You are previewing Enterprise Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing.
O'Reilly logo
Enterprise Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing

Book Description

Corporations and governmental agencies of all sizes are embracing a new generation of enterprise-scale business intelligence (BI) and data warehousing (DW), and very often appoint a single senior-level individual to serve as the Enterprise BI/DW Program Manager. This book is the essential guide to the incremental and iterative build-out of a successful enterprise-scale BI/DW program comprised of multiple underlying projects, and what the Enterprise Program Manager must successfully accomplish to orchestrate the many moving parts in the quest for true enterprise-scale business intelligence and data warehousing.

Author Alan Simon has served as an enterprise business intelligence and data warehousing program management advisor to many of his clients, and spent an entire year with a single client as the adjunct consulting director for a $10 million enterprise data warehousing (EDW) initiative. He brings a wealth of knowledge about best practices, risk management, organizational culture alignment, and other Critical Success Factors (CSFs) to the discipline of enterprise-scale business intelligence and data warehousing.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. About the author
  6. Preface
  7. Chapter 1: The Challenge of Managing and Leading the Enterprise BI/DW Program
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. The challenges of enterprise-scale bi and data warehousing
    4. Why we can be successful in today’s and tomorrow’s ebi/edw efforts
    5. Looking ahead: the ebi/edw program manager
  8. Chapter 2: The Role and Charter of the Enterprise Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing Program Manager
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. The program manager job description
    4. Organizational reporting relationship
    5. The program management team
    6. When a multilayered program management team is necessary
    7. Looking ahead: the project portfolio
  9. Chapter 3: Building the EBI/EDW Program’s Initial Project Portfolio
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Identifying the program’s portfolio of projects: alternatives and recommendations
    4. The project portfolio “metadata”
    5. Looking ahead: refining the ebi/edw project portfolio
  10. Chapter 4: Putting the Finishing Touches on the EBI/EDW Program’s Project Portfolio
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Identifying overlapping capabilities and potential economies of scale
    4. Prioritizing the list of portfolio projects
    5. Finalizing the program’s architecture
    6. Updating and finalizing the program budget
    7. Risk mitigation and contingency planning
    8. Preparing the program time line and project work plans
    9. Conducting the Critical Design and Schedule Review
    10. Securing buy-in and sponsorship
    11. Looking ahead: risk mitigation and contingency planning
  11. Chapter 5: Program-Level Risk Management
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Technology and architecture
    4. “Many moving parts” interdependencies
    5. Apathetic and detached leadership
    6. Nondedicated resources
    7. Delayed budget cuts
    8. New and conflicting data marts
    9. New players
    10. Adversaries
    11. Looking ahead: program KPIs and KOIs
  12. Chapter 6: Program Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and Key Operating Indicators (KOIs)
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Measuring for success
    4. A KPI/KOI starter kit
    5. The “voice of the crowd”
    6. Looking ahead: conducting the quarterly program review
  13. Chapter 7: Conducting the Quarterly EBI/EDW Program Review
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Why conduct a quarterly program review?
    4. The program management review agenda
    5. Looking ahead: considerations for the Big Data era
  14. Chapter 8: Considerations for the Big Data Era
    1. Abstract
    2. Chapter introduction
    3. Technology and architecture
    4. Business-facing functionality
    5. Organizational structure