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Handbook of Research on Patient Safety and Quality Care through Health Informatics

Book Description

Medical and health activities can greatly benefit from the effective use of health informatics. By capturing, processing, and disseminating information to the correct systems and processes, decision-making can be more successful and quality care and patient safety would see significant improvements. The Handbook of Research on Patient Safety and Quality Care through Health Informatics highlights current research and trends from both professionals and researchers on health informatics as applied to the needs of patient safety and quality care. Bringing together theory and practical approaches for patient needs, this book is essential for educators and trainers at multiple experience levels in the fields of medicine and medical informatics.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
  5. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. List of Reviewers
  6. Foreword
    1. HEATH INFORMATICS: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH TOWARDS HEALTHCARE
    2. REFERENCES
  7. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION
    2. PATIENT SAFETY
    3. QUALITY
    4. PERVASIVENESS OF DATA, INFORMATION, KNOWLEDGE, AND QUALITY
    5. OBJECTIVE OF THE BOOK
    6. TARGET AUDIENCE
    7. BOOK STRUCTURE
    8. REFERENCES
  8. Section 1: Patient Safety: The Human Interface
    1. Chapter 1: Informational, Physical, and Psychological Privacy as Determinants of Patient Behaviour in Health Care
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION AND PROPOSED FRAMEWORK
      3. SERVICE QUALITY AND PATIENT SAFETY
      4. PRIVACY DIMENSIONS
      5. OUTCOMES OF PRIVACY PERCEPTIONS
      6. RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 2: The SHEEP Model
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE CONTEXT
      4. METHODS
      5. SYSTEMS AND HOW WE INTERACT WITH THEM
      6. HUMAN INTERACTION: HOW WE INTERACT WITH OUR PATIENTS AND EACH OTHER
      7. ENVIRONMENT AND HOW IT INFLUENCES US
      8. EQUIPMENT
      9. PERSONAL
      10. RESULTS: USING THE SHEEP SHEET (ROSENORN-LANNG, 2014)
      11. STRATEGY FOR CHANGE
      12. CONCLUSION
      13. REFERENCES
    3. Chapter 3: G-NO-TECS
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TEAM
      4. DECISION-MAKING
      5. TASK RELATED
      6. SITUATIONAL AWARENESS
      7. SELF AWARENESS
      8. INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
      9. SUMMARY
      10. REFERENCES
    4. Chapter 4: Using a Virtual Learning Environment within Simulation to Enhance Inter-Professional Team Working Skills
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. PROCESS PLANNING
      4. 3. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
      5. 4. IMPACT WITHIN PRACTICE
      6. 5. SUMMARY
      7. REFERENCES
  9. Section 2: Patient Safety: The Process Interface
    1. Chapter 5: A New Era for Safety Measurement
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. UNDERSTANDING PATIENT SAFETY
      4. SAFETY MEASUREMENT
      5. ISSUES WITH CURRENT SAFETY MEASUREMENT
      6. DYNAMIC HEALTH SERVICES
      7. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CARE ENVIRONMENTS
      8. GAPS IN THE RESEARCH
      9. BRIDGING THE GAP: CHANGING FOCUS
      10. SUMMARY
      11. REFERENCES
    2. Chapter 6: Workarounds
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. DEVIATION AND THE CONCEPT OF WORKAROUND
      4. 3. BLOCKAGES AS MOTIVATIONS FOR WORKAROUNDS
      5. 4. WORKAROUNDS AS BLOCKS AND DEVIATIONS
      6. 5. A MODEL OF WORKAROUNDS
      7. 6. CLASSIFICATION OF WORKAROUND STRUCTURES
      8. 7. WORKAROUND PROCESS STRUCTURES
      9. 8. WORKAROUND PROCESS EFFICIENCY
      10. 9. RULES NORMS AND SEMIOTICS
      11. 10. PATIENT SAFETY AND ERRORS
      12. 11. WORKAROUND PATIENT SAFETY RISK FACTOR MODEL: WPSRF
      13. 12. CHAPTER SUMMARY
      14. REFERENCES
    3. Chapter 7: Computerisation of Clinical Pathways
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. PATIENT SAFETY
      4. 3. CLINICAL PATHWAYS
      5. 4. HUMAN FACTORS
      6. 5. CURRENT LIMITATION IN IMPLEMENTATION OF CLINICAL PATHWAYS
      7. 6. THE NECESSITY OF QUALITY HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEM TO SUPPORT IMPLEMENTATION OF CPS
      8. 7. COMPUTERISATION OF CLINICAL PATHWAYS: BASED ON A SEMIOTICALLY INSPIRED METHODOLOGY
      9. 8. ORGANIZATIONAL SEMIOTICS
      10. 9. SEMANTIC ANALYSIS FOR BUSINESS DOMAIN MODELLING
      11. 10. GENERATION OF CLINICAL PATHWAYS
      12. 11. EXTENDING CLINICAL PATHWAYS BY CAPTURING BUSINESS DYNAMICS USING NORMS
      13. 12. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
      14. REFERENCES
    4. Chapter 8: Clinical Pathway Enhanced by Knowledge Management Technology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. UNLOCKING CLINICAL PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE FOR BETTER PATIENT SAFETY
      4. 3. NORMS AS THE KNOWLEDGE FOR CLINICAL PATHWAY MANAGEMENT
      5. 4. SOCIAL-TECHNICAL ISSUES OF IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGIES IN HEALTHCARE PRACTICE
      6. REFERENCES
  10. Section 3: Patient Safety: The Technology Interface
    1. Chapter 9: Using Radio Frequency Identification Technology to Store Patients' Medical Information
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. CHILDREN’S VACCINE HISTORY RFID SOLUTION
      4. 3. DATA FORMATS FOR VACCINE HISTORY STORAGE
      5. 4. USER INTERFACE
      6. 5. SECURITY AND PRIVACY CONCERNS
      7. 6. PATIENT SAFETY
      8. 7. FUTURE WORK
      9. 8. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
    2. Chapter 10: A Pharmaco-Cybernetics Approach to Patient Safety
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. MACHINE LEARNING AS A PHARMACO-CYBERNETICS TECHNIQUE IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER
      5. APPLICATION OF PHARMACO-CYBERNETICS IN THE PREDICTION OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS
      6. IMPLICATIONS TO PATIENT SAFETY
      7. FUTURE DIRECTIONS
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
      10. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    3. Chapter 11: Patient Safety in Community Care
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION: THE PROMISE AND CHALLENGE OF COMMUNITY CARE FOR THE ELDERLY
      3. 2. TELEHEALTH, TELECARE AND TELEMEDICINE
      4. 3. E-HEALTH SUPPORT FOR INTEGRATED HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE
      5. 4. MOBILE WORKING
      6. 5. THE ORGANISATIONAL CONTEXT OF INTEGRATED CARE FOR THE ELDERLY
      7. 6. THE CHALLENGE OF CO-DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING E-HEALTH SYSTEMS
      8. 7. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    4. Chapter 12: Health Information Technology
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS AND HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
      4. TECHNOLOGICAL IATROGENESIS
      5. MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
  11. Section 4: Patient Safety: The Information Interface
    1. Chapter 13: Towards Interactive Virtual Environments through Handheld Devices for the Disabled
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. MOBILE VIRTUAL REALITY IN EVERYDAY LIFE
      4. 3. STUDY BACKGROUND: IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF CARE THROUGH BETTER PAIN ASSESSMENT
      5. 4. THE MOBILE VR APPLICATION
      6. 5. STUDY METHODOLOGY
      7. 6. FINDINGS
      8. 7. CONCLUDING DISCUSSION
      9. REFERENCES
    2. Chapter 14: Applying Social Aspects in Home Telecare Design to Improve the Safety of Users and Quality of Service
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. TELECARE BACKGROUND
      4. 3. THE SOCIAL SIDE OF TELECARE QUALITY AND RELATED THEORIES
      5. 4. PATIENT SAFETY IN TELECARE
      6. 5. THE NORMATIVE HOME TELECARE FRAMEWORK
      7. 6. FRAMEWORK VALIDATION
      8. 7. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    3. Chapter 15: Customer Strategy Definition in Elderly Care
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. INTRODUCING CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT
      4. 3. STRATEGY CENTRIC CRM
      5. 4. EXISTING THEORETICAL CRM IMPLEMENTATION FRAMEWORKS
      6. 5. ADAPTING BUTTLE FOR USE IN HEALTHCARE
      7. 6. DEVELOPING A CRM STRATEGY IN HEALTHCARE
      8. 7. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    4. Chapter 16: Technology Acceptance and Care Self-Management
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE
      4. 3. THEORIES OF TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE
      5. 4. SELF-MANAGEMENT
      6. 5. RESEARCH COMBINING TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE AND SELF-MANAGEMENT
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
  12. Section 5: Architecture, Strategy, and Policy
    1. Chapter 17: Information Architecture for Pervasive Healthcare Information Provision with Technological Implementation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. PERVASIVE HEALTHCARE INFORMATION PROVISION
      4. 3. INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE TO SUPPORT PERVASIVE HEALTHCARE INFORMATION PROVISION
      5. 4. PERVASIVE HEALTHCARE INFORMATION PROVISION IMPLEMENTATION VIA WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY
      6. 5. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    2. Chapter 18: Healthcare Resource Sustainability
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. SUSTAINABILITY AND BUILDING PERFORMANCE
      4. 3. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
      5. 4. PERVASIVE INFORMATICS
      6. 5. ORGANISATIONAL SEMIOTICS
      7. 6. SEMANTIC BUILDING INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
      8. 7. OCCUPANT PERSUASION
      9. 8. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
    3. Chapter 19: Health IT Policy in the UK
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE NATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR IT IN THE UK NHS
      4. DATA AND METHODS
      5. CASE ANALYSIS
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. APPENDIX
    4. Chapter 20: The Internet of Things and Opportunities for Pervasive Safety Monitored Health Environments
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. CAPABILITIES OF IOT
      4. 3. IMPLICATIONS FOR SAFETY
      5. 4. LIMITATIONS
      6. 5. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
  13. Compilation of References
  14. About the Contributors