O'Reilly logo

Excel 2003: The Missing Manual by Matthew MacDonald

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Performing List Calculations

Excel 2003 data lists are particularly useful when you're adding new columns that contain calculations. For example, say you've got a list with three columns: Product ID, Model Name, and Price. If you want to add a new column that tracks the discounted price of each product (say, 90 percent of the regular price), a data list is a great timesaver. Once you've created the new discount price column, Excel has the smarts to automatically insert the formula into every new record you add, as shown in Figure 13-12. Sadly, this convenience isn't offered to Excel 2002 users (although they can still get the job done with the Copy and Paste commands).

This worksheet shows a new item in the process of being entered. Even though only the Product ID has been entered so far, Excel automatically inserted the formula for calculating the discount price (in cell D7).

Figure 13-12. This worksheet shows a new item in the process of being entered. Even though only the Product ID has been entered so far, Excel automatically inserted the formula for calculating the discount price (in cell D7).

Note

The following sections describe a couple of conveniences that Excel 2002 doesn't provide. If you're using Excel 2002, skip ahead to the last two sections, Section 13.4.3 and Section 13.4.4. Both those features, you'll be happy to know, work equally well in Excel 2002.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required