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Good Works!: Marketing and Corporate Initiatives that Build a Better World...and the Bottom Line

Book Description

Businesses can do well by doing good -- Kotler, Hessekiel, and Lee show you how!

Marketing guru Philip Kotler, cause marketing authority David Hessekiel, and social marketing expert Nancy Lee have teamed up to create a guide rich with actionable advice on integrating marketing and corporate social initiatives into your broader business goals.

Business people who mix cause and commerce are often portrayed as either opportunistic corporate "causewashers" cynically exploiting nonprofits, or visionary social entrepreneurs for whom conducting trade is just a necessary evil in their quest to create a better world. Marketing and corporate social initiatives requires a delicate balancing act between generating financial and social dividends. Good Works is a book for business builders, not a Corporate Social Responsibility treatise. It is for capitalists with the hearts and smarts to generate positive social impacts and bottom-line business results.

Good Works is rich with actionable advice on integrating marketing and corporate social initiatives into your broader business goals.

  • Makes the case that purpose-driven marketing has moved from a nice-to-do to a must-do for businesses

  • Explains how to balance social and business goals

  • Author Philip Kotler is one of the world's leading authorities on marketing; David Hessekiel is founder and President of Cause Marketing Forum, the world's leading information source on how to do well by doing good; Nancy Lee is a corporate social marketing expert, and has coauthored books on social marketing with Philip Kotler

With Good Works, you'll find that you can generate significant resources for your cause while achieving financial success.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Acknowledgments
  5. Part 1: Introduction
    1. Chapter 1: Good Intentions Aren't Enough: Why Some Marketing and Corporate Social Initiatives Fail and Others Succeed
      1. What Is Good?
      2. What Are the Trends?
      3. Establishment of a Corporate Social Norm to Do Good
      4. What Are the Major Current Challenges to Doing Good?
    2. Chapter 2: Six Social Initiatives for Doing Well by Doing Good
      1. Starbucks
      2. Target Corporation
      3. Johnson & Johnson
      4. In Summary
  6. Part II: Marketing Driven Initiatives: Growing Sales and Engaging Customers
    1. Chapter 3: Cause Promotion: Persuading Consumers to Join Your Company in a Good Cause
      1. Case #1: Chipotle Mexican Grill—Strengthening Brand Positioning
      2. Case #2: PetSmart—Building Traffic and Customer Loyalty
      3. Case #3: First Response and March of Dimes—Creating Brand Preference with Target Markets
      4. Case #4 : Macy's and Reading Is Fundamental—Driving Sales
      5. Case #5: Farmers Insurance, Be a Hero for Babies Day—Strengthening Relationships
      6. Case #6: Food Network and Share Our Strength—Leveraging Media Assets
      7. Case #7: Pearson and Jumpstart— Strengthening Corporate Image
      8. Keys to Success
      9. Case #8: Marks & Spencer—Deriving Value from Nonprofit Partnerships
      10. Case #9: General Mills Yoplait Yogurt—Building Equity, Loyalty, and Passion
      11. Case #10: LensCrafters—Creating a Point of Differentiation
      12. Potential Concerns with Cause Promotion
      13. When Should Cause Promotion Be Considered?
      14. Developing a Cause Promotion Campaign Plan
      15. In Summary
    2. Chapter 4: Cause-Related Marketing: Making Contributions to Causes Based on Product Sales and Consumer Actions
      1. Typical Cause-Related Marketing Offer Formats
      2. Potential Business Benefits
      3. Case #1: TOMS—Building Positive Brand Identity
      4. Case #2: Sainsbury's and Comic Relief—Attracting New Customers
      5. Case #3: The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade—Building Brand Equity While Raising Funds for a Cause
      6. Case #4: The Pedigree Adoption Drive—Reaching Niche Markets
      7. Case #5: Procter & Gamble and UNICEF “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine”—Increasing Product Sales
      8. Case #6: General Mills Box Tops for Education—Building Corporate Partnerships
      9. Keys to Success
      10. Case #7: The Subaru “Share the Love” Event—Analyzing and Improving Each Year
      11. Case #8: TELUS—Maximizing Impact by Localizing Contributions
      12. Case #9: Kraft Foods Huddle to Fight Hunger—Embracing Social Media
      13. Potential Concerns
      14. When Should Cause-Related Marketing Be Considered?
      15. In Summary
    3. Chapter 5: Corporate Social Marketing: Supporting Behavior Change Campaigns
      1. Typical Corporate Social Marketing Campaigns
      2. Potential Corporate Benefits
      3. Case #1: Subway® Restaurants and Healthy Fast Food Options—Supporting Brand Positioning
      4. Case #2: Levi's® Care Tag for the Planet—Creating Brand Preference
      5. Case #3: Best Buy and e-Cycle—Building Traffic
      6. Case #4: Energizer and Change Your Clock Change Your Battery”®—Increasing Sales
      7. Case #5: Allstate and Teen Driver Pledge—Improving Profitability
      8. Case #6: Clorox and the Centers for Disease Control Say “Boo!” to the Flu—Attracting Enthusiastic and Credible Partners
      9. Case #7: Miron Construction Company and Cool Choices—Having a Real Impact on Social Change
      10. Potential Concerns
      11. Keys to Success
      12. Case #8: V/Line Life Training in Australia
      13. Case #9: Lowe's and Water—Use It Wisely
      14. Case #10: United Kingdom—Anglian Water's Keep It Clear Campaign
      15. Developing a Corporate Social Marketing Campaign Plan
      16. In Summary
  7. Part III: Corporate-Driven Initiatives: Expressing and Advancing Your Company's Values and Objectives
    1. Chapter 6: Corporate Philanthropy: Making a Direct Contribution to a Cause
      1. Typical Programs
      2. Potential Benefits
      3. Case #1: Pepsi Refresh—Creating Community Good Will and National Attention
      4. Case #2: The Boston Beer Company's Samuel Adams Brewing the American Dream Program—Strengthening the Corporation's Industry
      5. Case #3: Western Union's Our World, Our Family Program—Having an Impact on Societal Issues in Local Communities
      6. Case #4: Pfizer Trachoma Initiative—In-Kind Contributions
      7. Potential Concerns
      8. Keys to Success
      9. Case #6: ConAgra Foods—Building a Corporate Philanthropy Logic Model
      10. When to Consider
      11. In Summary
    2. Chapter 7: Community Volunteering: Employees Donating Their Time and Talents
      1. Typical Programs
      2. Potential Benefits
      3. Case #1: Sellen Construction and Seattle Children's Hospital—Building Genuine Relationships in the Community
      4. Case #2: Pfizer's Global Health Fellows Program Contributing to Business Goals
      5. Case #3: IBM's On Demand Community—Increasing Employee Satisfaction and Motivation
      6. Case #4: FedEx and Safe Kids Walk This Way—Support for Other Social Initiatives
      7. Case #5: AT&T Wireless and the American Red Cross—Showcasing Products and Services
      8. Potential Concerns
      9. Keys to Success
      10. Case #6: Patagonia's Environmental Internships
      11. When to Consider
      12. Developing Community Volunteer Programs
      13. In Summary
    3. Chapter 8: Socially Responsible Business Practices: Changing How You Conduct Business to Achieve Social Outcomes
      1. Typical Socially Responsible Business Practices
      2. Potential Corporate Benefits
      3. Case #1: DuPont—Decreasing Operating Costs
      4. Case #2: Nike's Shoes for Native Americans—Creating Brand Preference
      5. Case #3: Coca-Cola and HIV/AIDS—Enhancing Employee Well-Being
      6. Case #4: Whole Foods Market®—Building Influential Partnerships
      7. Case #5: Microsoft Supporting Alternative Transportation and Generating Community Goodwill
      8. Potential Concerns
      9. Keys to Success
      10. Case #6: Patagonia and Fair Labor Practices29
      11. When Should a Corporation Consider a Major Socially Responsible Business Practice Initiative?
      12. Developing the Initiative
      13. In Summary
  8. Part IV: Offense and Defense
    1. Chapter 9: Offense: Choosing a Social Problem to Alleviate
      1. Best Practices for Choosing a Social Problem to Alleviate
    2. Chapter 10: Offense: Selecting a Social Initiative to Support the Cause
      1. Select Initiatives That Best Meet Business Objectives and Goals
      2. Select Initiatives That Meet Priority Needs for the Cause
      3. Select Multiple Initiatives for a Single Cause, Adding Ones Missing for Current Cause Efforts
      4. Select Initiatives Representing the Most Potential for Strong Community Partners
      5. Select Initiatives Where You Have a History of Experience
      6. Select Initiatives That Will Leverage Current Abundant Resources
    3. Chapter 11: Offense: Developing Social Initiative Programs
      1. Form Internal, Cross-Functional Teams to Develop Plans
      2. Include Community Partners in Plan Development
      3. Establish Clear Objectives and Measurable Goals (Outcomes) for the Company
      4. Establish Clear Objectives and Measurable Goals (Outcomes) for the Cause
      5. Develop a Communications Plan
      6. Identify and Plan for Additional Strategic Elements
      7. Get Senior Management Buy-In
    4. Chapter 12: Offense: Evaluating Efforts
      1. Determine Purpose of Evaluation
      2. Measure and Report Resource Outputs
      3. Measure and Report Outcomes for the Company, Based on Initiative Objectives and Goals
      4. Measure and Report Outcomes for the Cause, Based on Initiative Objectives and Goals
      5. Monitor Status of Social Issues That Initiatives Are Supporting
      6. Allocate Adequate Resources for Measurement and Reporting
    5. Chapter 13: Summary of Best Practices
      1. Summary Comments for Best Practices
    6. Chapter 14: No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Dealing with Cynics and Critics
      1. Types of Criticisms
      2. In Summary
  9. Part V: For Nonprofits and Public Sector Agencies Only
    1. Chapter 15: A Marketing Approach to Winning Corporate Funding and Support for Social Initiatives: Ten Recommendations
      1. Recommendation One
      2. Recommendation Two
      3. Recommendation Three
      4. Recommendation Four
      5. Recommendation Five
      6. Recommendation Six
      7. Recommendation Seven
      8. Recommendation Eight
      9. Recommendation Nine
      10. Recommendation Ten
      11. Summary of Recommendations for Those Seeking Corporate Support
  10. Notes
    1. Chapter 1: Good Intentions Aren't Enough: Why Some Marketing and Corporate Social Initiatives Fail and Others Succeed
    2. Chapter 2: Six Social Initiatives for Doing Well by Doing Good
    3. Chapter 3: Cause Promotion: Persuading Consumers to Join Your Company in a Good Cause
    4. Chapter 4: Cause-Related Marketing: Making Contributions to Causes Based on Product Sales and Consumer Actions
    5. Chapter 5: Corporate Social Marketing: Supporting Behavior Change Campaigns
    6. Chapter 6: Corporate Philanthropy: Making a Direct Contribution to a Cause
    7. Chapter 7: Community Volunteering: Employees Donating Their Time and Talents
    8. Chapter 8: Socially Responsible Business Practices: Changing How You Conduct Business to Achieve Social Outcomes
    9. Chapter 9: Offense: Choosing a Social Problem to Alleviate
    10. Chapter 10: Offense: Selecting a Social Initiative to Support the Cause
    11. Chapter 11: Offense: Developing Social Initiative Programs
    12. Chapter 12: Offense: Evaluating Efforts
    13. Chapter 13: Summary of Best Practices
    14. Chapter 14: No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Dealing with Cynics and Critics
    15. Chapter 15: A Marketing Approach to Winning Corporate Funding and Support for Social Initiatives: Ten Recommendations
  11. Index