O'Reilly logo

Fonts & Encodings by Yannis Haralambous

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

7.1. Tools for Managing Fonts

7.1.1. The Extension of Font Properties

Let us begin with a tool that should ideally be part of the operating system. It is a little utility called ttfext [257] that Microsoft provides free of charge. It is launched every time we ask to see the properties of a TrueType or OpenType font. Its interface takes the form of a window with tabs. It includes the classic General tab (which is also the only way to determine the name of a given font) and adds nine others:

Figure 7-4. Two tabs of the Properties window of the font Linotype Palatino. Left: OpenType properties. Right: a general description of the font.
  • Embedding: can the font in question be embedded in a document? There are four possibilities: Installable embedding allowed (the font can be embedded in a document and can even be installed on the client's system), Editable embedding allowed (the font can be embedded in a document and can be used to edit text, but it can be only temporarily installed on the client's machine), Print & Preview embedding allowed (the font can be embedded in a document but can be used only for display and printing, and it may be only temporarily installed), and Restricted license embedding (the font may not be embedded in a document).

  • CharSet/Unicode: what is the font's default encoding? Which Unicode zones does the font cover? Which other encodings are compatible with ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required