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Handbook of Research on Social Software and Developing Community Ontologies

Book Description

The Handbook of Research on Social Software and Developing Community Ontologies examines the impact of new technologies and explores how social software and developing community ontologies are challenging the way we operate in a connected, distributed, and increasingly performative space.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Editorial Advisory Board
  3. List of Reviewers
  4. List of Contributors
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. THE ‘SOCIAL’ IN SOCIAL SOFTWARE: COMMUNITIES AND IDENTITY
    3. SOCIAL SOFTWARE AND LEARNING
    4. CHARTING THE SOCIAL SOFTWARE TERRITORY
    5. OVERALL OBJECTIVES AND MISSION
    6. REFERENCES
    7. ENDNOTES
  7. Acknowledgment
  8. About the Editors
  9. I. How the Crowd Can Teach
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. DEFINING THE GROUP
    4. DEFINING THE NETWORK
    5. DEFINING THE COLLECTIVE
    6. APPLYING THE MODEL
    7. TEACHING AND LEARNING IMPLICATIONS
      1. Group Strategies
      2. Network Strategies
      3. Collective Strategies
      4. Combinatorial Strategies
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  10. II. Social Networking and Schools: Early Responses and Implicationsfor Practice
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SOCIAL NETWORKING AND YOUNG PEOPLE
    4. THE RESPONSE OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM
    5. CONCLUSION
    6. REFERENCES
  11. III. Cyber-Identities and Social Life in Cyberspace
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CONCEPTUALIZING VIRTUALITY AND COMMUNITY
    4. TRANSFORMING IDENTITY TO CYBER-IDENTITY
      1. Eponymity
      2. Nonymity
      3. Anonymity
      4. pseudonymity
      5. polynymity
    5. THE EMPHASIS FROM CYBERSPACE TO CYBERPLACE
    6. SUMMARY AND FUTURE RESEARCH
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS
  12. IV. Weblogs in Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SOCIAL SOFTWARE, WEB 2.0, AND WEBLOGS
    4. SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING
      1. New Qualities of Social Software
      2. Integrating Weblogs in the Classroom: An Exploratory Case Study
      3. Analysis and Discussion of Findings
      4. Fields of Tension for Social Software in Education
    5. CONCLUSION AND RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES
    6. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS
  13. V. Social Navigation and Local Folksonomies: Technical and Design Considerations for a Mobile Information System
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SOCIAL NAVIGATION
      1. Mediated and Unmediated Social Navigation
      2. The Evolution of Social Navigation on the World Wide Web
    4. WEB 2.0
      1. User participation: Let the Users Generate Content
      2. Folksonomy: Let the Users Organise Content
      3. Geo-Tagging: Spatially Contextualised Content
    5. MOBILE SPATIAL INTERACTION
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS
  14. VI. Social Cognitive Ontology and User Driven Healthcare
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE DIFFERENT 'NATURES' OF HEALTHCARE
      1. The Spectrum of Ontology
      2. Social Cognitive Ontological Constructs and Generation of Emotion
      3. The Emotional Need to Know
      4. Uncertainty in Clinical Practice
    4. THE CLINICAL ENCOUNTER AS A SHARED LEARNING EXPERIENCE
      1. The Traditional Approach to the Growth of Health Information
      2. The Cycle of Habitualization and Institutionalization of Learning and Its Subsequent Disruption
      3. De-Specialization as a Disruptive Innovation: Preparing Physicians for People-Centered Healthcare
      4. Collaborative Learning
    5. IMPLEMENTING USER DRIVEN HEALTHCARE
      1. The Technology
      2. Introducing and Sustaining an Experiential Network in Routine Clinical Practice
        1. The Shared Learning Space
      3. A Dynamic PHR (Personal Health Record) to Answer Multidimensional Information Needs in a Persistent Clinical Encounter (Biswas 2008b)
        1. Analyzing the Personal Health Record (PHR)
      4. Future Directions: Evolution of Medical Knowledge in Developing Community Ontology
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
  15. VII. Social Identities, Group Formation, and the Analysis of Online Communities
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SOCIAL IDENTITY AND THE INTERNET
      1. Social Identification
      2. Social Identity Experimentation
      3. Self-presentation
    4. GROUP FORMATION
      1. Self-Categorization
      2. Collective Identification
      3. Depersonalization
    5. ANALYSING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKS
      1. Examining Links
      2. Research on Community Growth in Online Social Networks
      3. Ethnography and Social Discourse
      4. Data Visualization
    6. STRATEGIES FOR USING SOCIAL SOFTWARE IN EDUCATION
      1. preserve Relative Anonymity
      2. Enable Identity Experimentation
      3. Manipulate Self-Categorization
      4. Measuring Social Network Effectiveness
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  16. VIII. The Emergence of Agency in Online Social Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. AGENCY
      1. Self-Efficacy
      2. Locus of Control
      3. Volition
    4. EMERGENCE OF AGENCY
    5. EMERGENCE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS
    6. AGENCY AND SOCIAL NETWORKS AS DYNAMIC COMPLEX SYSTEMS
      1. Factor 1. The system cannot be decomposed into separate additive influences.
      2. Factor 2. The system has memory or includes feedback.
      3. Factor 3. The system can adapt itself according to its history, feedback, and environment.
      4. Factor 4. The system is self-organizing and non-linear.
    7. IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION
      1. Social Software as a Cultural Tool
      2. Mediated Agency
      3. Multiple Ways of knowing in Social Software
      4. Social Software as a Knowledge Building Environment
      5. Social Software Promotes Communities of practice
      6. Social Software Enables Self-Regulated Learning
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS
  17. IX. Exploiting Collaborative Tagging Systems to Unveil the User-Experience of Web Contents: An Operative Proposal
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. DETECTING SEMANTICS FROM TAGGING SYSTEMS
    5. PMI-IR
      1. Collaborative Tag Suggestion
      2. The Semantic Halo Algorithm
      3. Summary
    6. SEMANTIC DIFFERENTIAL IN COLLABORATIVE TAGGING SYSTEMS
      1. Evaluation
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ENDNOTE
    10. KEY TERMS
  18. X. The Roles of Social Networks and Communities in Open Education Programs
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. THE ROLES OF SOCIAL NETWORKS AND COMMUNITIES IN OPEN EDUCATION PROGRAMS
    3. AN OVERVIEW OF OPEN EDUCATION PROGRAMS
    4. COLLABORATION, NETWORKING AND SOCIAL VALUE IN OEPS
    5. PROGRESSION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN OEPS
    6. THE ROLE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS AND COMMUNITIES IN THE SUSTAINABILITY OF OEPS
    7. SOCIAL NETWORK ENHANCING TOOLS IN OEP SITES
    8. A VIEW TO THE FUTURE
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS
  19. XI. Distributed Learning Environments and Social Software: In Search for a Framework of Design
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. SOCIO-POLITICAL AND SOCIO-TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE
    4. BUILDING A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE DESIGN OF DISTRIBUTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS WITH SOCIAL MEDIA AND SOCIAL SOFTWARE
    5. REMAINING TECHNICAL AND CONCEPTUAL CHALLENGES
    6. CONCLUDING REMARKS AND OUTLOOK
    7. REFERENCES
  20. XII. Exploring the Role of Social Software in Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. MAIN FOCUS
      1. Social Software Survey
      2. Pilot Projects
    5. EMERGING ISSUES AND FUTURE TRENDS
      1. No One-Size-Fits-All
      2. Institutional ICT Services are not Partners in Innovation
      3. Open Source Software and 'Free' Web Services are Vital
      4. Cross-Institutional Innovation is Problematic
      5. Decentralised and Centralised
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS
  21. XIII. Identifying New Virtual Competencies for the Digital Age: Essential Tools for Entry Level Workers
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. OVERVIEW
    3. BACKGROUND
      1. Competencies Research
    4. VIRTUAL AND ENTREpRENEURIAL ATTRIBUTES FOR THE FUTURE WORKpLACE
      1. Global Competencies
    5. BASIC CULTURAL AWARENESS EXPERTISE
    6. TAPPING THE FULL POTENTIAL OF STUDENTS
      1. Engendering Transferable Skills in a Digital Era
    7. DIGITAL COMPETENCIES IN THE VIRTUAL ERA
      1. Training for the Workforce
      2. Initiatives in Education and Training Involving Digital Literacy
      3. What of the Disenfranchised?
    8. CONCLUSION
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  22. A. SOURCE OF VIRTUAL COMPETENCIES USED IN THE FUTURE WORKER COMPETENCIES QUESTIONNAIRE
  23. XIV. Social Structures of Online Religious Communities
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION: RELIGION IN CYBERSPACE
    3. SOCIAL STRUCTURES OF RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES
    4. SOCIAL STRUCTURES OF VIRTUAL RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES
    5. ANALYSIS
      1. Identity
      2. Authenticity
      3. Authority
    6. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE IMPLICATIONS
      1. New Possibilities
    7. REFERENCES
    8. ENDNOTES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  24. XV. Living, Working, Teaching and Learning by Social Software
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
      1. Information Overload: Myth or Reality?
    4. MAIN THEMES
      1. Considering Information Overload in the Context of HE
      2. Tutor as Educational Broker and 'Bridge': Searching for a New Identity within Dynamic Multiple Systems
    5. CONCLUSION: FUTURE TRENDS AND CHALLENGES
    6. REFERENCES
    7. ENDNOTES
    8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  25. XVI. Supporting Student Blogging in Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
      1. The Challenges of Student Blogging in Higher Education
      2. Our Research Context
    4. COURSE-DIRECTED BLOGGING ACTIVITIES IN PHASES 1 AND 2
      1. Reflective Writing
      2. Summaries of Case Studies
    5. ADDITIONAL BLOGGING ACTIVITIES BY STUDENTS IN pHASES 1 AND 2
      1. Resource-Network Building
      2. Social-Network Building
      3. Blogging to Fulfil Course Requirements
      4. Self-Sufficient Blogging
    6. BLOGGING ACTIVITIES BY AUTONOMOUS BLOGGERS (PHASES 4 AND 5)
      1. Explaining or Describing to an Audience
      2. Sharing with an Audience
      3. Asking for Feedback or Help
      4. Being Motivated by Committing to an Audience
      5. Becoming part of a Community
      6. Working on a Shared Project
      7. Utilising Blog Content Once It Has Been posted
    7. TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE OF BLOGGING
    8. FUTURE TRENDS
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. REFERENCES
    11. KEY TERMS
  26. XVII. Blogs as a Social Networking Tool to Build Community
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. TEACHER AS REFLECTIVE PRACTITIONER
    4. TEACHER PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY
    5. THE NEED FOR SOCIAL SUPPORT
    6. SOCIAL NETWORKING TO 'UNLEASH' PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY THROUGH REFLECTION
    7. AUTHENTIC LEARNING AS A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
      1. Description of the BEST Website
    8. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
    9. RESEARCH FINDINGS FROM ANALYSIS OF BLOGS
      1. Exploring the Genre of a Blog
      2. Student Interactions with Blogs and Environment
      3. Examining the Affordances of Blogs
    10. CONCLUDING COMMENTS
    11. REFERENCES
    12. KEY TERMS
  27. XVIII. A Model for Knowledge and Innovation in Online Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. DEFINITION AND HISTORY OF KEY TERMS
      1. Knowledge Management
      2. Online Education
      3. Social Software
    4. EXISTING LITERATURE
      1. Gaps in the Literature
    5. DESCRIPTION OF MODEL
      1. Instructional Design
      2. Content
      3. Technology and Tools
      4. Individualization
      5. Interaction
      6. Critical Reflection
      7. Strategic Alignment
      8. Leadership
      9. Community Development
      10. Innovation
      11. Sustainability
    6. FUTURE TRENDS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. REFERENCES
    10. KEY TERMS
  28. XIX. Using Social Software for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RETHINKING PEDAGOGY FROM A SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVIST PERSPECTIVE
      1. Collaborative Learning as a Process of Interaction
      2. Communities of Practice
    4. USING SOCIAL SOFTWARE TOOLS FROM A SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVIST PERSPECTIVE
      1. Using Social Software for Engaging in Collaborative Learning Processes
      2. Creating Communities of Practice With the Use of Social Software
    5. IMPLICATIONS FOR USING SOCIAL SOFTWARE FOR TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
  29. XX. The Potential of Enterprise Social Software in Integrating Exploitative and Explorative Knowledge Strategies
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. RESEARCH APPROACH
    4. EXPLOITATION AND EXPLORATION PERSPECTIVES OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
      1. Knowledge Exploitation and Exploration as Organisational Learning Strategies
      2. The Potential of Enterprise Social Software in Knowledge Exploration
        1. Knowledge Creation Process
        2. Knowledge Validation Process
        3. Knowledge Presentation Process
    5. INTERNATIONAL BANK CASE
    6. INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY CASE
    7. DISCUSSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS
  30. XXI. Personal Knowledge Management Skills for Lifelong-Learners 2.0
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. PART 1: BACKGROUND
      1. Literacy and Skills for Knowledge Society Learners
      2. Knowledge Society Lifelong-Learners
      3. Basic and Higher-Order PKM-Skills
    4. PART 2: THE SURVEY
      1. Aim
      2. Our Sample: Who are the Lifelong-Learner 2.0 Experts?
      3. The Survey: Characteristics and Network Practices of the Lifelong-Learner 2.0
    5. PART 3: SURVEY RESULTS
      1. Lifelong-Learner 2.0 Natural Pre-Disposition
      2. Competences and Skills for the Lifelong-Learner 2.0
      3. Higher-Order Skills and Competencies
        1. The Lifelong-Learner 2.0 is Connected (Connectedness)
        2. The Lifelong-Learner 2.0 has the Ability to Balance Formal and Informal Learning Contexts
        3. The Lifelong-Learner 2.0 has Critical Ability
        4. The Lifelong-Learner 2.0 is Led by Creativity
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ENDNOTES
    10. KEY TERMS
  31. XXII. Reconceptualising Information Literacy for the Web 2.0 Environment?
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. THE RISE OF INFORMATION SKILLS
    3. MODELS OF INFORMATION SKILLS
    4. THE BIG SIX SKILLSTM APPROACH
    5. THE SHIFT TO INFORMATION LITERACY: A BROADER VIEW?
    6. INFORMATION SKILLS AND THE INTERNET
    7. EXAMINING THE PROCESS MODELS
    8. INFORMATION LITERACY AND WEB 2.0: CHANGING THE CONTEXT, CHANGING THE LEARNING?
    9. WEB 2.0, INFORMATION LITERACY AND FORMAL LEARNING
    10. THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXT
    11. STUDENT REFLECTION
    12. COLLABORATIVE LEARNING
    13. LEARNERS' EXPECTATIONS OF INFORMATION
    14. DOES FINDING INFORMATION REALLY MATTER ANY MORE?
    15. IS A NEW MODEL OF INFORMATION LITERACY NEEDED TO MEET THE CHALLENGE OF WEB 2.0?
    16. CONCLUSION
    17. REFERENCES
    18. ENDNOTES
    19. KEY TERMS
  32. XXIII. Pedagogical Responses to Social Software in Universities
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. HOW SOCIAL SOFTWARE TOOLS IMPACT ON LEARNING AND WAYS OF KNOWING
      1. Implications for the Design of Learning Environments
    4. RETHINKING PARADIGMS: LEARNING AS KNOWLEDGE CREATION
      1. Applying the Metaphor: Students as Knowledge Producers
    5. LEARNING THROUGH AND WITHIN COMMUNITIES AND NETWORKS
    6. NEW CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF PEDAGOGY THAT RESONATE WITH WEB 2.0
    7. PEDAGOGY 2.0: A FRAMEWORK FOR INNOVATION
      1. Participation as an Element of Pedagogy 2.0
      2. Personalization as an Element of Pedagogy 2.0
      3. Productivity as an Element of Pedagogy 2.0
    8. CURRENT EXAMPLES OF PEDAGOGY 2.0
    9. POTENTIAL PROBLEMS AND PITFALLS IN IMPLEMENTING PEDAGOGY 2.0
    10. CONCLUSION: FUTURE LEARNING LANDSCAPES INFORMED BY PEDAGOGY 2.0 PRINCIPLES
    11. REFERENCES
    12. KEY TERMS
  33. XXIV. Knowledge Media Tools to Foster Social Learning
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. CASE STUDY
    5. MAPPING KNOWLEDGE WITH COMPENDIUM
      1. Knowledge Maps as a Strategy for Studying an OER Together
      2. Knowledge Maps as a Strategy for Sharing New References
      3. Knowledge Maps as a Strategy for Describing the Meaning of Concepts
    6. MSG: AN INSTANT MESSAGING APPLICATION WITH GEOLOCATION
      1. MSG, as Strategy for Finding Peers to Learn Together
      2. MSG, as Strategy for Mapping Social Presence
    7. FM: A WEB-BASED VIDEOCONFERENCING PPLICATION
      1. FM as Strategy for Social Learning through Group Discussion
      2. FM as Strategy for Individual Learning by Replaying the Discussion
      3. FM and Compendium as Strategy for Constructing Collective Knowledge
    8. DISCUSSION
    9. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH
    10. REFERENCES
    11. KEY TERMS
  34. XXV. A Critical Cultural Reading of "YouTube"
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. QUESTIONING DOMINANT DISCOURSES ON WEB 2.0, SNS AND YOUTUBE
    3. THEORETICAL GROUNDING, RESEARCH FOCUS AND METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK
      1. Theoretical Grounding
      2. Research Focus
      3. Methodological Framework
    4. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF YOUTUBE
      1. Intertextuality and Intermedia Context
      2. The Look of Things: Design, Identity and Metaphor
      3. Content Categorizing: Establishing and Resisting Cultural Preconceptions
      4. Staying Tuned to YouTube: Linking Strategies and Tactics
      5. Whose Tube? Alleged Purposes, Preferred Audiences and Embedded Points of View
    5. Navigational Options and Strategies in the Construction of Popularity and News Worthiness
      1. User-Generated Content: Research Opportunities into Video Form and Content
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
    8. ENDNOTES
    9. KEY TERMS
  35. XXVI. The Personal Research Portal
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
      1. A Background Note on the Open Access Paradigm and Open Access for Development
    3. THE PERSONAL RESEARCH PORTAL
      1. A Background Note on Social Software, the Web 2.0 and DIY Web Technologies
    4. A PERSONAL RESEARCH PORTAL PROTOTYPE
    5. DIGITAL IDENTITY
      1. Reading, Live Storing and the Public Notebook: Reinforcing Digital Identity
    6. WRITING AND TAKING PART IN THE CONVERSATION: NETWORK BUILDING
    7. SELF-ARCHIVING, SELF-PUBLISHING
    8. STATE OF THE SITUATION AND FUTURE TRENDS
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. REFERENCES
    11. ENDNOTES
      1. KEY TERMS
  36. XXVII. Ambient Pedagogies, Meaningful Learning and Social Software
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
      1. Dialectic and Learning
      2. Dialogic and Learning
      3. Dialectic or Dialogic? Relative Dimensions for Learning Dialogue and Meaning Making
      4. Contemporary Contexts for Learning
    4. DESIGN-BASED RESEARCH FOR CONTEMPORARY LEARNING INTERACTION AND PRACTICE
      1. Ambient Pedagogy and Experience Design
    5. DIGITAL DIALOGUE GAMES: A DESIGN-BASED APPROACH TO DIGITAL LEARNING DIALOGUE
      1. InterLoc3: Attractive, Inclusive and Reusable Learning Dialogues
      2. Technical Model and Realisation
      3. InterLoc3: Interface Design for Organising and Playing the Dialogue Games
      4. Roles and Setting the Learning Context
      5. Playing the Dialogue Game
      6. Turn-Taking and 'Listening'
      7. Saving, Replaying and Reusing the Dialogues
      8. Amending the Pre-Defined Dialogue Games
      9. Ongoing Evaluation of InterLoc3 and Preliminary Findings
    6. FUTURE TRENDS
      1. Hyper-Interactions for Learning
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. REFERENCES
    10. ENDNOTES
    11. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  37. XXVIII. Interactivity Redefined for the Social Web
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
      1. Social Computing
      2. Current Trends
      3. Contributions of this Research
    3. BACKGROUND
      1. Perspectives on Interactivity
      2. Interactivity as a perception
      3. Interactivity as properties of the Medium or Technology
      4. Interactivity as Process of Message Exchange or Interaction with Message/Medium
    4. SOCIAL COMPUTING INTERACTIVITY
      1. Control
      2. Responsiveness
      3. Reciprocal Communication
      4. Social Presence
      5. Self-presentation
      6. Deep Profiling
    5. FUTURE RESEARCH
    6. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
    8. KEY TERMS
  38. XXIX. Transliteracy as a Unifying Perspective
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. PREFACE
    3. WHAT IS TRANSLITERACY?
    4. TRACING TRANSLITERACY
    5. REALLY NEW MEDIA
    6. WRITING AND READING ARE NOT ENOUGH
    7. GOING ACROSS AND BEYOND
    8. NETWORKING THE BOOK
    9. TRANSLITERATE READING
    10. EVERYDAY LIFE IN A TRANSLITERATE WORLD
    11. CHALLENGES TO EDUCATION
    12. CHALLENGES To THE WORKPLACE
    13. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    14. REFERENCES
    15. ENDNOTES
  39. XXX. Bridging the Gap Between Web 2.0 and Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. DIFFERENT CULTURES
    4. WEB 2.0 CRITICS
    5. THE GRANULARITY OF EDUCATION
    6. THE TOPOGRAPHY OF FORMALITY
    7. THE THREAT TO HIGHER EDUCATIoN
    8. BRIDGING THE GAP
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. REFERENCES
  40. XXXI. Destructive Creativity on the Social Web: Learning through Wikis in Higher Education
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. THE EMERGENCE OF THE SOCIAL WEB
    3. IMPACT ON PEDAGOGY
    4. VLE VS. PLE
    5. PERSONALISED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
    6. WIKI: THE ARCHITECTURE OF COLLABORATION
    7. THE WIKI AS A COGNITIVE TOOL
    8. THE NEED FOR SOCIAL PRESENCE
    9. OWNERSHIP AND CONFLICT
    10. THE CREATIVE/DESTRUCTIVE PROCESS
    11. TUTOR INTERVENTION
    12. EVOLVING WIKI CULTURE
    13. CREATIVE WRITING IN WIKIS
    14. CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND WIKIS
    15. A WIKI ACTIVITY FRAMEWORK
    16. THE 'HIDDEN AUDIENCE' EFFECT
    17. STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF THE WIKI
    18. CONCLUSIONS
    19. REFERENCES
    20. KEY TERMS
  41. XXXII. Presence in Social Networks
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE MEANING OF PRESENCE
      1. What is the Message?
      2. The Purpose of Presence
      3. Semantics of Presence
      4. Awareness of Presence
    4. PRODUCING AND CONSUMING PRESENCE
      1. Presentities
      2. Producing Presence
        1. Passive Cues
        2. Explicit Cues
      3. Mapping production Mechanisms To presence Semantics
      4. Consuming presence
        1. Ambient Awareness Technologies
        2. Communication Technologies
      5. Social Networks
      6. Microblogs
      7. Categorising Presence-Consuming Techniques
      8. Interactions With Nonhuman Agents
    5. TOWARDS AN ONTOLOGY OF PRESENCE
    6. FUTURE TRENDS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. ENDNOTES
    10. KEY TERMS
  42. Compilation of References
  43. About the Contributors