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Game Development with Unity

Cover of Game Development with Unity by Michelle Menard Published by Course Technology PTR
  1. Copyright
    1. Dedication
  2. About the Author
  3. I. In the Beginning. . .
    1. 1. Preface
      1. Inboxes and Emails
    2. 2. Introduction
      1. What Will Be Covered (and What Not)
      2. Intended Audience
      3. The Book’s Structure
      4. Installation Instructions
    3. 3. An Overview of the Unity Engine
      1. Getting Acquainted with the Interface
      2. Unity’s Basic Concepts
      3. Available Unity Licenses
      4. Editor Summary
    4. 4. Your First Game: Where to Start?
      1. Basic Design Theory
      2. Finding the Core Idea
      3. Planning It All Out
      4. Getting Started
  4. II. Assembling the Game Assets
    1. 5. Setting the Stage with Terrain
      1. Unity’s Terrain Engine
      2. Customizing Terrain
      3. Lighting and Shadows
      4. Adding a Skybox and Distance Fog
      5. Adding Water to Your Terrain
    2. 6. Building Your Environment: Importing Basic Custom Assets
      1. Design First, Then Build
      2. Importing Textures
      3. Importing Basic Meshes
      4. Setting Up Simple Shaders and Materials
      5. Helpful Tips for Working with Assets
    3. 7. Creating Characters
      1. Basic PC 101
      2. Importing Characters and Other Nonstatic Meshes
  5. III. Bringing Your Props to Life with Interactivity
    1. 8. Scripting in Unity
      1. One Editor, Three Languages, a Whole Lotta Choice
      2. Picking a Script Editor, or, Do you Want Autocompletion with That?
      3. Fundamentals of Scripting in Unity
      4. Operators and Comparisons
      5. Conditionals
      6. Loops
      7. Functions
      8. Variable Scope
      9. Naming Conventions
    2. 9. Writing the Character and State Controller Scripts
      1. Setting It Up and Laying It Out
      2. A Simple Third-Person Controller
      3. Setting Up Unity’s Input Manager
      4. Hooking Up the Camera
      5. Assembling the Status Controller
      6. Completed Scripts
    3. 10. Hooking Up the Animations
      1. Animation in Unity
      2. Animation API
      3. Setting Up the PC’s Animations
      4. Creating Animations Inside Unity
      5. Setting Up a New Animation Clip
      6. Adding Animation Events
      7. Completed Scripts
    4. 11. Using Triggers and Creating Environment Interactions
      1. Triggers and Collision
      2. Setting Up a Basic Trigger Object
      3. Setting Up Other Kinds of Triggers
      4. Completed Scripts
    5. 12. Building Adversaries and AI
      1. Artificial Intelligence: Definitely Artificial, Not Much Intelligence
      2. Setting Up a Simple Enemy
      3. Hooking Up Widget’s Attacks
      4. Rewarding the Player for a Job Well Done
      5. Spawning and Optimization
      6. Completed Scripts
    6. 13. Designing the Game’s GUI (Graphical User Interface)
      1. Basic Interface Theory
      2. Unity’s GUI System
      3. A Custom Skin for Widget
      4. Setting Up the HUD
      5. A Sample Pop-up Screen
      6. Adding Full-Screen Menus
      7. Completed and Updated Scripts
  6. IV. Polish and the Finishing Touches
    1. 14. Creating Lighting and Shadows
      1. Types of Lights
      2. Lighting the World
      3. Creating Shadows
      4. Other Light Effects
    2. 15. Using Particle Systems
      1. Particles: From Smoke to Stardust
      2. Setting Up a Simple System
      3. Advanced Particle Components
      4. Particles for Widget
      5. Updated Scripts
    3. 16. Adding Audio and Music
      1. Feedback and Ambience
      2. Setting Up a Simple Audio Clip
      3. Updated Scripts
  7. V. Publishing and Distributing Builds
    1. 17. Basic Unity Debugging and Optimization
      1. Debugging in Unity
      2. Optimization
    2. 18. Creating the Final Build
      1. Prepping for the Build
      2. Other Build Features
      3. The End of the Road?

Chapter 4. Your First Game: Where to Start?

Designing and building your own game from the ground up may seem like a daunting or even impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. Much like any other large or lengthy undertaking, it can help to break your game up into manageable-sized chunks and approach the design one area at a time. A good place to start is learning the basics behind game design theory and its terminology, which can help organize your ideas first on paper before bringing them to life on the computer. Planning some of your high-level ideas first can help make the first time you sit down at the computer to build your game a little less intimidating and a little more fun.

Basic Design Theory

If this is your first foray into making a ...

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