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Frameworks of IT Prosumption for Business Development

Book Description

Separation distinction between the roles of the producer and consumer has become blurred with the development of new science and technologies enabling the emergence of the prosumer, or the active consumer. In the IT sector, the role of the end-user has broadened to include innovation and development practices in addition to the traditional consumer activities. As such, businesses must create opportunities for product development and innovation by the consumers. Frameworks of IT Prosumption for Business Development investigates the latest empirical research on active use of information technology resources, enabling users with new methodologies, tools, and opportunities to impact application development processes. The objective of this reference book is to mobilize end-users to take a more active role in their own IT solutions, which will in turn assist in the development of best practices in IT at all levels.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
  5. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
  6. Preface
    1. STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK
    2. POTENTIAL USES
  7. Acknowledgment
  8. Section 1: Theoretical Considerations on IT Prosumption and Prosumers
    1. Chapter 1: The Challenges of the Prosumer as Entrepreneur in IT
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE PROSUMER: A NEW CONSUMER OR A NEW STAKEHOLDER FOR ORGANISATIONS?
      4. THE DILEMMA OF AN ORGANISATION: CAN THE PROSUMER BE A STRATEGIC FACTOR?
      5. THE ELEMENTS OF STRATEGY OF THE ENTREPRENEUR PROSUMER
      6. THE IMPACT OF THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ON PROSUMER AS ENTREPRENEUR
      7. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      8. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 2: Improving IT Market Development through IT Solutions for Prosumers
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. USER CHARACTERISTICS BELONGING TO THE SERVICE CONCEPT (SC)
      4. EVALUATE NEW SERVICE DEVELOPMENT (NSD) MODELS
      5. IDENTIFYING DIFFERENT TYPES OF USER NEEDS
      6. IDENTIFY HOW HUMAN PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS MAY INFLUENCE THE PROSUMER
      7. PRODUCE PROSUMER SPECIFICATION TO IMPROVE IT MARKET DEVELOPMENT
      8. SUMMARY
      9. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    3. Chapter 3: Concept of User Experience and Issues to be Discussed
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. FROM THE USABILITY TO THE UX
      4. 3. KUROSU’S CONCEPT STRUCTURE
      5. 4. ADVENT OF CONCEPT OF UX AND SOME RELATED ISSUES
      6. 5. KEY ASPECTS OF THE UX OTHER THAN QUALITY TRAITS
      7. 6. TEMPORAL STRUCTURE OF THE UX
      8. 7. SERVICE AND THE UX
      9. 8. CONCLUSION: A PATH TO THE FUTURE
    4. Chapter 4: Evolution of End User Participation in IT Projects
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND: THE NATURE OF USER PARTICIPATION IN IT PROJECTS
      4. MAIN STAGES OF USER PARTICIPATION
      5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 5: Enabling IT Innovation through Soft Systems Engineering
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TEAMWORK
      4. SOFT SYSTEM ENGINEERING AND IT INNOVATION
      5. APPLICATION DOMAIN AND PRODUCTION DOMAIN
      6. USER-DRIVEN INNOVATION AND OPEN INNOVATION
      7. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      8. CONCLUSION
    6. Chapter 6: Prosumer’s Responsibilities?
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MODELING RESPONSIBILITY
      4. CONSTRAINT MODEL
      5. TOWARDS A GENERIC CONSTRAINTS TOPOLOGY
      6. THE USAGE OF SERVICES BY PROSUMERS
      7. USAGE SCENARIO/CASE STUDY IN LUXEMBOURG MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL
      8. CONCLUSION
  9. Section 2: Qualitative and Quantitative Research on IT Prosumption Development and Evaluation
    1. Chapter 7: Web 2.0 and its Implications on Globally Competitive Business Model
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. 1. INTRODUCTION
      3. 2. LITERATURE REVIEW
      4. 3. BUSINESS MODEL TRANSFORMATION REQUIREMENTS
      5. 4. STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT OF WEB-BASED BUSINESS MODEL AND IMPLICATIONS OF WEB 2.0
      6. 5. HIGH VELOCITY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND WEB 2.0 AS STRATEGY
      7. 6. INTEGRATING WEB 2.0 INTO THE BUSINESS MODEL
      8. 7. BLENDING BUSINESS MODEL ALONG WEB 2.0
      9. DISCUSSION
      10. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 8: Exploring the Effects of Trust, Perceived Risk, and E-Services Systems on Public Services in E-Government
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND
      4. MAIN FOCUS OF THE CHAPTER
      5. SOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 9: Information Technology Prosumption Acceptance by Business Information System Consultants
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND: PARTICIPATION VS. INVOLVEMENT
      4. THE FIRST MAIN FOCUS OF THE CHAPTER: THEORETICAL APPROACHES REVIEW
      5. THE SECOND MAIN FOCUS OF THE CHAPTER: EMPIRICAL RESEARCH ON USER INVOLVEMENT
      6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 10: Cognitive Authority Revisited in Web Social Interaction
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. COGNITIVE AUTHORITY REVISITED IN THE VALUE PIE
      5. NETWORK OF AUTHORITIES: A CASE STUDY
      6. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 11: Social Acceptability of Open Source Software by Example of the Ubuntu Operating System
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. OVERVIEW OF OTHER ACCEPTANCE MODELS
      5. INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM GOO.GL SERVICE
      6. THE SURVEY ABOUT ACCEPTANCE OF UBUNTU OPERATING SYSTEM BY USERS.
      7. RELIABILITY ANALYSIS WITH THE GNU PSPP
      8. CONCLUSION
  10. Section 3: ICT Development for Prosumers and Produsers
    1. Chapter 12: Users as Prosumers of PETs
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CONCEPTS ON PRIVACY AND USER-CENTERED DESIGN
      4. DEMOCRATIZING THE DESIGN OF PRIVACY ENHANCING TOOLS
      5. USING CO-CREATION FOR THE GENERATION OF PET IDEAS
      6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH
    2. Chapter 13: Harvesting Deep Web Data through Produser Involvement
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. DEEP WEB STRUCTURE
      4. DEEP WEB HARVESTING
      5. END USER DEVELOPMENT
      6. PRODUSERS IN THE DEEP WEB
      7. DEEP WEB HARVESTING SOLUTIONS FOR PRODUSERS
      8. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 14: User-Driven Documentation Building for the ERP System
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. MAIN FOCUS OF THE CHAPTER
      5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 15: The Prosumer Paradigm for Life Cycle Assessment Services
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. THE FRAMEWORK DESCRIPTION
      5. THE RELEVANT PROTOTYPE
      6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
  11. Section 4: ICT Prosumption Applications' Review
    1. Chapter 16: TRIZ Guidelines for Innovating E-Learning Environments with Respect to Prosuming
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. E-LEARNING PROSUMING
      4. TRIZ
      5. TRIZ 40 PRINCIPLES
      6. RESOLVING CONTRADICTIONS
      7. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 17: Evaluating E-Learning from an End User Perspective
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SUMMARY
      4. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    3. Chapter 18: Social Networks and Internet Communities in the Field of Geographic Information and Their Role in Open Data Government Initiatives
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. STRATEGIES DEALING WITH OPEN GEOSPATIAL DATA
      5. TOP-DOWN APPROACH
      6. INSPIRE
      7. TWO-WAY APPROACH
      8. BOTTOM-UP APPROACH: USER-GENERATED CONTENT
      9. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      10. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 19: Reader-Centric Writing for a Prosumer Market
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. DEFINITION OF TERMS
      4. HOW DO YOU KNOW WHETHER YOUR CONTENT IS GOOD?
      5. CAREERS
      6. A COMPLICATED INFORMATION SYSTEM
      7. PERSUASIVE AND NOT SO PERSUASIVE CONTENT
      8. A RUBRIC FOR CULLING THE CHAF
      9. USING THE PROCESS
      10. THE IDEAL WRITER
      11. WHAT DOES THIS WRITER LOOK LIKE?
      12. CONCLUSION
    5. Chapter 20: Learning Styles in E-Learning
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THE ICT-SUPPORTED PROCESS OF LEARNING IN THEORY
      4. THE ICT-SUPPORTED PROCESS OF E-LEARNING IN PRACTICE
      5. LEARNING STYLES IN E-LEARNING
      6. RESEARCH PROJECT CONCEPT AND METHODOLOGY
      7. RESEARCH RESULTS
      8. CONCLUSION
  12. Compilation of References
  13. About the Contributors