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Fedora Bible 2010 Edition: Featuring Fedora Linux 12

Book Description

The perfect companion for mastering the latest version of Fedora and RHEL

As a free, open source Linux operating system sponsored by Red Hat, Fedora can either be a stepping stone to Enterprise or used as a viable operating system for those looking for frequent updates. Written by veteran authors of perennial bestsellers, this book serves as an ideal companion for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) users and offers a thorough look at the basics of the new Fedora 12.

Step-by-step instructions make the Linux installation simple while clear explanations walk you through best practices for taking advantage of the desktop interface. You'll learn how to use the Linux shell, file system, and text editor. Plus, the authors describe key system administration skills, such as setting up users, automating system tasks, backing up and restoring files, and understanding the latest security issues and threats.

  • Walks you through new features of Fedora 12, the open source Linux operating system sponsored by Red Hat

  • Covers the latest networking, desktop, and server enhancements to Fedora 12

  • Shares tips for taking advantage of the desktop interface; using and customizing the desktop menus, icons, window manager, and xterm; and automating system tasks

  • Demonstrates how to backup and restore files and handle security threats

  • Shows you how to create and publish formatted documents with Linux applications

  • Accompanying DVD and CD-ROM include Fedora Linux 12 and an official Fedora 12 LiveCD

Whether a new or power user of Fedora, you'll benefit from Fedora 12 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Bible.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About the Authors
  3. Credits
  4. Acknowledgments
  5. Preface
    1. Who Are You?
    2. This Book's Learn-Through-Tasks Approach
    3. What You Need
      1. Fedora Bible 2010 Edition Improvements
    4. Conventions Used in This Book
    5. How This Book Is Organized
      1. Part I: Getting Started in Fedora
      2. Part II: Using Fedora
      3. Part III: Administering Fedora
      4. Part IV: Fedora Network and Server Setup
      5. Appendixes
    6. About the Companion Media
    7. Reach Out
  6. 1. Getting Started in Fedora
    1. 1. An Overview of Fedora
      1. 1.1. Introducing Fedora 12
      2. 1.2. What Is Linux?
      3. 1.3. Linux's Roots in UNIX
      4. 1.4. Common Linux Features
      5. 1.5. Primary Advantages of Linux
      6. 1.6. What Is Fedora?
        1. 1.6.1. Red Hat forms the Fedora Project
        2. 1.6.2. Red Hat shifts to Red Hat Enterprise Linux
        3. 1.6.3. Choosing between Fedora and Enterprise
      7. 1.7. Why Choose Fedora?
      8. 1.8. Moving Toward Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
      9. 1.9. New Features in Fedora 12
        1. 1.9.1. PackageKit Software Management improvements
        2. 1.9.2. NetworkManager improvements
        3. 1.9.3. SystemTap improvements
        4. 1.9.4. KVM virtualization improvements
        5. 1.9.5. RPMfusion.org third-party software repository
        6. 1.9.6. Getting custom Fedora spins
        7. 1.9.7. Creating your own spins
      10. 1.10. The Culture of Free Software
      11. 1.11. Summary
    2. 2. Installing Fedora
      1. 2.1. Understanding Fedora Installation Media
      2. 2.2. Using the Fedora 12 Live CD
      3. 2.3. Quick Installation
      4. 2.4. Detailed Installation Instructions
        1. 2.4.1. Installing Fedora 12
        2. 2.4.2. Choosing an installation method
          1. 2.4.2.1. Install or upgrade?
          2. 2.4.2.2. From DVD, network, or hard disk?
        3. 2.4.3. Choosing computer hardware
        4. 2.4.4. Preparing for installation using the live CD
          1. 2.4.4.1. Display hardware information
          2. 2.4.4.2. Test your hardware
        5. 2.4.5. Beginning the installation
        6. 2.4.6. Running Fedora Firstboot
        7. 2.4.7. Going forward after installation
      5. 2.5. Special Installation Procedures
        1. 2.5.1. Alternatives for starting installation
          1. 2.5.1.1. Booting installation from hard disk
          2. 2.5.1.2. Booting installation from a USB device
          3. 2.5.1.3. Booting installation using PXE
        2. 2.5.2. Installing from other media
          1. 2.5.2.1. Beginning installation
          2. 2.5.2.2. Setting up an HTTP, FTP, or NFS install server
            1. 2.5.2.2.1. Configuring an install server using files
            2. 2.5.2.2.2. Configuring an install server using disk images
            3. 2.5.2.2.3. NFS server
            4. 2.5.2.2.4. Web server
            5. 2.5.2.2.5. FTP server
            6. 2.5.2.2.6. Hard disk install
        3. 2.5.3. Starting a VNC install
        4. 2.5.4. Performing a kickstart installation
          1. 2.5.4.1. Creating the kickstart file
          2. 2.5.4.2. Installing the kickstart file
          3. 2.5.4.3. Booting a kickstart installation
      6. 2.6. Special Installation Topics
        1. 2.6.1. Setting up to dual-boot Linux and Windows
          1. 2.6.1.1. Resizing your Windows partitions
          2. 2.6.1.2. Using Windows partitions from Linux
        2. 2.6.2. Partitioning your disks
          1. 2.6.2.1. Partitioning with Disk Setup during installation
            1. 2.6.2.1.1. Reasons for partitioning
            2. 2.6.2.1.2. Deleting, adding, and editing partitions
          2. 2.6.2.2. Partitioning with fdisk
          3. 2.6.2.3. Tips for creating partitions
        3. 2.6.3. Installing Fedora on an Intel-based Mac
          1. 2.6.3.1. Before installing Fedora on your Mac
          2. 2.6.3.2. Installing Fedora
        4. 2.6.4. Using the GRUB boot loader
          1. 2.6.4.1. Temporarily changing boot options
          2. 2.6.4.2. Permanently changing boot options
          3. 2.6.4.3. Adding a new GRUB boot image
      7. 2.7. Troubleshooting Installation
      8. 2.8. Spinning Your Own Fedora Install or Live Media
      9. 2.9. Summary
    3. 3. Getting Productive with the Desktop
      1. 3.1. Logging in to Fedora
      2. 3.2. Getting Familiar with the Desktop
        1. 3.2.1. Touring your desktop
        2. 3.2.2. Getting more desktop space with virtual workspaces
      3. 3.3. Using the GNOME Desktop
        1. 3.3.1. Launching applications from the top bar
        2. 3.3.2. Switching windows from the bottom bar
        3. 3.3.3. Browsing files
          1. 3.3.3.1. Working with removable media
        4. 3.3.4. Customizing the desktop
          1. 3.3.4.1. Modifying the GNOME panels
          2. 3.3.4.2. Adding an application launcher
          3. 3.3.4.3. Adding an applet
          4. 3.3.4.4. Adding another panel
          5. 3.3.4.5. Adding a drawer
          6. 3.3.4.6. Changing panel properties
        5. 3.3.5. Using the Metacity window manager
        6. 3.3.6. Switching to another user
        7. 3.3.7. Exiting GNOME
      4. 3.4. Switching Desktop Environments
      5. 3.5. Using the KDE Desktop
        1. 3.5.1. Launching applications
        2. 3.5.2. Switching windows from the bottom bar
          1. 3.5.2.1. Pinning windows on top or bottom
          2. 3.5.2.2. Getting around the desktop
            1. 3.5.2.2.1. Using the mouse
            2. 3.5.2.2.2. Using keystrokes
          3. 3.5.2.3. Using virtual desktops
        3. 3.5.3. Managing files with Dolphin and Konqueror file managers
          1. 3.5.3.1. Working with files
          2. 3.5.3.2. Searching for files with Dolphin and kfind
          3. 3.5.3.3. Using Konqueror
        4. 3.5.4. Customizing the KDE desktop
        5. 3.5.5. Adding widgets
          1. 3.5.5.1. Adding widgets to the panel
          2. 3.5.5.2. Adding widgets to the desktop
      6. 3.6. Using the Xfce Desktop Environment
      7. 3.7. Using the Moblin Desktop
      8. 3.8. Running 3D Accelerated Desktop Effects
      9. 3.9. Troubleshooting Your Desktop
        1. 3.9.1. GUI doesn't work at startup
        2. 3.9.2. Tuning your video card and monitor
          1. 3.9.2.1. Running the Display Settings window
          2. 3.9.2.2. Understanding the xorg.conf file
        3. 3.9.3. Getting more information
      10. 3.10. Summary
    4. 4. Using Linux Commands
      1. 4.1. The Shell Interface
        1. 4.1.1. Checking your login session
        2. 4.1.2. Checking directories and permissions
        3. 4.1.3. Checking system activity
        4. 4.1.4. Exiting the shell
      2. 4.2. Understanding the Shell
      3. 4.3. Using the Shell in Linux
        1. 4.3.1. Locating commands
        2. 4.3.2. Rerunning commands
          1. 4.3.2.1. Command-line editing
          2. 4.3.2.2. Command-line completion
          3. 4.3.2.3. Command-line recall
        3. 4.3.3. Connecting and expanding commands
          1. 4.3.3.1. Piping commands
          2. 4.3.3.2. Sequential commands
          3. 4.3.3.3. Background commands
          4. 4.3.3.4. Expanding commands
          5. 4.3.3.5. Expanding arithmetic expressions
          6. 4.3.3.6. Expanding variables
        4. 4.3.4. Using shell environment variables
          1. 4.3.4.1. Common shell environment variables
          2. 4.3.4.2. Setting your own environment variables
        5. 4.3.5. Managing background and foreground processes
          1. 4.3.5.1. Starting background processes
          2. 4.3.5.2. Moving commands to the foreground and background
        6. 4.3.6. Configuring your shell
          1. 4.3.6.1. Setting your prompt
          2. 4.3.6.2. Adding environment variables
          3. 4.3.6.3. Adding aliases
      4. 4.4. Working with the Linux File System
        1. 4.4.1. Creating files and directories
          1. 4.4.1.1. Using metacharacters and operators
          2. 4.4.1.2. Using file-matching metacharacters
          3. 4.4.1.3. Using file-redirection metacharacters
          4. 4.4.1.4. Understanding file permissions
        2. 4.4.2. Moving, copying, and deleting files
      5. 4.5. Using Text Editors
        1. 4.5.1. Using the vi text editor
          1. 4.5.1.1. Starting with vi
          2. 4.5.1.2. Moving around the file
          3. 4.5.1.3. Searching for text
          4. 4.5.1.4. Using numbers with commands
        2. 4.5.2. Using graphical text editors and notepads
      6. 4.6. Working with Virtual Terminals
        1. 4.6.1. Switching terminals with the screen program
      7. 4.7. Summary
  7. 2. Using Fedora
    1. 5. Accessing and Running Applications
      1. 5.1. Getting and Installing Software Packages
        1. 5.1.1. Downloading and installing applications with yum
          1. 5.1.1.1. Configuring yum (/etc/yum.conf)
          2. 5.1.1.2. Adding yum repositories (/etc/yum.repos.d/)
          3. 5.1.1.3. Running yum to download and install RPMs
          4. 5.1.1.4. Using yum to install packages locally
          5. 5.1.1.5. Removing packages with yum
          6. 5.1.1.6. Using yum for listing packages
          7. 5.1.1.7. Using yum-utils package
        2. 5.1.2. Getting Fedora software updates
          1. 5.1.2.1. Getting alerted to available updates
          2. 5.1.2.2. Getting manual updates with yum
      2. 5.2. Managing RPM Packages
        1. 5.2.1. Using the PackageKit Add/Remove window
        2. 5.2.2. Using the rpm command
          1. 5.2.2.1. Verifying rpm package integrity
          2. 5.2.2.2. Installing with rpm
          3. 5.2.2.3. Upgrading packages with rpm
          4. 5.2.2.4. Freshening packages with rpm
          5. 5.2.2.5. Removing packages with rpm
          6. 5.2.2.6. Querying packages with rpm
          7. 5.2.2.7. Verifying installed packages with rpm
        3. 5.2.3. Using RPM in rescue mode
      3. 5.3. Using Software in Different Formats
        1. 5.3.1. Understanding software package names and formats
        2. 5.3.2. Using different archive and document formats
        3. 5.3.3. Building and installing from source code
          1. 5.3.3.1. Installing software in SRPM format
          2. 5.3.3.2. Installing software in tar.gz or tar.bz2 formats
      4. 5.4. Using Fedora to Run Applications
        1. 5.4.1. Finding common desktop applications in Linux
        2. 5.4.2. Investigating your desktop
        3. 5.4.3. Starting applications from a menu
        4. 5.4.4. Starting applications from a Run Application window
        5. 5.4.5. Starting applications from a Terminal window
        6. 5.4.6. Running remote X applications
          1. 5.4.6.1. Traditional method to run remote X applications
          2. 5.4.6.2. Launching a remote X application
          3. 5.4.6.3. Using user-based security
          4. 5.4.6.4. Using SSH to run remote X applications
      5. 5.5. Running Microsoft Windows, DOS, and Macintosh Applications
        1. 5.5.1. Running DOS applications
          1. 5.5.1.1. Using mtools
          2. 5.5.1.2. Using DOSBox
        2. 5.5.2. Running Microsoft Windows applications in Linux
          1. 5.5.2.1. Running Windows Applications with WINE
          2. 5.5.2.2. Assigning drive letters
          3. 5.5.2.3. Installing applications in WINE
          4. 5.5.2.4. Launching applications
          5. 5.5.2.5. Tuning and configuring WINE
          6. 5.5.2.6. Finding more Windows applications for WINE
      6. 5.6. Summary
    2. 6. Publishing with Fedora
      1. 6.1. Desktop Publishing in Linux
        1. 6.1.1. Using word processors
          1. 6.1.1.1. Using OpenOffice.org
          2. 6.1.1.2. Other word processors
            1. 6.1.1.2.1. StarOffice
            2. 6.1.1.2.2. AbiWord
            3. 6.1.1.2.3. Using KOffice
            4. 6.1.1.2.4. TextMaker
      2. 6.2. Displaying PDF Files with Adobe Acrobat Reader
      3. 6.3. Using Traditional Linux Publishing Tools
        1. 6.3.1. Creating Documents in Groff or LaTeX
          1. 6.3.1.1. Text processing with Groff
          2. 6.3.1.2. Formatting and printing documents with Groff
          3. 6.3.1.3. Text processing with TeX/LaTeX
          4. 6.3.1.4. Creating and formatting a LaTeX document
        2. 6.3.2. Converting documents
        3. 6.3.3. Creating DocBook documents
      4. 6.4. Doing Page Layout with Scribus
      5. 6.5. Working with Graphics
        1. 6.5.1. Manipulating images with GIMP
        2. 6.5.2. Taking screen captures
        3. 6.5.3. Creating vector graphic images with Inkscape
      6. 6.6. Using Scanners Driven by SANE
      7. 6.7. Web Publishing
      8. 6.8. Summary
    3. 7. Music, Video, and Images in Linux
      1. 7.1. Understanding Multimedia and Legal Issues in Linux
      2. 7.2. Extending Freedom to Codecs
      3. 7.3. Listening to Music in Linux
        1. 7.3.1. Configuring a sound card
          1. 7.3.1.1. Sound card features
          2. 7.3.1.2. Detecting your sound card driver
          3. 7.3.1.3. Adjusting sound levels
          4. 7.3.1.4. Setting your sound card to record
        2. 7.3.2. Choosing audio players
        3. 7.3.3. Automatically playing CDs
        4. 7.3.4. Playing and managing music with Rhythmbox
        5. 7.3.5. Playing music with XMMS Audio Player
          1. 7.3.5.1. Using the Equalizer
          2. 7.3.5.2. Using the Playlist Editor
        6. 7.3.6. Using ogg123, mpg321, and play command-line players
        7. 7.3.7. Using MIDI audio players
        8. 7.3.8. Converting audio files with SoX
        9. 7.3.9. Extracting and encoding music
          1. 7.3.9.1. Extracting music CDs with Sound Juicer
          2. 7.3.9.2. Extracting and encoding music CDs from commands
        10. 7.3.10. Creating your own music CDs
          1. 7.3.10.1. Creating audio CDs with cdrecord
          2. 7.3.10.2. Creating audio and data CDs with K3b
            1. 7.3.10.2.1. Creating a new audio CD
            2. 7.3.10.2.2. Copying a CD
            3. 7.3.10.2.3. Burning an ISO image to CD
          3. 7.3.10.3. Creating audio and data CDs with Brasero
        11. 7.3.11. Creating CD labels with cdlabelgen
      4. 7.4. Viewing TV and Webcams
        1. 7.4.1. Watching TV with TVtime
          1. 7.4.1.1. Getting a supported TV card
          2. 7.4.1.2. Starting Tvtime
          3. 7.4.1.3. Selecting channels in TVtime
        2. 7.4.2. Video conferencing and VOIP with Ekiga
          1. 7.4.2.1. Getting a supported Webcam
          2. 7.4.2.2. Running Ekiga
        3. 7.4.3. Taking Webcam videos and snapshots with Cheese
      5. 7.5. Playing Video
        1. 7.5.1. Examining laws affecting video and Linux
        2. 7.5.2. Understanding video content types
        3. 7.5.3. Watching video with Xine
          1. 7.5.3.1. Using Xine
          2. 7.5.3.2. Creating playlists with Xine
          3. 7.5.3.3. Xine tips
        4. 7.5.4. Using Totem movie player
        5. 7.5.5. Using a digital camera
        6. 7.5.6. Displaying images in gThumb
        7. 7.5.7. Using your camera as a storage device
      6. 7.6. Playing Games on Linux
        1. 7.6.1. Jumping into Linux Gaming
        2. 7.6.2. Basic Linux Gaming Information
        3. 7.6.3. Where to get information on Linux gaming
      7. 7.7. Summary
    4. 8. Using the Internet and the Web
      1. 8.1. Overview of Internet Applications and Commands
      2. 8.2. Browsing the Web
        1. 8.2.1. Browsing the Web with Firefox
        2. 8.2.2. Setting up Firefox
          1. 8.2.2.1. Setting Navigator preferences
          2. 8.2.2.2. Extending Firefox
            1. 8.2.2.2.1. Using plug-ins
            2. 8.2.2.2.2. Getting add-ons
          3. 8.2.2.3. Changing Firefox themes
          4. 8.2.2.4. Securing Firefox
          5. 8.2.2.5. Tips for using Firefox
        3. 8.2.3. Using text-based Web browsers
      3. 8.3. Communicating with E-mail
        1. 8.3.1. Using Evolution e-mail
          1. 8.3.1.1. Setting Evolution preferences
          2. 8.3.1.2. Receiving, composing, and sending e-mail
        2. 8.3.2. Thunderbird mail client
        3. 8.3.3. Text-based mail programs
        4. 8.3.4. Mail readers and managers
          1. 8.3.4.1. Mutt mail reader
          2. 8.3.4.2. Mail reader
      4. 8.4. Participating in Newsgroups
      5. 8.5. Instant Messaging
        1. 8.5.1. Instant Messaging with Pidgin
        2. 8.5.2. Instant Messaging with Empathy
      6. 8.6. Sharing Files with BitTorrent
      7. 8.7. Using Remote Login, Copy, and Execution
        1. 8.7.1. Getting files with FTP
          1. 8.7.1.1. Using the lftp command
            1. 8.7.1.1.1. FTP directory commands
            2. 8.7.1.1.2. FTP file copying commands
            3. 8.7.1.1.3. FTP exiting commands
          2. 8.7.1.2. Using the ncftp command
            1. 8.7.1.2.1. Using ncftp
            2. 8.7.1.2.2. Using ncftp for background transfers
          3. 8.7.1.3. Using the gFTP window
        2. 8.7.2. Getting files with wget
          1. 8.7.2.1. Downloading a single file
          2. 8.7.2.2. Downloading a file with user name and password
          3. 8.7.2.3. Downloading a whole Web site
          4. 8.7.2.4. Continuing a download
        3. 8.7.3. Using ssh for remote login/remote execution
        4. 8.7.4. Using scp for remote file copy
        5. 8.7.5. Using the "r" commands: rlogin, rcp, and rsh
      8. 8.8. Summary
  8. 3. Administering Fedora
    1. 9. Understanding System Administration
      1. 9.1. Using the root user account
      2. 9.2. Becoming the Super User (The su Command)
      3. 9.3. Learning About Administrative GUI Tools, Commands, Configuration Files, and Log Files
        1. 9.3.1. Using graphical administration tools
        2. 9.3.2. Administrative commands
        3. 9.3.3. Administrative configuration files
        4. 9.3.4. Administrative log files
        5. 9.3.5. Using other administrative logins
          1. 9.3.5.1. Understanding administrative logins
          2. 9.3.5.2. Using sudo for assigning administrative privilege
          3. 9.3.5.3. Using PolicyKit for assigning administrative privilege
      4. 9.4. Administering Your Linux System
      5. 9.5. Configuring Hardware
        1. 9.5.1. Checking your hardware
        2. 9.5.2. Managing hardware with the DeviceKit
        3. 9.5.3. Configuring modules
          1. 9.5.3.1. Listing loaded modules
          2. 9.5.3.2. Loading modules
          3. 9.5.3.3. Removing modules
      6. 9.6. Managing File Systems and Disk Space
        1. 9.6.1. Mounting file systems
          1. 9.6.1.1. Supported file systems
          2. 9.6.1.2. Using the fstab file to define mountable file systems
          3. 9.6.1.3. Using the mount command to mount file systems
            1. 9.6.1.3.1. Mounting removable media
            2. 9.6.1.3.2. Mounting CD or DVD images
            3. 9.6.1.3.3. Mounting Windows file systems
          4. 9.6.1.4. Using the umount command to unmount a file system
        2. 9.6.2. Using the mkfs command to create a file system
        3. 9.6.3. Adding a hard disk
        4. 9.6.4. Using RAID disks
        5. 9.6.5. Checking system space
          1. 9.6.5.1. Checking Disk Space with Disk Usage Analyzer
          2. 9.6.5.2. Displaying system space with df
          3. 9.6.5.3. Checking disk usage with du
          4. 9.6.5.4. Finding disk consumption with find
      7. 9.7. Monitoring System Performance
        1. 9.7.1. Watch computer usage with System Monitor
        2. 9.7.2. Monitoring CPU usage with top
        3. 9.7.3. Monitoring power usage on laptop computers
          1. 9.7.3.1. Using the Power Manager applet
          2. 9.7.3.2. Using apm to enter suspend mode
          3. 9.7.3.3. Using acpi_listen to monitor ACPI events
      8. 9.8. Fixing Your System with the FirstAidKit
      9. 9.9. Choosing Software Alternatives
        1. 9.9.1. Selecting Java alternatives
        2. 9.9.2. Selecting mail alternatives
        3. 9.9.3. Using mail alternatives
      10. 9.10. Using Security Enhanced Linux
      11. 9.11. Understanding Security Enhanced Linux
        1. 9.11.1. Types and roles in SELinux
        2. 9.11.2. Users in SELinux
        3. 9.11.3. Policies in SELinux
        4. 9.11.4. Tools in SELinux
      12. 9.12. Using SELinux in Fedora
        1. 9.12.1. Getting SELinux
        2. 9.12.2. Checking whether SELinux is on
        3. 9.12.3. Checking SELinux status
      13. 9.13. Using SELinux
      14. 9.14. Learning More About SELinux
      15. 9.15. Summary
    2. 10. Setting Up and Supporting Users
      1. 10.1. Creating User Accounts
        1. 10.1.1. Adding users with useradd
        2. 10.1.2. Adding users with User Manager
      2. 10.2. Setting User Defaults
        1. 10.2.1. Supplying initial login scripts
        2. 10.2.2. Supplying initial .bashrc and .bash_profile files
        3. 10.2.3. Supplying an initial .tcshrc file
        4. 10.2.4. Configuring system-wide shell options
        5. 10.2.5. Configuring system-wide bash options
        6. 10.2.6. Configuring system-wide tcsh options
        7. 10.2.7. Setting system profiles
        8. 10.2.8. Adding user accounts to servers
      3. 10.3. Creating Portable Desktops
      4. 10.4. Providing Support to Users
        1. 10.4.1. Creating a technical support mailbox
        2. 10.4.2. Resetting a user's password
      5. 10.5. Modifying Accounts
        1. 10.5.1. Modifying user accounts with usermod
        2. 10.5.2. Modifying user accounts with User Manager
      6. 10.6. Deleting User Accounts
        1. 10.6.1. Deleting user accounts with userdel
        2. 10.6.2. Deleting user accounts with User Manager
      7. 10.7. Checking Disk Quotas
        1. 10.7.1. Using quota to check disk usage
        2. 10.7.2. Editing the /etc/fstab file
        3. 10.7.3. Creating quota files
        4. 10.7.4. Creating a quota startup script
        5. 10.7.5. Turn on the quota startup script
        6. 10.7.6. Creating quota rules
        7. 10.7.7. Updating quota settings
        8. 10.7.8. Checking quotas
        9. 10.7.9. Using du to check disk use
        10. 10.7.10. Removing temp files automatically
      8. 10.8. Sending Mail to All Users
      9. 10.9. Summary
    3. 11. Automating System Tasks
      1. 11.1. Understanding Shell Scripts
        1. 11.1.1. Executing and debugging shell scripts
        2. 11.1.2. Understanding shell variables
          1. 11.1.2.1. Special shell variables
          2. 11.1.2.2. Parameter expansion in bash
        3. 11.1.3. Performing arithmetic in shell scripts
        4. 11.1.4. Using programming constructs in shell scripts
          1. 11.1.4.1. The "if...then" statements
          2. 11.1.4.2. The case command
          3. 11.1.4.3. The "for...do" loop
          4. 11.1.4.4. The "while...do" and "until...do" loops
        5. 11.1.5. Some useful external programs
          1. 11.1.5.1. The general regular expression parser (grep)
          2. 11.1.5.2. Remove sections of lines of text (cut)
          3. 11.1.5.3. Translate or delete characters (tr)
          4. 11.1.5.4. The Stream Editor (sed)
        6. 11.1.6. Trying some simple shell scripts
          1. 11.1.6.1. A simple telephone list
          2. 11.1.6.2. A simple backup script
      2. 11.2. System Initialization
        1. 11.2.1. Starting init
        2. 11.2.2. The inittab file
      3. 11.3. System Startup and Shutdown
        1. 11.3.1. Starting run-level scripts
        2. 11.3.2. Understanding run-level scripts
        3. 11.3.3. Understanding what startup scripts do
        4. 11.3.4. Changing run-level script behavior
        5. 11.3.5. Reorganizing or removing run-level scripts
        6. 11.3.6. Adding run-level scripts
        7. 11.3.7. Managing xinetd services
        8. 11.3.8. Manipulating run levels
          1. 11.3.8.1. Determining the current run level
          2. 11.3.8.2. Changing to a shutdown run level
      4. 11.4. Scheduling System Tasks
        1. 11.4.1. Using at.allow and at.deny
        2. 11.4.2. Specifying when jobs are run
        3. 11.4.3. Submitting scheduled jobs
        4. 11.4.4. Viewing scheduled jobs
        5. 11.4.5. Deleting scheduled jobs
        6. 11.4.6. Using the batch command
        7. 11.4.7. Using the cron facility
          1. 11.4.7.1. Modifying scheduled tasks with crontab
          2. 11.4.7.2. Understanding cron files
      5. 11.5. Summary
    4. 12. Backing Up and Restoring Files
      1. 12.1. Making a Simple Backup Archive
      2. 12.2. Doing a Simple Backup with rsync
        1. 12.2.1. Backing up files locally
        2. 12.2.2. Backing up files remotely
      3. 12.3. Choosing Backup Tools
      4. 12.4. Selecting a Backup Strategy
        1. 12.4.1. Full backup
        2. 12.4.2. Incremental backup
        3. 12.4.3. Disk mirroring
        4. 12.4.4. Network backup
      5. 12.5. Selecting a Backup Medium
        1. 12.5.1. Magnetic tape
          1. 12.5.1.1. Using ftape tools for magnetic tape
          2. 12.5.1.2. Testing the magnetic tape drive
        2. 12.5.2. Writable CD drives
          1. 12.5.2.1. Getting cdrecord for writable CDs
          2. 12.5.2.2. Writing to CDs
        3. 12.5.3. Writable DVD drives
        4. 12.5.4. Writing CD or DVDs with growisofs
      6. 12.6. Backing Up to a Hard Drive
      7. 12.7. Backing Up Files with dump
        1. 12.7.1. Creating a backup with dump
        2. 12.7.2. Understanding dump levels
      8. 12.8. Automating Backups with cron
      9. 12.9. Restoring Backed-Up Files
        1. 12.9.1. Restoring an entire file system
        2. 12.9.2. Recovering individual files
      10. 12.10. Configuring Amanda for Network Backups
        1. 12.10.1. Creating Amanda directories
        2. 12.10.2. Creating the amanda.conf file
        3. 12.10.3. Creating a disklist file
        4. 12.10.4. Adding Amanda network services
          1. 12.10.4.1. On the amanda server
          2. 12.10.4.2. On each amanda client
        5. 12.10.5. Performing an Amanda backup
      11. 12.11. Using the pax Archiving Tool
      12. 12.12. Summary
    5. 13. Computer Security Issues
      1. 13.1. Linux Security Checklist
      2. 13.2. Using Password Protection
        1. 13.2.1. Choosing good passwords
        2. 13.2.2. Using a shadow password file
          1. 13.2.2.1. Breaking encrypted passwords
          2. 13.2.2.2. Checking for the shadow password file
      3. 13.3. Securing Linux with the iptables Firewall
        1. 13.3.1. Using the Firewall Configuration window
        2. 13.3.2. Configuring an iptables firewall
          1. 13.3.2.1. Turning on iptables
          2. 13.3.2.2. Creating iptables firewall rules
            1. 13.3.2.2.1. Example 1: Firewall for shared Internet connection (plus servers)
            2. 13.3.2.2.2. Example 2: Firewall for shared Internet connection (no servers)
            3. 13.3.2.2.3. Example 3: Firewall for single Linux system with Internet connection
          3. 13.3.2.3. Understanding iptables
            1. 13.3.2.3.1. Using iptables to do SNAT or IP Masquerading
            2. 13.3.2.3.2. Using iptables as a transparent proxy
            3. 13.3.2.3.3. Using iptables to do port forwarding
            4. 13.3.2.3.4. Using logging with iptables
          4. 13.3.2.4. Enhancing your iptables firewall
      4. 13.4. Controlling Access to Services with TCP Wrappers
      5. 13.5. Checking Log Files
        1. 13.5.1. Understanding the rsyslogd service
          1. 13.5.1.1. Redirecting logs to a loghost with rsyslogd
          2. 13.5.1.2. Understanding the messages logfile
        2. 13.5.2. Tracking log messages with logwatch
      6. 13.6. Using the Secure Shell Package
        1. 13.6.1. Starting the SSH service
        2. 13.6.2. Using the ssh, sftp, and scp commands
        3. 13.6.3. Using ssh, scp, and sftp without passwords
      7. 13.7. Securing Linux Servers
        1. 13.7.1. Understanding attack techniques
        2. 13.7.2. Protecting against denial-of-service attacks
          1. 13.7.2.1. Mailbombing
            1. 13.7.2.1.1. Blocking mail with Procmail
            2. 13.7.2.1.2. Blocking mail with sendmail
          2. 13.7.2.2. Spam relaying
          3. 13.7.2.3. Smurf amplification attack
        3. 13.7.3. Protecting against distributed DOS attacks
        4. 13.7.4. Protecting against intrusion attacks
          1. 13.7.4.1. Evaluating access to network services
          2. 13.7.4.2. Disabling network services
        5. 13.7.5. Securing servers with SELinux
        6. 13.7.6. Protecting Web servers with certificates and encryption
          1. 13.7.6.1. Symmetric cryptography
          2. 13.7.6.2. Public-key cryptography
          3. 13.7.6.3. Secure Sockets Layer
            1. 13.7.6.3.1. Creating SSL certificates
            2. 13.7.6.3.2. Using third-party certificate signers
            3. 13.7.6.3.3. Creating a Certificate Service Request
            4. 13.7.6.3.4. Getting the CSR signed
            5. 13.7.6.3.5. Creating self-signed certificates
            6. 13.7.6.3.6. Restarting your Web server
            7. 13.7.6.3.7. Troubleshooting your certificates
      8. 13.8. Managing Identities with FreeIPA
        1. 13.8.1. Setting up the FreeIPA server
        2. 13.8.2. Setting up FreeIPA clients
      9. 13.9. Summary
  9. 4. Fedora Network and Server Setup
    1. 14. Setting Up Network Connections and LANs
      1. 14.1. Connecting to the Network with NetworkManager
        1. 14.1.1. Connecting to a wireless network
        2. 14.1.2. Connecting to a wired network
        3. 14.1.3. Setting up a virtual private network connection
      2. 14.2. Understanding Local Area Networks
        1. 14.2.1. Planning, getting, and setting up LAN hardware
          1. 14.2.1.1. LAN equipment
          2. 14.2.1.2. LAN equipment setup
        2. 14.2.2. Configuring TCP/IP for your LAN
          1. 14.2.2.1. Identifying other computers (hosts and DNS)
          2. 14.2.2.2. Adding Windows computers to your LAN
      3. 14.3. Setting Up a Wireless LAN
        1. 14.3.1. Understanding wireless networks
        2. 14.3.2. Choosing wireless hardware
          1. 14.3.2.1. Selecting wireless LAN cards
          2. 14.3.2.2. Selecting antennas
            1. 14.3.2.2.1. Using indoor antennas
            2. 14.3.2.2.2. Using outdoor antennas
        3. 14.3.3. Getting wireless drivers
        4. 14.3.4. Installing wireless Linux software
        5. 14.3.5. Configuring the wireless LAN
          1. 14.3.5.1. Configuring the wireless interface
          2. 14.3.5.2. Checking your wireless connection
        6. 14.3.6. Testing distances
        7. 14.3.7. Setting wireless extensions
      4. 14.4. Understanding Internet Protocol Addresses
        1. 14.4.1. IP address classes
        2. 14.4.2. Understanding netmasks
        3. 14.4.3. Classless Inter-Domain Routing
        4. 14.4.4. Getting IP addresses
      5. 14.5. Troubleshooting Your LAN
        1. 14.5.1. Did Linux find your Ethernet driver at boot time?
        2. 14.5.2. Can you reach another computer on the LAN?
        3. 14.5.3. Is your Ethernet connection up?
        4. 14.5.4. Troubleshooting a wireless LAN
          1. 14.5.4.1. Checking wireless settings
          2. 14.5.4.2. Checking TCP/IP
          3. 14.5.4.3. Adapting to poor reception
          4. 14.5.4.4. Use debugging tools
        5. 14.5.5. Watching LAN traffic with Wireshark
          1. 14.5.5.1. Starting Wireshark
          2. 14.5.5.2. Capturing Ethernet data
          3. 14.5.5.3. Interpreting captured Ethernet data
      6. 14.6. Summary
    2. 15. Connecting to the Internet
      1. 15.1. Connecting Your LAN to the Internet
      2. 15.2. Setting Up Linux as a Router
        1. 15.2.1. Configuring the Linux router
          1. 15.2.1.1. Selecting IP addresses
          2. 15.2.1.2. Enable forwarding and masquerading
        2. 15.2.2. Configuring network clients
      3. 15.3. Configuring a Virtual Private Network Connection
        1. 15.3.1. Understanding IPsec
        2. 15.3.2. Using IPsec protocols
        3. 15.3.3. Using IPsec in Fedora
        4. 15.3.4. Configuring an OpenVPN Server
          1. 15.3.4.1. Decisions before configuring OpenVPN
          2. 15.3.4.2. Create a public key infrastructure
          3. 15.3.4.3. Create OpenVPN server configuration
          4. 15.3.4.4. Create OpenVPN client configuration
      4. 15.4. Setting Up Linux as a Proxy Server
        1. 15.4.1. Starting the squid daemon
        2. 15.4.2. Using a simple squid.conf file
        3. 15.4.3. Modifying the Squid configuration file
          1. 15.4.3.1. Configuring access control in squid.conf
          2. 15.4.3.2. Configuring caching in squid.conf
          3. 15.4.3.3. Configuring port numbers in squid.conf
        4. 15.4.4. Debugging Squid
          1. 15.4.4.1. Checking the squid.conf file
          2. 15.4.4.2. Checking Squid log files
          3. 15.4.4.3. Using the top command
      5. 15.5. Setting Up Proxy Clients
        1. 15.5.1. Configuring Firefox to use a proxy
        2. 15.5.2. Configuring other browsers to use a proxy
      6. 15.6. Summary
    3. 16. Setting Up Printers and Printing
      1. 16.1. Common UNIX Printing Service
      2. 16.2. Setting Up Printers
        1. 16.2.1. Using the Printer Configuration window
          1. 16.2.1.1. Configuring local printers
            1. 16.2.1.1.1. Adding a local printer
            2. 16.2.1.1.2. Editing a local printer
          2. 16.2.1.2. Configuring remote printers
            1. 16.2.1.2.1. Adding a remote CUPS printer
            2. 16.2.1.2.2. Adding a remote UNIX printer
            3. 16.2.1.2.3. Adding a Windows (SMB) printer
            4. 16.2.1.2.4. Adding a JetDirect printer
        2. 16.2.2. Using Web-based CUPS administration
        3. 16.2.3. Configuring the CUPS server (cupsd.conf)
        4. 16.2.4. Configuring CUPS printer options
      3. 16.3. Using Printing Commands
        1. 16.3.1. Using lpr to print
        2. 16.3.2. Listing status with lpc
        3. 16.3.3. Removing print jobs with lprm
      4. 16.4. Configuring Print Servers
        1. 16.4.1. Configuring a shared CUPS printer
        2. 16.4.2. Configuring a shared Samba printer
          1. 16.4.2.1. Understanding smb.conf for printing
      5. 16.5. Summary
    4. 17. Setting Up a File Server
      1. 17.1. Goals of Setting Up a File Server
      2. 17.2. Setting Up an NFS File Server
        1. 17.2.1. Sharing NFS file systems
          1. 17.2.1.1. Using the NFS Server Configuration window
          2. 17.2.1.2. Configuring the /etc/exports file
            1. 17.2.1.2.1. Hostnames in /etc/exports
            2. 17.2.1.2.2. Access options in /etc/exports
            3. 17.2.1.2.3. User mapping options in /etc/exports
          3. 17.2.1.3. Exporting the shared file systems
          4. 17.2.1.4. Starting the nfsd daemons
        2. 17.2.2. Using NFS file systems
          1. 17.2.2.1. Manually mounting an NFS file system
          2. 17.2.2.2. Automatically mounting an NFS file system
            1. 17.2.2.2.1. Mounting noauto file systems
            2. 17.2.2.2.2. Using mount options
          3. 17.2.2.3. Using autofs to mount NFS file systems on demand
        3. 17.2.3. Unmounting NFS file systems
        4. 17.2.4. Other cool things to do with NFS
      3. 17.3. Setting Up a Samba File Server
        1. 17.3.1. Getting and installing Samba
        2. 17.3.2. Configuring a simple Samba server
        3. 17.3.3. Configuring Samba with SWAT
          1. 17.3.3.1. Turning on SWAT
          2. 17.3.3.2. Starting with SWAT
          3. 17.3.3.3. Creating global Samba settings in SWAT
            1. 17.3.3.3.1. Base options
            2. 17.3.3.3.2. Security options
            3. 17.3.3.3.3. Logging options
            4. 17.3.3.3.4. Protocol options
            5. 17.3.3.3.5. Tuning options
            6. 17.3.3.3.6. Printing options
            7. 17.3.3.3.7. Browse options
            8. 17.3.3.3.8. WINS options
          4. 17.3.3.4. Configuring shared directories with SWAT
          5. 17.3.3.5. Checking your Samba setup with SWAT
        4. 17.3.4. Working with Samba files and commands
          1. 17.3.4.1. Editing the smb.conf file
          2. 17.3.4.2. Adding Samba users
          3. 17.3.4.3. Starting the Samba service
          4. 17.3.4.4. Testing your Samba permissions
          5. 17.3.4.5. Checking the status of shared directories
        5. 17.3.5. Setting up Samba clients
          1. 17.3.5.1. Using Samba shared directories from Linux
            1. 17.3.5.1.1. Using Samba from Nautilus
            2. 17.3.5.1.2. Mounting Samba directories in Linux
          2. 17.3.5.2. Using Samba shared directories from Windows
        6. 17.3.6. Troubleshooting your Samba server
          1. 17.3.6.1. Basic networking in place?
          2. 17.3.6.2. Samba service running?
          3. 17.3.6.3. Firewall or SELinux restricting access?
          4. 17.3.6.4. User passwords working?
      4. 17.4. Summary
    5. 18. Setting Up a Mail Server
      1. 18.1. Introducing SMTP and sendmail
      2. 18.2. Installing and Running sendmail
        1. 18.2.1. Starting sendmail
        2. 18.2.2. Other programs
        3. 18.2.3. Logging performed by sendmail
      3. 18.3. Configuring sendmail
        1. 18.3.1. Getting a domain name
        2. 18.3.2. Configuring basic sendmail settings (sendmail.mc)
        3. 18.3.3. Defining outgoing mail access
        4. 18.3.4. Configuring virtual servers
        5. 18.3.5. Configuring virtual users
        6. 18.3.6. Adding user accounts
        7. 18.3.7. Starting sendmail and generating database files
        8. 18.3.8. Redirecting mail
          1. 18.3.8.1. The .forward file
          2. 18.3.8.2. The aliases file
      4. 18.4. Introducing Postfix
      5. 18.5. Stopping Spam with SpamAssassin
        1. 18.5.1. Using SpamAssassin
        2. 18.5.2. Setting up SpamAssassin on your mail server
        3. 18.5.3. Setting e-mail readers to filter spam
      6. 18.6. Getting Mail from the Server (POP3 or IMAPv4)
        1. 18.6.1. Accessing mailboxes in Linux
        2. 18.6.2. Configuring IMAPv4 and POP3 with dovecot
      7. 18.7. Getting Mail from Your Browser with SquirrelMail
      8. 18.8. Administering a Mailing List with mailman
      9. 18.9. Summary
    6. 19. Setting Up an FTP Server
      1. 19.1. Understanding FTP Servers
        1. 19.1.1. Attributes of FTP servers
        2. 19.1.2. FTP user types
      2. 19.2. Using the Very Secure FTP Server
        1. 19.2.1. Quick-starting vsFTPd
        2. 19.2.2. Securing vsFTPd
        3. 19.2.3. Configuring vsFTPd
          1. 19.2.3.1. User accounts
          2. 19.2.3.2. Setting FTP access
            1. 19.2.3.2.1. Downloading files
            2. 19.2.3.2.2. Uploading (writing) files from local users
            3. 19.2.3.2.3. Uploading (writing) files from anonymous users
          3. 19.2.3.3. Adding message files
          4. 19.2.3.4. Logging vsFTPd activities
          5. 19.2.3.5. Setting timeouts
          6. 19.2.3.6. Navigating a vsFTPd site
          7. 19.2.3.7. Setting up vsFTPd behind a firewall
      3. 19.3. Getting More Information About FTP Servers
      4. 19.4. Summary
    7. 20. Setting Up a Web Server
      1. 20.1. Introducing Web Servers
        1. 20.1.1. The Apache Web server
        2. 20.1.2. Other Web servers available for Fedora
      2. 20.2. Quick-Starting the Apache Web Server
      3. 20.3. Configuring the Apache Server
        1. 20.3.1. Configuring the Web server (httpd.conf)
          1. 20.3.1.1. Setting the global environment
            1. 20.3.1.1.1. Revealing subcomponents
            2. 20.3.1.1.2. Setting the server root directory
            3. 20.3.1.1.3. Storing the server's PID file
            4. 20.3.1.1.4. Configuring timeout values
          2. 20.3.1.2. Setting the number of server processes
          3. 20.3.1.3. Binding to specific addresses
          4. 20.3.1.4. Selecting modules in httpd.conf
          5. 20.3.1.5. Including module-specific configuration files
          6. 20.3.1.6. Choosing the server's user and group
          7. 20.3.1.7. Setting the main server's configuration
            1. 20.3.1.7.1. Setting an e-mail address
            2. 20.3.1.7.2. Setting the server name
            3. 20.3.1.7.3. Setting canonical names
            4. 20.3.1.7.4. Identifying HTTP content directories
            5. 20.3.1.7.5. Setting access options and overrides
          8. 20.3.1.8. Identifying user directories
          9. 20.3.1.9. Setting default index files for directories
            1. 20.3.1.9.1. Setting directory-access control
            2. 20.3.1.9.2. Setting MIME type defaults
            3. 20.3.1.9.3. Setting hostname lookups
            4. 20.3.1.9.4. Configuring HTTP logging
            5. 20.3.1.9.5. Adding a signature
            6. 20.3.1.9.6. Aliasing relocated content
            7. 20.3.1.9.7. Redirecting requests for old content
          10. 20.3.1.10. Defining indexing
          11. 20.3.1.11. Defining encoding and language
          12. 20.3.1.12. Choosing character sets
          13. 20.3.1.13. Adding MIME types and handlers
          14. 20.3.1.14. Defining actions and headers
          15. 20.3.1.15. Customizing error responses
          16. 20.3.1.16. Setting responses to browsers
          17. 20.3.1.17. Enabling proxy and caching services
          18. 20.3.1.18. Configuring virtual hosting
        2. 20.3.2. Configuring modules and related services (/etc/httpd/conf.d/*.conf)
      4. 20.4. Starting and Stopping the Server
      5. 20.5. Monitoring Server Activities
        1. 20.5.1. Displaying server information
        2. 20.5.2. Displaying server status
        3. 20.5.3. Further security of server-info and server-status
        4. 20.5.4. Logging errors
        5. 20.5.5. Logging hits
        6. 20.5.6. Analyzing Web-server traffic
      6. 20.6. Summary
    8. 21. Setting Up an LDAP Address Book Server
      1. 21.1. Understanding LDAP
        1. 21.1.1. Defining information in schemas
        2. 21.1.2. Structuring your LDAP directories
      2. 21.2. Setting Up the OpenLDAP Server
        1. 21.2.1. Installing OpenLDAP packages
        2. 21.2.2. Configuring the OpenLDAP server (slapd.conf)
        3. 21.2.3. Starting the OpenLDAP service
      3. 21.3. Setting Up the Address Book
      4. 21.4. More Ways to Configure LDAP
      5. 21.5. Accessing an LDAP Address Book from Thunderbird
      6. 21.6. Summary
    9. 22. Setting Up a DHCP Server
      1. 22.1. Using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
      2. 22.2. Setting Up a DHCP Server
        1. 22.2.1. Opening your firewall and SELinux for DHCP
        2. 22.2.2. Configuring the /etc/dhcp/dhcpd.conf file
          1. 22.2.2.1. Expanding the dhcpd.conf file
          2. 22.2.2.2. Adding options
        3. 22.2.3. Starting the DHCP server
      3. 22.3. Setting Up a DHCP Client
      4. 22.4. Summary
    10. 23. Setting Up a MySQL Database Server
      1. 23.1. Finding MySQL Packages
      2. 23.2. Starting the MySQL Server
      3. 23.3. Checking That MySQL Server Is Working
      4. 23.4. Getting More MySQL Packages
      5. 23.5. Configuring the MySQL Server
        1. 23.5.1. Using mysql user/group accounts
        2. 23.5.2. Adding administrative users
        3. 23.5.3. Setting MySQL options
          1. 23.5.3.1. Creating the my.cnf configuration file
          2. 23.5.3.2. Choosing options
          3. 23.5.3.3. Checking options
        4. 23.5.4. Using sample my.cnf files
      6. 23.6. Working with MySQL Databases
        1. 23.6.1. Starting the mysql command
        2. 23.6.2. Creating a database with mysql
        3. 23.6.3. Adding data to a MySQL database table
          1. 23.6.3.1. Manually entering data
          2. 23.6.3.2. Loading data from a file
      7. 23.7. Understanding MySQL Tables
      8. 23.8. Displaying MySQL Databases
        1. 23.8.1. Displaying all or selected records
        2. 23.8.2. Displaying selected columns
        3. 23.8.3. Sorting data
      9. 23.9. Making Changes to Tables and Records
        1. 23.9.1. Altering the structure of MySQL tables
        2. 23.9.2. Updating and deleting MySQL records
      10. 23.10. Adding and Removing User Access
        1. 23.10.1. Adding users and granting access
        2. 23.10.2. Revoking access
      11. 23.11. Backing Up Databases
      12. 23.12. Checking and Fixing Databases
      13. 23.13. Summary
    11. 24. Making Servers Public with DNS
      1. 24.1. Determining Goals for Your Server
        1. 24.1.1. Using a hosting service
      2. 24.2. Connecting a Public Server
        1. 24.2.1. Choosing an ISP
          1. 24.2.1.1. Checking Terms of Service
          2. 24.2.1.2. Getting static IP addresses
          3. 24.2.1.3. Choosing a connection speed
        2. 24.2.2. Getting a domain name
          1. 24.2.2.1. Checking domain name availability
          2. 24.2.2.2. Reserving a domain name
      3. 24.3. Configuring Your Public Server
        1. 24.3.1. Configuring networking
        2. 24.3.2. Configuring servers
        3. 24.3.3. Managing security
          1. 24.3.3.1. Opening your firewall
          2. 24.3.3.2. Enabling SELinux
          3. 24.3.3.3. Checking logs and system files
          4. 24.3.3.4. Keeping up with updates
      4. 24.4. Setting Up a Domain Name System Server
        1. 24.4.1. Understanding DNS
          1. 24.4.1.1. Understanding authoritative zones
          2. 24.4.1.2. Understanding DNS risks
          3. 24.4.1.3. Understanding BIND
        2. 24.4.2. DNS name server example
        3. 24.4.3. Quick-starting a DNS server
          1. 24.4.3.1. Identifying your DNS servers
          2. 24.4.3.2. Creating DNS configuration files (named.conf and var/named)
            1. 24.4.3.2.1. Editing named.conf
            2. 24.4.3.2.2. Setting up the zone files (inside)
            3. 24.4.3.2.3. Setting up the zone files (outside)
            4. 24.4.3.2.4. Setting up the zone files (reverse lookup)
          3. 24.4.3.3. Starting the named (DNS) daemon
        4. 24.4.4. Checking that DNS is working
      5. 24.5. Getting More Information about BIND
      6. 24.6. Summary
    12. 25. Setting Up Virtual Servers
      1. 25.1. Preparing for Virtualization
        1. 25.1.1. Checking computer resources for virtualization
        2. 25.1.2. Installing KVM packages
        3. 25.1.3. Starting the Virtualization Service (libvirtd)
        4. 25.1.4. Getting installation media
      2. 25.2. Creating Virtual Guest Systems
      3. 25.3. Managing Virtual Guest Systems
        1. 25.3.1. Viewing and using guests
        2. 25.3.2. Cloning guests
      4. 25.4. Using Command-Line Tools to Manage Virtual Guests
        1. 25.4.1. Creating and converting storage volumes
          1. 25.4.1.1. Getting information about a storage volume
          2. 25.4.1.2. Creating a storage volume
          3. 25.4.1.3. Converting a storage volume
        2. 25.4.2. Creating virtual guests with virt-install
        3. 25.4.3. Managing virtual guests with virsh
      5. 25.5. Summary
    13. A. About the Media
      1. A.1. Fedora Source Code
    14. B. Running Network Services
      1. B.1. Checklist for Running Networking Services
      2. B.2. Networking Service Daemons
        1. B.2.1. The xinetd super-server
        2. B.2.2. The init.d startup scripts
      3. B.3. Choosing Alternatives
      4. B.4. Referencing Network Services
        1. B.4.1. Web server
        2. B.4.2. File servers
          1. B.4.2.1. FTP servers
          2. B.4.2.2. Samba server
        3. B.4.3. Login servers
        4. B.4.4. E-mail servers
        5. B.4.5. News server
        6. B.4.6. Print servers
        7. B.4.7. Network administration servers
          1. B.4.7.1. Network Time Protocol server
          2. B.4.7.2. Portmap server
          3. B.4.7.3. SWAT
          4. B.4.7.4. Arpwatch server
          5. B.4.7.5. Simple Network Management Protocol server
        8. B.4.8. Information servers
          1. B.4.8.1. Network Information System servers
          2. B.4.8.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server
          3. B.4.8.3. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol server
          4. B.4.8.4. Domain Name System server
          5. B.4.8.5. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol server
        9. B.4.9. Database services
        10. B.4.10. User services
          1. B.4.10.1. Talk server
          2. B.4.10.2. Finger server
          3. B.4.10.3. Remote user identification
          4. B.4.10.4. Write-to-All server
          5. B.4.10.5. Security services
          6. B.4.10.6. System logging
          7. B.4.10.7. Virtual private network servers
          8. B.4.10.8. Proxy/caching server
      5. B.5. Network Services Reference