O'Reilly logo

Extending MFC Applications with the .NET Framework by Nishant Sivakumar, Tom Archer

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Using Asymmetric (Public) Key Encryption

Asymmetric key encryption makes use of two distinct keys:: a private key and a public key. Both keys are generated at the same time and are mathematically linked. The private key is kept with the key's owner (typically the data's intended recipient), and the public key is given out to entities having authorization to encrypt and send data to the recipient. As the two keys are intrinsically matched, any data encrypted using the private key can only be decrypted using its corresponding public key, and any data encrypted using the public key can only be decrypted using the private key. Two of the most popular public key algorithms are RSA and DSA, of which DSA is used for making digital signatures and not ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required