyright
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Chapter 1: Introduction: Toward a Multidisciplinary Science of Human-Computer Interaction
    1. 1.1 THE GOLDEN AGE
    2. 1.2 LET 100 FLOWERS BLOSSOM
    3. 1.3 SCIENTIFIC FRAGMENTATION
    4. 1.4 TEACHING AND LEARNING
  9. Chapter 2: Design as Applied Perception
    1. 2.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 2.2 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION
    3. 2.3 CASE STUDY
    4. 2.4 CURRENT STATUS OF THEORETICAL APPROACH
  10. Chapter 3: Motor Behavior Models for Human-Computer Interaction
    1. 3.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 3.2 OVERVIEW: MODELS AND MODELING
    3. 3.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS AND MODEL DESCRIPTIONS
    4. 3.4 CASE STUDIES
  11. Chapter 4: Information Processing and Skilled Behavior
    1. 4.1 MOTIVATION FOR USING THE HUMAN INFORMATION PROCESSING THEORY IN HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION1
    2. 4.2 OVERVIEW OF GOMS
    3. 4.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS UNDERLYING GOMS
    4. 4.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF GOMS MODELS
    5. 4.5 CASE STUDY:PROJECT ERNESTINE
    6. 4.6 CURRENT STATUS
  12. Chapter 5: Notational Systems—The Cognitive Dimensions of Notations Framework
    1. 5.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 5.2 OVERVIEW
    3. 5.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 5.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 5.5 CASE STUDY: EVALUATING A VISUAL-PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE3
    6. 5.6 CURRENT STATUS
  13. Chapter 6: Users’ Mental Models: The Very Ideas
    1. 6.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 6.2 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    3. 6.3 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    4. 6.4 CASE STUDY
  14. Chapter 7: Exploring and Finding Information
    1. 7.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 7.2 MOTIVATION: MAN THE INFORMAVORE
    3. 7.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 7.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION: SCATTER/GATHER
    5. 7.5 CASE STUDY: THE WORLD WIDE WEB
    6. 7.6 CURRENT STATUS
    7. AUTHOR NOTES
  15. Chapter 8: Distributed Cognition
    1. 8.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 8.2 OVERVIEW
    3. 8.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 8.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 8.5 CASE STUDY: ENGINEERING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
    6. 8.6 CURRENT STATUS
    7. AUTHOR NOTES
  16. Chapter 9: Cognitive Work Analysis
    1. 9.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 9.2 OVERVIEW OF CWA
    3. 9.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 9.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 9.5 CASE STUDIES
    6. 9.6 CURRENT STATUS
  17. Chapter 10: Common Ground in Electronically Mediated Communication: Clark’s Theory of Language Use
    1. 10.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 10.2 OVERVIEW
    3. 10.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 10.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 10.5 CASE STUDIES—APPLYING THE THEORY TO THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGY FOR COMMUNICATION
    6. 10.6 CURRENT STATUS
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  18. Chapter 11: Activity Theory
    1. 11.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 11.2 OVERVIEW
    3. 11.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 11.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 11.5 CASE STUDY
    6. 11.6 CURRENT STATUS
  19. Chapter 12: Applying Social Psychological Theory to the Problems of Group Work
    1. 12.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 12.2 AN OVERVIEW OF CSCW RESEARCH
    3. 12.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 12.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION: EXPLAINING PRODUCTIVITY LOSS IN BRAINSTORMING TEAMS
    5. 12.5 CASE STUDY: APPLYING SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY THEORY TO THE PROBLEM OF UNDERCONTRIBUTION TO ONLINE GROUPS
    6. 12.6 CURRENT STATUS
  20. Chapter 13: Studies of Work in Human-Computer Interaction
    1. 13.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 13.2 OVERVIEW: A PARADIGMATIC CASE
    3. 13.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 13.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 13.5 CASE STUDY
    6. 13.6 CURRENT STATUS
  21. Chapter 14: Upside-Down ∀s and Algorithms—Computational Formalisms and Theory
    1. 14.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 14.2 OVERVIEW OF ISSUES AND FIRST STEPS IN FORMALISM
    3. 14.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 14.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 14.5 CASE STUDY—DIALOGUE SPECIFICATION FOR TRANSACTION PROCESSING
    6. 14.6 CURRENT STATUS
  22. Chapter 15: Design Rationale as Theory
    1. 15.1 MOTIVATION
    2. 15.2 OVERVIEW
    3. 15.3 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
    4. 15.4 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
    5. 15.5 CASE STUDY
    6. 15.6 CURRENT STATUS AND FURTHER READING
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  23. Glossary
  24. References
  25. Index
  26. About the Authors