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Engineering Design: A Project-Based Introduction, Fourth Edition

Book Description

Dym, Little and Orwin's successful client-driven, team-based approach to engineering design gets students actively involved with conceptual design methods and project management tools. The book helps students acquire design skills as they experience the activity of design by doing design projects. It is equally suitable for use in project-based first-year courses, formal engineering design courses, and capstone project courses.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication
  5. Contents
  6. Foreword
  7. PREFACE
    1. SOME REMARKS ON VOCABULARY AND WORD USAGE
    2. SOME SPECIFICS ABOUT WHAT'S COVERED
    3. DESIGN CASE STUDY AND INTEGRATIVE DESIGN EXAMPLES
  8. Acknowledgments
  9. PART I: INTRODUCTION
    1. CHAPTER 1: ENGINEERING DESIGN
      1. 1.1 WHERE AND WHEN DO ENGINEERS DESIGN?
      2. 1.2 A BASIC VOCABULARY FOR ENGINEERING DESIGN
      3. 1.3 LEARNING AND DOING ENGINEERING DESIGN
      4. 1.4 MANAGING ENGINEERING DESIGN PROJECTS
      5. 1.5 NOTES
    2. CHAPTER 2: DEFINING A DESIGN PROCESS AND A CASE STUDY
      1. 2.1 THE DESIGN PROCESS AS A PROCESS OF QUESTIONING
      2. 2.2 DESCRIBING AND PRESCRIBING A DESIGN PROCESS
      3. 2.3 INFORMING A DESIGN PROCESS
      4. 2.4 CASE STUDY: DESIGN OF A STABILIZER FOR MICROLARYNGEAL SURGERY
      5. 2.5 ILLUSTRATIVE DESIGN EXAMPLES
      6. 2.6 NOTES
  10. PART II: THE DESIGN PROCESS AND DESIGN TOOLS
    1. CHAPTER 3: PROBLEM DEFINITION: DETAILING CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS
      1. 3.1 CLARIFYING THE INITIAL PROBLEM STATEMENT
      2. 3.2 FRAMING CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS
      3. 3.3 REVISED PROBLEM STATEMENTS: PUBLIC STATEMENTS OF THE DESIGN PROJECT
      4. 3.4 DESIGNING AN ARM SUPPORT FOR A CP-AFFLICTED STUDENT
      5. 3.5 NOTES
    2. CHAPTER 4: PROBLEM DEFINITION: CLARIFYING THE OBJECTIVES
      1. 4.1 CLARIFYING A CLIENT'S OBJECTIVES
      2. 4.2 MEASUREMENT ISSUES IN ORDERING AND EVALUATING OBJECTIVES
      3. 4.3 RANK ORDERING OBJECTIVES WITH PAIRWISE COMPARISON CHARTS
      4. 4.4 DEVELOPING METRICS TO MEASURE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF OBJECTIVES
      5. 4.5 OBJECTIVES AND METRICS FOR THE DANBURYARM SUPPORT
      6. 4.6 NOTES
    3. CHAPTER 5: PROBLEM DEFINITION: IDENTIFYING CONSTRAINTS
      1. 5.1 IDENTIFYING AND SETTING THE CLIENT'S LIMITS
      2. 5.2 DISPLAYING AND USING CONSTRAINTS
      3. 5.3 CONSTRAINTS FOR THE DANBURYARM SUPPORT
      4. 5.4 NOTES
    4. CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM DEFINITION: ESTABLISHING FUNCTIONS
      1. 6.1 ESTABLISHING FUNCTIONS
      2. 6.2 FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS: TOOLS FOR ESTABLISHING FUNCTIONS
      3. 6.3 DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS: SPECIFYING FUNCTIONS, FEATURES, AND BEHAVIOR
      4. 6.4 FUNCTIONS FOR THE DANBURY ARM SUPPORT
      5. 6.5 NOTES
    5. CHAPTER 7: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: GENERATING DESIGN ALTERNATIVES
      1. 7.1 GENERATING THE “DESIGN SPACE,” A SPACE OF ENGINEERING DESIGNS
      2. 7.2 NAVIGATING, EXPANDING, AND CONTRACTING DESIGN SPACES
      3. 7.3 GENERATING DESIGNS FOR THE DANBURYARM SUPPORT
      4. 7.4 NOTES
    6. CHAPTER 8: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: EVALUATING DESIGN ALTERNATIVES AND CHOOSING A DESIGN
      1. 8.1 APPLYING METRICS TO OBJECTIVES: SELECTING THE PREFERRED DESIGN
      2. 8.2 EVALUATING DESIGNS FOR THE DANBURYARM SUPPORT
      3. 8.3 NOTES
  11. PART III: DESIGN COMMUNICATION
    1. CHAPTER 9: COMMUNICATING DESIGNS GRAPHICALLY
      1. 9.1 ENGINEERING SKETCHES AND DRAWINGS SPEAK TO MANY AUDIENCES
      2. 9.2 SKETCHING
      3. 9.3 FABRICATION SPECIFICATIONS: THE SEVERAL FORMS OF ENGINEERING DRAWINGS
      4. 9.4 FABRICATION SPECIFICATIONS: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS
      5. 9.5 FINAL NOTES ON DRAWINGS
      6. 9.6 NOTES
    2. CHAPTER 10: PROTOTYPING AND PROOFING THE DESIGN
      1. 10.1 PROTOTYPES, MODELS, AND PROOFS OF CONCEPT
      2. 10.2 BUILDING MODELS AND PROTOTYPES
      3. 10.3 NOTES
    3. CHAPTER 11: COMMUNICATING DESIGNS ORALLY AND IN WRITING
      1. 11.1 GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION
      2. 11.2 ORAL PRESENTATIONS: TELLING A CROWD WHAT'S BEEN DONE
      3. 11.3 THE PROJECT REPORT: WRITING FOR THE CLIENT, NOT FOR HISTORY
      4. 11.4 FINAL REPORT ELEMENTS FOR THE DANBURY ARM SUPPORT
      5. 11.5 NOTES
  12. PART IV: DESIGN MODELING, ENGINEERING ECONOMICS, AND DESIGN USE
    1. CHAPTER 12: MATHEMATICAL MODELING IN DESIGN
      1. 12.1 SOME MATHEMATICAL HABITS OF THOUGHT FOR DESIGN MODELING
      2. 12.2 SOME MATHEMATICAL TOOLS FOR DESIGN MODELING
      3. 12.3 MODELING A BATTERY-POWERED PAYLOAD CART
      4. 12.4 DESIGN MODELING OF A LADDER RUNG
      5. 12.5 PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A LADDER RUNG
      6. 12.6 CLOSING REMARKS ON MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS, AND DESIGN
      7. 12.7 NOTES
    2. CHAPTER 13: ENGINEERING ECONOMICS IN DESIGN
      1. 13.1 COST ESTIMATION: HOW MUCH DOES THIS PARTICULAR DESIGN COST?
      2. 13.2 THE TIME VALUE OF MONEY
      3. 13.3 CLOSING CONSIDERATIONS ON ENGINEERING AND ECONOMICS
      4. 13.4 NOTES
    3. CHAPTER 14: DESIGN FOR PRODUCTION, USE, AND SUSTAIN ABILITY
      1. 14.1 DESIGN FOR PRODUCTION: CAN THIS DESIGN BE MADE?
      2. 14.2 DESIGN FOR USE: HOW LONG WILL THIS DESIGN WORK?
      3. 14.3 DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: WHAT ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT?
      4. 14.4 NOTES
  13. PART V: DESIGN TEAMS, TEAM MANAGEMENT, AND ETHICS IN DESIGN
    1. CHAPTER 15: DESIGN TEAM DYNAMICS
      1. 15.1 FORMING DESIGN TEAMS
      2. 15.2 CONSTRUCTIVE CONFLICT: ENJOYING A GOOD FIGHT
      3. 15.3 LEADING DESIGN TEAMS
      4. 15.4 NOTES
    2. CHAPTER 16: MANAGING A DESIGN PROJECT
      1. 16.1 GETTING STARTED: ESTABLISHING THE MANAGERIAL NEEDS OF A PROJECT
      2. 16.2 TOOLS FOR MANAGING A PROJECT's SCOPE
      3. 16.3 THE TEAM CALENDAR: A TOOL FOR MANAGING A PROJECT's SCHEDULE
      4. 16.4 THE BUDGET: A TOOL FOR MANAGING A PROJECT's SPENDING
      5. 16.5 MONITORING AND CONTROLLING PROJECTS: MEASURING A PROJECT's PROGRESS
      6. 16.6 MANAGING THE END OF A PROJECT
      7. 16.7 NOTES
    3. CHAPTER 17: ETHICS IN DESIGN
      1. 17.1 ETHICS: UNDERSTANDING OBLIGATIONS
      2. 17.2 CODES OF ETHICS: WHAT ARE OUR PROFESSIONAL OBLIGATIONS?
      3. 17.3 OBLIGATIONS MAY START WITH THE CLIENT…
      4. 17.4 … BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PUBLIC AND THE PROFESSION?
      5. 17.5 ON ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND THE WELFARE OF THE PUBLIC
      6. 17.6 ETHICS: ALWAYS A PART OF ENGINEERING PRACTICE
      7. 17.7 NOTES
  14. APPENDIX A: PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF PROTOTYPING
    1. A.1 WORKING SAFELY IN A SHOP
    2. A.2 SELECTING MATERIALS
    3. A.3 BUILDING TECHNIQUES
    4. A.4 SELECTING A FASTENER
    5. A.5 NOTES
  15. APPENDIX B: PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF ENGINEERING DRAWING
    1. B.1 DIMENSIONING
    2. B.2 GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING
    3. B.3 HOW DO I KNOW MY PART MEETS THE SPECIFICATIONS IN MY DRAWING?
    4. B.4 NOTES
  16. APPENDIX C: EXERCISES
    1. C.1 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 1
    2. C.2 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 2
    3. C.3 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 3
    4. C.4 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 4
    5. C.5 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 5
    6. C.6 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 6
    7. C.7 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 7
    8. C.8 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 8
    9. C.9 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 9
    10. C.10 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 10
    11. C.11 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 11
    12. C.12 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 12
    13. C.13 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 13
    14. C.14 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 14
    15. C.15 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 15
    16. C.16 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 16
    17. C.17 EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 17
    18. C.18 EXERCISES FOR APPENDIX B
  17. REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
  18. INDEX