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Handbook of Flexible Organic Electronics

Book Description

  • Reviews the properties and production of various flexible organic materials.
  • Describes the integration technologies of flexible organic electronics and their manufacturing methods.
  • Looks at the application of flexible organic materials in smart integrated systems and circuits, chemical sensors, microfluidic devices, organic non-volatile memory devices, and printed batteries and other power storage devices.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Related titles
  5. Copyright
  6. List of contributors
  7. Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  8. Part One. Properties and materials
    1. 1. Mechanics of curvature and strain in flexible organic electronic devices
      1. 1.1. Introduction
      2. 1.2. Stress and strain analyses
      3. 1.3. Failure under tensile stress
      4. 1.4. Failure under compressive stress
      5. 1.5. Mechanical test methods
      6. 1.6. Toward compliant and stretchable electronics
      7. 1.7. Conclusions
    2. 2. Structural and electronic properties of fullerene-based organic materials: density functional theory-based calculations
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Theoretical background
      3. 2.3. Structural transformations of fullerenes based on DFT calculations
      4. 2.4. Prototype impurities in fullerene crystals and electronic effects
      5. 2.5. Summary and future trends
    3. 3. Hybrid and nanocomposite materials for flexible organic electronics applications
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. Production methods
      3. 3.3. Properties
      4. 3.4. Limitations
      5. 3.5. Electronics applications
      6. 3.6. Future trends
      7. 3.7. Sources of further information and advice
    4. 4. Organic polymeric semiconductor materials for applications in photovoltaic cells
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. Polymeric electron donors for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic solar cells
      3. 4.3. Fullerene and polymeric-based electron acceptors for bulk heterojunction photovoltaic solar cells
      4. 4.4. Hybrid structures of polymer, copolymer semiconductors with carbon nanostructures
      5. 4.5. Conclusions
  9. Part Two. Technologies
    1. 5. High-barrier films for flexible organic electronic devices
      1. 5.1. Introduction
      2. 5.2. Encapsulation of flexible OEs
      3. 5.3. Permeability mechanisms through barrier materials
      4. 5.4. Permeation measurement techniques
      5. 5.5. Advances in high-barrier materials
      6. 5.6. Conclusions
    2. 6. Advanced interconnection technologies for flexible organic electronic systems
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. Materials and processes
      3. 6.3. Reliability
      4. 6.4. Summary and future trends
    3. 7. Roll-to-roll printing and coating techniques for manufacturing large-area flexible organic electronics
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Printing techniques
      3. 7.3. Coating techniques
      4. 7.4. Specialist coating techniques
      5. 7.5. Encapsulation techniques
      6. 7.6. Applications
      7. 7.7. Future trends
    4. 8. Integrated printing for 2D/3D flexible organic electronic devices
      1. 8.1. Introduction
      2. 8.2. Fundamentals of inkjet printing
      3. 8.3. Electronic inks
      4. 8.4. Vertically integrated inkjet-printed electronic passive components
      5. 8.5. Conclusions
    5. 9. In situ characterization of organic electronic materials using X-ray techniques
      1. 9.1. Introduction
      2. 9.2. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction
      3. 9.3. Temperature-dependent studies
      4. 9.4. <span xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" class="italic">In situ</span> X-ray studies X-ray studies
      5. 9.5. Conclusions
    6. 10. In-line monitoring and quality control of flexible organic electronic materials
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Fundamentals of spectroscopic ellipsometry
      3. 10.3. Characterization of organic electronic nanomaterials
      4. 10.4. Conclusions and future trends
    7. 11. Optimization of active nanomaterials and transparent electrodes using printing and vacuum processes
      1. 11.1. Introduction
      2. 11.2. Optimization of r2r printed active nanomaterials and electrodes
      3. 11.3. Combination of wet and vacuum techniques for OEs
      4. 11.4. Future trends
    8. 12. Laser processing of flexible organic electronic materials
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. The physics of laser interaction with thin films
      3. 12.3. Laser systems and sources
      4. 12.4. Beam delivery assembly
      5. 12.5. Laser modification of materials and C surfaces
      6. 12.6. Laser ablation processes
      7. 12.7. Laser printing
      8. 12.8. Conclusions and future trends
    9. 13. Flexible organic electronic devices on metal foil substrates for lighting, photovoltaic, and other applications
      1. 13.1. Introduction
      2. 13.2. Substrate selection
      3. 13.3. Substrate preparation
      4. 13.4. TFTs for displays on metal foil
      5. 13.5. OLED lighting and photovoltaics on metal foil
      6. 13.6. Future trends
  10. Part Three. Applications
    1. 14. Smart integrated systems and circuits using flexible organic electronics: automotive applications
      1. 14.1. Introduction
      2. 14.2. Materials for integrated systems
      3. 14.3. Manufacturing processes
      4. 14.4. Automotive applications
      5. 14.5. Conclusions
    2. 15. Chemical sensors using organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs)
      1. 15.1. Introduction
      2. 15.2. Gas and vapour sensors
      3. 15.3. Humidity sensors
      4. 15.4. pH detection
      5. 15.5. Glucose detection
      6. 15.6. Deoxyribonucleic acid detection
      7. 15.7. Conclusions
    3. 16. Microfluidic devices using flexible organic electronic materials
      1. 16.1. Introduction
      2. 16.2. Microfluidics and electronics
      3. 16.3. Materials and fabrication techniques
      4. 16.4. Device examples
      5. 16.5. Summary
      6. 16.6. Future trends
    4. 17. Two-terminal organic nonvolatile memory (ONVM) devices
      1. 17.1. Introduction
      2. 17.2. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based 2T-ONVM structures
      3. 17.3. Conclusion
    5. 18. Printed, flexible thin-film-batteries and other power storage devices
      1. 18.1. Introduction
      2. 18.2. The development of printed batteries
      3. 18.3. Basic design of printed batteries
      4. 18.4. Printing technologies and challenges
      5. 18.5. Properties of printed batteries
      6. 18.6. Conclusions and future trends
      7. Appendix: Patent applications on printed batteries
  11. Index
  12. Colour section plate captions