O'Reilly logo

Handbook of Compressible Aerodynamics by Jean Délery

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 10

Application of the One-Dimensional Theoryto the Calculation of Supersonic Nozzles

10.1. General definition of a supersonic nozzle

A supersonic propulsion nozzle with a convergent–divergent shape ensures the expansion of propellants from a subsonic state, in the combustion chamber, turbine outlet, or even after the postcombustion chamber, to a supersonic state in the exit plane (E). In most cases, the nozzles are axisymmetric. Such a supersonic nozzle is shown in Figure 10.1. It must include a throat (C) where the Mach number is equal to 1. The nozzles of this type also equip supersonic wind tunnels.

Image

Figure 10.1. Layout of a supersonic nozzle

The nozzle is fed under the initial (stagnation) conditions:

– pressure: Pstj,

– temperature: Tstj.

In these notations, we have introduced the index j to denote a propulsion jet. We denote with the index E the conditions in the exit plane whose section has an area AE:

– pressure: pE,

– density : ρE,

– temperature: TE,

– gas velocities: VE,

– Mach number: ME.

The area of the throat is denoted by: AC.

Two quantities are of particular importance for the nozzles:

– the mass flow: qm,

– the thrust: F.

These quantities can be calculated using the theory of one-dimensional flows. The results thus obtained are approximate, the flow in a real nozzle being not strictly one-dimensional. A precise calculation of the performance of a nozzle must ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required