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Functionalization of Semiconductor Surfaces

Book Description

This book presents both fundamental knowledge and latest achievements of this rapidly growing field in the last decade. It presents a complete and concise picture of the the state-of-the-art in the field, encompassing the most active international research groups in the world. Led by contributions from leading global research groups, the book discusses the functionalization of semiconductor surface. Dry organic reactions in vacuum and wet organic chemistry in solution are two major categories of strategies for functionalization that will be described. The growth of multilayer-molecular architectures on the formed organic monolayers will be documented. The immobilization of biomolecules such as DNA on organic layers chemically attached to semiconductor surfaces will be introduced. The patterning of complex structures of organic layers and metallic nanoclusters toward sensing techniques will be presented as well.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. CONTENTS
  5. PREFACE
  6. CONTRIBUTORS
  7. CHAPTER 1: Introduction
    1. 1.1 MOTIVATION FOR A BOOK ON FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    2. 1.2 SURFACE SCIENCE AS THE FOUNDATION OF THE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    3. 1.3 ORGANIZATION OF THIS BOOK
    4. REFERENCES
  8. CHAPTER 2: Surface Analytical Techniques
    1. 2.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 2.2 SURFACE STRUCTURE
    3. 2.3 SURFACE COMPOSITION, ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, AND VIBRATIONAL PROPERTIES
    4. 2.4 KINETIC AND ENERGETIC PROBES
    5. 2.5 CONCLUSIONS
    6. REFERENCES
  9. CHAPTER 3: Structures of Semiconductor Surfaces and Origins of Surface Reactivity with Organic Molecules
    1. 3.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 3.2 GEOMETRY, ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, AND REACTIVITY OF CLEAN SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    3. 3.3 GEOMETRY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF H-TERMINATED SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    4. 3.4 GEOMETRY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF HALOGEN-TERMINATED SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    5. 3.5 REACTIVITY OF HYDROGEN- OR HALOGEN-TERMINATED SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES IN SOLUTION
    6. 3.6 SUMMARY
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    8. REFERENCES
  10. CHAPTER 4: Pericyclic Reactions of Organic Molecules at Semiconductor Surfaces1
    1. 4.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 4.2 [2+2] CYCLOADDITION OF ALKENES AND ALKYNES
    3. 4.3 [4+2] CYCLOADDITION OF DIENES
    4. 4.4 CYCLOADDITION OF UNSATURATED ORGANIC MOLECULES CONTAINING ONE OR MORE HETEROATOM
    5. 4.5 SUMMARY
    6. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    7. REFERENCES
  11. CHAPTER 5: Chemical Binding of Five-Membered and Six-Membered Aromatic Molecules
    1. 5.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 5.2 FIVE-MEMBERED AROMATIC MOLECULES CONTAINING ONE HETEROATOM
    3. 5.3 FIVE-MEMBERED AROMATIC MOLECULES CONTAINING TWO DIFFERENT HETEROATOMS
    4. 5.4 BENZENE
    5. 5.5 SIX-MEMBERED HETEROATOM AROMATIC MOLECULES
    6. 5.6 SIX-MEMBERED AROMATIC MOLECULES CONTAINING TWO HETEROATOMS
    7. 5.7 ELECTRONIC AND STRUCTURAL FACTORS OF THE SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES FOR THE SELECTION OF REACTION CHANNELS OF FIVE-MEMBERED AND SIX-MEMBERED AROMATIC RINGS
    8. REFERENCES
  12. CHAPTER 6: Influence of Functional Groups in Substituted Aromatic Molecules on the Selection of Reaction Channel in Semiconductor Surface Functionalization
    1. 6.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 6.2 MULTIFUNCTIONAL AROMATIC REACTIONS ON CLEAN SILICON SURFACES
    3. 6.3 SUMMARY
    4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    5. REFERENCES
  13. CHAPTER 7: Covalent Binding of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Systems
    1. 7.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 7.2 PAHs ON Si(100)-(2x1)
    3. 7.3 PAHs on Si(111)-(7x7)
    4. 7.4 SUMMARY
    5. REFERENCES
  14. CHAPTER 8: Dative Bonding of Organic Molecules
    1. 8.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 8.2 DATIVE BONDING OF LEWIS BASES (NUCLEOPHILIC)
    3. 8.3 DATIVE BONDING OF LEWIS ACIDS (ELECTROPHILIC)
    4. 8.4 SUMMARY
    5. REFERENCES
  15. CHAPTER 9: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Studies of Conjugated Dienes on Semiconductor Surfaces
    1. 9.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 9.2 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS
    3. 9.3 REACTIONS ON THE SI(100)-(2 x 1) SURFACE
    4. 9.4 REACTIONS ON THE SIC(100)-(3x2) SURFACE
    5. 9.5 REACTIONS ON THE SIC(100)-(2x2) SURFACE
    6. 9.6 CALCULATION OF STM IMAGES: FAILURE OF PERTURBATIVE TECHNIQUES
    7. REFERENCES
  16. CHAPTER 10: Formation of Organic Nanostructures on Semiconductor Surfaces
    1. 10.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 10.2 EXPERIMENTAL
    3. 10.3 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
    4. 10.4 CONCLUSIONS
    5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    6. REFERENCES
  17. CHAPTER 11: Formation of Organic Monolayers Through Wet Chemistry
    1. 11.1 INTRODUCTION, MOTIVATION, AND SCOPE OF CHAPTER
    2. 11.2 TECHNIQUES CHARACTERIZING WET CHEMICALLY FUNCTIONALIZED SURFACES
    3. 11.3 HYDROSILYLATION OF H-TERMINATED SURFACES
    4. 11.4 ELECTROCHEMISTRY OF H-TERMINATED SURFACES
    5. 11.5 USE OF HALOGEN-TERMINATED SURFACES
    6. 11.6 ALCOHOL REACTION WITH H-TERMINATED SI SURFACES
    7. 11.7 OUTLOOK
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    9. REFERENCES
  18. CHAPTER 12: Chemical Stability of Organic Monolayers Formed in Solution
    1. 12.1 REACTIVITY OF H-TERMINATED SILICON SURFACES
    2. 12.2 REACTIVITY OF HALOGEN-TERMINATED SILICON SURFACES
    3. 12.3 CARBON-TERMINATED SILICON SURFACES
    4. 12.4 APPLICATIONS AND STRATEGIES FOR FUNCTIONALIZED SILICON SURFACES
    5. 12.5 CONCLUSIONS
    6. REFERENCES
  19. CHAPTER 13: Immobilization of Biomolecules at Semiconductor Interfaces
    1. 13.1 INTRODUCTION
    2. 13.2 MOLECULAR AND BIOMOLECULAR INTERFACES TO SEMICONDUCTORS
    3. 13.3 DNA-MODIFIED SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES
    4. 13.4 PROTEINS AT SURFACES
    5. 13.5 COVALENT BIOMOLECULAR INTERFACES FOR DIRECT ELECTRICAL BIOSENSING
    6. 13.6 NANOWIRE SENSORS
    7. 13.7 SUMMARY
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    9. REFERENCES
  20. CHAPTER 14: Perspective and Challenge
  21. INDEX