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Fonts & Encodings by Yannis Haralambous

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6.2. The situation under Mac OS X

Several years ago, before Steve Jobs returned to Apple, no one would have believed that we could have a Unix operating system that was also a version of Mac OS. The feat was to bring users the benefits of Unix without losing the wealth of features acquired by the various releases of Mac OS since 1984. Fonts were also affected: we saw in the previous section the variety of file types in use ("font suitcases", bitmaps, TrueType, PostScript, OpenType, etc.). Obviously Mac OS X had to accept all these file formats, for reasons of compatibility. But Mac OS X also aimed to simplify the existing order.

Figure 6-2. The same file that is shown in Figure 6-1, as seen under Mac OS X.

And simplify it did! In Figure 6-2 we see the same window shown in Figure 6-1, as it appears under Mac OS X. What a surprise to see that all of the files described in the preceding section, even though they are of very different natures, are represented by the same icon (a letter 'A' on a white background)! Even the file Zapfino.dfont uses this icon, as it will henceforth be recognized by the operating system.[6-2]

[6-2] Now is the time to remove the mystery that enshrouds this "new format", which is not really a format at all, as it is merely a "font suitcase" in which all the information that had been in the resource section has been transferred unchanged to the data section. ...

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