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Fight Choreography: The Art of Non-Verbal Dialogue by John Kreng

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Justification for Actions Taken

The choreographer has to convey a lot of unspoken rules to the audience. The type of action is key to either connecting or disengaging the audience from what you are doing. The audience has a vested interest in the characters and what will happen to them, and that must be respected.

For example, suppose the hero is about to fight the main villain of the story, who raped and killed his wife, murdered his kids, and burned down his house. The audience expects retribution for the hero, so they give him a license to do what was done to him back to the villain. In this case, you are allowed to break the villain’s legs, poke out his eyes, crush his skull, and stab him repeatedly with a knife until he is dead.

Now, suppose ...

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