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Group Policy by Jeremy Moskowitz

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Appendix B

Group Policy and VDI

Not everyone is flocking to virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI). Most still have a standard desktop and laptop running the operating system on the actual machine itself.

Your non-Microsoft tablet (dare I say it?), an iPad or Android, for instance, won’t run Windows. So if you want to give someone a remote desktop experience, you can use traditional Remote Desktop Services (RDS)/Terminal Services or create a VDI infrastructure.

A VDI infrastructure is loosely defined as a desktop PC running in a virtual machine on a server using a hypervisor (like Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenApp, or VMware vSphere). These “desktops” can be either persistent or nonpersistent. Persistent means that the user experience feels like a regular desktop. Users’ data and settings are preserved from session to session. Nonpersistent means that users’ changes are wiped out when the session is over.

Creating a VDI infrastructure is way beyond the scope of this book. You can create a VDI infrastructure from only Microsoft components or by using Microsoft and Citrix, VMware, Quest, and many others. You’re on your own for that part. If you’re interested in Microsoft-specific virtualization, check out Mastering Microsoft Virtualization by Tim Cerling and Jeffrey L. Buller (Sybex, 2009).

Also, for the record, I got a lot out of Brian Madden’s “The New VDI Reality” which you can pay for, or get for free here:

http://www.bitpipe.com/detail/RES/1368201274_443.html

However, what ...

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