You are previewing Functional Programming in C#: Classic Programming Techniques for Modern Projects.

Functional Programming in C#: Classic Programming Techniques for Modern Projects

  1. Cover
  2. Title
  3. Copyright
  4. About the Author
  5. Credits
  6. Contents
  7. Introduction
  8. Part I : Introduction to Functional Programming
    1. Chapter 1 : A Look at Functional Programming History
      1. What Is Functional Programming?
      2. Functional Languages
      3. The Relationship to Object Oriented Programming
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 2 : Putting Functional Programming into a Modern Context
      1. Managing Side Effects
      2. Agile Programming Methodologies
      3. Declarative Programming
      4. Functional Programming Is a Mindset
      5. Is Functional Programming in C# a Good Idea?
      6. Summary
  9. Part II : C# Foundations of Functional Programming
    1. Chapter 3 : Functions, Delegates, and Lambda Expressions
      1. Functions and Methods
      2. Reusing Functions
      3. Anonymous Functions and Lambda Expressions
      4. Extension Methods
      5. Referential Transparency
      6. Summary
    2. Chapter 4 : Flexible Typing with Generics
      1. Generic Functions
      2. Generic Classes
      3. Constraining Types
      4. Other Generic Types
      5. Covariance and Contravariance
      6. Summary
    3. Chapter 5 : Lazy Listing with Iterators
      1. The Meaning of Laziness
      2. Enumerating Things with .NET
      3. Implementing Iterator Functions
      4. Chaining Iterators
      5. Summary
    4. Chapter 6 : Encapsulating Data in Closures
      1. Constructing Functions Dynamically
      2. The Problem with Scope
      3. How Closures Work
      4. Summary
    5. Chapter 7 : Code Is Data
      1. Expression Trees in .NET
      2. Analyzing Expressions
      3. Generating Expressions
      4. .NET 4.0 Specifics
      5. Summary
  10. Part III : Implementing Well-known Functional Techniques in C#
    1. Chapter 8 : Currying and Partial Application
      1. Decoupling Parameters
      2. Calling Parts of Functions
      3. Why Parameter Order Matters
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 9 : Lazy Evaluation
      1. What’s Good about Being Lazy?
      2. Passing Functions
      3. Explicit Lazy Evaluation
      4. Comparing the Lazy Evaluation Techniques
      5. How Lazy Can You Be?
      6. Summary
    3. Chapter 10 : Caching Techniques
      1. The Need to Remember
      2. Precomputation
      3. Memoization
      4. Summary
    4. Chapter 11 : Calling Yourself
      1. Recursion in C#
      2. Tail Recursion
      3. Accumulator Passing Style
      4. Continuation Passing Style
      5. Indirect Recursion
      6. Summary
    5. Chapter 12 : Standard Higher Order Functions
      1. Applying Operations: Map
      2. Map, Filter, and Fold in LINQ
      3. Standard Higher Order Functions
      4. Summary
    6. Chapter 13 : Sequences
      1. Understanding List Comprehensions
      2. A Functional Approach to Iterators
      3. Ranges
      4. Restrictions
      5. Summary
    7. Chapter 14 : Constructing Functions from Functions
      1. Composing Functions
      2. Advanced Partial Application
      3. Combining Approaches
      4. Summary
    8. Chapter 15 : Optional Values
      1. The Meaning of Nothing
      2. Implementing Option(al) Values
      3. Summary
    9. Chapter 16 : Keeping Data from Changing
      1. Change Is Good — not!
      2. False Assumptions
      3. Implementing Immutable Container Data Structures
      4. Alternatives to Persistent Data Types
      5. Summary
    10. Chapter 17 : Monads
      1. What’s in a Typeclass?
      2. What’s in a Monad?
      3. Why Do a Whole Abstraction?
      4. A Second Monad: Logging
      5. Syntactic Sugar
      6. Binding with SelectMany?
      7. Summary
  11. Part IV : Putting Functional Programming into Action
    1. Chapter 18 : Integrating Functional Programming Approaches
      1. Refactoring
      2. Writing New Code
      3. Finding Likely Candidates for Functional Programming
      4. Summary
    2. Chapter 19 : The MapReduce Pattern
      1. Implementing MapReduce
      2. Abstracting the Problem
      3. Summary
    3. Chapter 20 : Applied Functional Modularization
      1. Executing SQL Code from an Application
      2. Rewriting the Function with Partial Application and Precomputation in Mind
      3. Summary
    4. Chapter 21 : Existing Projects Using Functional Techniques
      1. The .NET Framework
      2. LINQ
      3. Google MapReduce and Its Implementations
      4. NUnit
      5. Summary
  12. Index
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COMBINING APPROACHES

In pure functional programming, the two function construction approaches — composition and partial application — are commonly used to create new functions on the basis of existing ones. This is not the only possible approach; there’s always the alternative of defining a new function that calls one or more existing functions. Look at this example:

Func<int, Func<int, int>> add = x => y => x + y;

 

var add5PA = add(5);

 

Func<int, int> add5 = x => add(5)(x);

Both the add5PA and the add5 functions make use of the existing add function, and define a new function that will add 5 to its one remaining argument. This is a choice that’s always available when it comes to functional reuse, and there’s no general guideline as to when you should go for one or the other approach.

The main difference is that when using function construction techniques, you typically create a number of intermediate functions that perform part of the task at hand. When functions are constructed for the purpose of reuse within a single function, this might be irrelevant, but when they are created as parts of a larger functional framework, the intermediate functions might be usable in their own right. That is an advantage over the complete redefinition approach because there is no redundancy in the declarations.

The following paragraphs describe a use case for function construction that has been chosen purposefully because it is rather more complex than what you’d typically want to do in C#. ...

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