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EXPOSURE PHOTO WORKSHOP

Book Description

Named One of Shutterbug Magazines Top Digital Imaging Books of 2008!

Capturing an image and getting the right exposure is critical and Jeff Wignall recognizes exposure as the secret for creating an image that captures a vision and shares it with the world. When you apply his techniques with patience, experimentation, and a focus on the outcome, you will begin creating images that reveal not only what you saw, but how you felt when you saw it. In fact according to Shutterbug magazine Exposure Photo Workshop “may be the best book yet written about exposure.” By learning to work with natural light as well as when to use flash you will confidently capture action, night scenes, rainbows, sunsets, and reflections like never before. With stunning images, Jeff Wignall shows you how to perfectly expose pictures in even the most challenging existing light conditions, including poor weather, using a flash, and even a section guiding you through using multiple wireless flash units. You can upload your own images to Photoworkshop.com and get feedback from other photographers.

Wignall starts by explaining the fundamentals of exposure and why it’s important. This leads into learning the basics of exposure controls. By the end of chapter 2, you will know how to control the exposure on your point-and-shoot or digital SLR camera. Chapter 3 walks readers through measuring light using just about any light meter and Chapter 4 delves into lens apertures and depth of field. The focus moves to shutter speed and subject motion. After Chapter 6, you’ll have the knowledge and confidence to turn off your camera’s automatic settings and take manual control. Wignall then examines natural light exposures, discussing the intricacies of light quality, light direction, and time of day. As you approach more advanced exposure options, you’ll need the troubleshooting advice provided in Chapter 8, covering difficult situations such as metering challenges, handling contrast, and creating dramatic silhouettes. With more advanced techniques mastered, you can then approach night and low-light conditions and then examine special considerations such as the weather and natural phenomena. The book finishes strong with a comprehensive look at all things flash photography.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About the Author
  3. Credits
  4. Acknowledgments
  5. Introduction
  6. 1. THE ART OF THE EXPOSURE
    1. 1.1. WHAT IS EXPOSURE AND WHY DOES IT MATTER
    2. 1.2. RECOGNIZING A GOOD EXPOSURE
    3. 1.3. TAKING CHARGE OF YOUR EXPOSURES
    4. 1.4. THE MYTH OF THE CORRECT EXPOSURE
      1. 1.4.1. VISUALIZING THE EXPOSURE YOU WANT
      2. 1.4.2. HUMAN VISION VERSUS CAMERA VISION
    5. 1.5. EXPOSURE AND MOOD
  7. 2. EXPOSURE CONTROLS: A PRIMER
    1. 2.1. GOOD EXPOSURES WITH ANY CAMERA
      1. 2.1.1. POINT-AND-SHOOT CAMERAS
      2. 2.1.2. ADVANCED ZOOM CAMERAS
      3. 2.1.3. DSLR CAMERAS
    2. 2.2. ESSENTIAL EXPOSURE CONTROLS
      1. 2.2.1. ISO SPEED
      2. 2.2.2. LENS APERTURE
      3. 2.2.3. SHUTTER SPEED
    3. 2.3. EQUIVALENT EXPOSURE SETTINGS
  8. 3. MEASURING THE LIGHT
    1. 3.1. HOW LIGHT METERS WORK
    2. 3.2. TTL METERS
      1. 3.2.1. MATRIX METERS
      2. 3.2.2. CENTER-WEIGHTED METERS
      3. 3.2.3. SPOT METERING
    3. 3.3. HANDHELD METERS
      1. 3.3.1. REFLECTED-LIGHT METERS
      2. 3.3.2. INCIDENT-LIGHT METERS
      3. 3.3.3. SPOT METERS
    4. 3.4. A WORLD OF GRAYS
      1. 3.4.1. SITUATIONS THAT FOOL METERS
      2. 3.4.2. METERING SHORTCUTS
    5. 3.5. THE ZONE SYSTEM
      1. 3.5.1. EXPOSURE COMPENSATION
      2. 3.5.2. EXPOSURE LOCK
      3. 3.5.3. MANUAL EXPOSURE
      4. 3.5.4. BRACKETING
  9. 4. LENS APERTURES AND DEPTH OF FIELD
    1. 4.1. A REALLY EASY LESSON IN APERTURE TERMINOLOGY
      1. 4.1.1. THE F-STOP NUMBERING SYSTEM
      2. 4.1.2. WHERE THE NUMBERS COME FROM
      3. 4.1.3. LENS SPEED
      4. 4.1.4. CONSTANT VERSUS VARIABLE-MAXIMUM APERTURES
      5. 4.1.5. AUTOMATIC LENS DIAPHRAGMS
    2. 4.2. THE CREATIVE POWER OF DEPTH OF FIELD
    3. 4.3. DEPTH OF FIELD FACTORS
      1. 4.3.1. APERTURE
      2. 4.3.2. LENS FOCAL LENGTH
      3. 4.3.3. SUBJECT DISTANCE
    4. 4.4. DEPTH OF FIELD AND COMPACT DIGITAL CAMERAS
    5. 4.5. DEPTH OF FIELD AND MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY
    6. 4.6. WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS USE A TRIPOD
  10. 5. SHUTTER SPEED AND SUBJECT MOTION
    1. 5.1. THE SHUTTER SPEED PROGRESSION
    2. 5.2. MANIPULATING MOTION: THE CREATIVE POWER OF SHUTTER SPEED
      1. 5.2.1. STOPPING TIME WITH FAST SHUTTER SPEEDS
      2. 5.2.2. EXAGGERATING MOTION
    3. 5.3. LONG SHUTTER SPEEDS AND DIMLY LIT INTERIORS
  11. 6. TRAINING WHEELS OFF: GOING BEYOND THE GREEN MODE
    1. 6.1. THE PRIMARY EXPOSURE-CONTROL MODES
      1. 6.1.1. AUTOMATIC AND PROGRAMMED MODES
      2. 6.1.2. APERTURE-PRIORITY MODE
      3. 6.1.3. SHUTTER-PRIORITY MODE
      4. 6.1.4. MANUAL-EXPOSURE MODE
    2. 6.2. SCENE MODES
  12. 7. NATURAL LIGHT EXPOSURES
    1. 7.1. A DAYLIGHT PRIMER
    2. 7.2. WHITE BALANCE AND THE COLOR OF DAYLIGHT
    3. 7.3. LIGHTING DIRECTION
      1. 7.3.1. FRONT LIGHTING
      2. 7.3.2. TOP LIGHTING
      3. 7.3.3. SIDELIGHTING
      4. 7.3.4. BACKLIGHTING
    4. 7.4. QUALITY OF LIGHT
      1. 7.4.1. HARD LIGHT
      2. 7.4.2. DIFFUSE LIGHT
      3. 7.4.3. HEAVY OVERCAST
    5. 7.5. TIME OF DAY
      1. 7.5.1. DAWN AND TWILIGHT
      2. 7.5.2. MIDDAY LIGHTING
      3. 7.5.3. THE GOLDEN HOURS
  13. 8. THE EASY WAY OUT: SIMPLIFYING DIFFICULT SITUATIONS
    1. 8.1. METERING CHALLENGES
      1. 8.1.1. LIGHT SUBJECTS, DARK BACKGROUNDS
      2. 8.1.2. DARK SUBJECTS, LIGHT BACKGROUNDS
      3. 8.1.3. BRILLIANT SUBJECTS AND WHITES WITH DETAIL
      4. 8.1.4. DARK AND LOW-KEY SUBJECTS
      5. 8.1.5. HIGH-KEY SCENES
      6. 8.1.6. DAPPLED DAYLIGHT
      7. 8.1.7. STRONG COLOR CONTRASTS
    2. 8.2. HANDLING CONTRAST
    3. 8.3. CREATING DRAMATIC SILHOUETTES
    4. 8.4. HISTOGRAMS: A VISUAL AID FOR SEEING CONTRAST
  14. 9. PHOTOGRAPHY AFTER DARK AND IN EXISTING LIGHT
    1. 9.1. CONSIDERATIONS FOR NIGHT SHOOTING
      1. 9.1.1. LONG EXPOSURES VERSUS HIGHER ISO
      2. 9.1.2. FAST LENS VERSUS HIGHER ISO
      3. 9.1.3. COLOR TEMPERATURE CONSIDERATIONS
      4. 9.1.4. TRY CAMERA RAW FORMAT
      5. 9.1.5. DON'T BE AFRAID TO USE THE FLASH
      6. 9.1.6. METERING NIGHT SCENES
      7. 9.1.7. HALATION
      8. 9.1.8. A WORD ABOUT SHARPNESS
    2. 9.2. A WORLD OF NIGHTTIME SUBJECTS
      1. 9.2.1. TRAFFIC STREAKS
      2. 9.2.2. NEON SIGNS
      3. 9.2.3. CARNIVAL LIGHTS
      4. 9.2.4. CITY SKYLINES
      5. 9.2.5. CITY STREET SCENES
      6. 9.2.6. NIGHT MARKETS
      7. 9.2.7. SPOTLIT BUILDINGS
      8. 9.2.8. SPARKLERS AND TIME EXPOSURES
      9. 9.2.9. FIREWORKS DISPLAYS
  15. 10. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: WEATHER AND NATURAL PHENOMENA
    1. 10.1. CHANGES IN WEATHER
      1. 10.1.1. FOG AND MIST
      2. 10.1.2. RAINY DAYS
      3. 10.1.3. STORMY SKIES
      4. 10.1.4. RAINBOWS
    2. 10.2. AUTUMN SCENES
    3. 10.3. SUNSETS AND SUNRISES
  16. 11. FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY
    1. 11.1. FLASH 101
      1. 11.1.1. TTL FLASH
      2. 11.1.2. BUILT-IN FLASH: ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES
      3. 11.1.3. ACCESSORY FLASH
      4. 11.1.4. ACCESSORY FLASH ADVANTAGES
      5. 11.1.5. ACCESSORY FLASH DISADVANTAGES
      6. 11.1.6. DEDICATED FLASH
      7. 11.1.7. A MINI PRIMER ON FLASH GUIDE NUMBERS
      8. 11.1.8. BOUNCE FLASH
      9. 11.1.9. BOUNCE REFLECTORS
    2. 11.2. FLASH MODES AND TECHNIQUES
      1. 11.2.1. FILL-IN FLASH
      2. 11.2.2. FLASH-FILL COLOR BALANCE
      3. 11.2.3. NIGHT SCENES OR NIGHT SCENES/PORTRAIT MODE
      4. 11.2.4. CLOSE-UP MODE
      5. 11.2.5. RED-EYE REDUCTION MODE
      6. 11.2.6. FLASH OFF
    3. 11.3. ADVANCEDTECHNIQUE: WIRELESS MULTIPLE FLASH
  17. GLOSSARY