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End-to-End High Availability Solution for System z from a Linux Perspective

Book Description

As Linux on System z becomes more prevalent and mainstream in the industry, the need for it to deliver higher levels of availability is increasing.

This IBM Redbooks publication starts with an explanation of high availability (HA) fundamentals such as HA concepts and terminology. It continues with a discussion of why a business needs to consider an HA solution and then explains how to determine your business single points of failure.

We outline the components of a high availability solution and describe these components. Then we provide some architectural scenarios and demonstrate how to plan and decide an implementation of an end-to-end HA solution, from Linux on System z database scenarios to z/OS, and include storage, network, z/VM, Linux, and middleware.

This implementation includes the IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms (TSA MP), which monitors and automates applications distributed across Linux, AIX®, and z/OS® operating systems, as well as a GDPS based solution. It includes the planning for an end-to-end scenario, considering Linux on System z, z/VM, and z/OS operating environments, and the middleware used.

The TSA MP implements HA for infrastructure, network, operating systems, and applications across multiple platforms and is compared to a Linux HA implementation based on open source Linux-HA, which is Linux only.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. High availability fundamentals
    1. 1.1 High availability concepts
    2. 1.2 High availability terminology
      1. 1.2.1 Availability processes and targets
      2. 1.2.2 Outage and recovery terminology
      3. 1.2.3 HA architecture terminology
  5. Chapter 2. Business and IT availability
    1. 2.1 Business and IT resilience
      1. 2.1.1 Regulations
      2. 2.1.2 Business requirements
      3. 2.1.3 Other considerations
    2. 2.2 High availability inhibitors in IT practices
      1. 2.2.1 Phase 1: Planning for high availability
      2. 2.2.2 Phase 2: Development
      3. 2.2.3 Phase 3: Validation
      4. 2.2.4 Phase 4: Implementation and updating
    3. 2.3 Business impact of outages
      1. 2.3.1 Quantifying the cost of making services continuously available
      2. 2.3.2 Continuous availability versus high availability versus disaster recovery
      3. 2.3.3 Heterogeneous end-to-end view
      4. 2.3.4 Poor communication between business and IT
    4. 2.4 Determining single points of failure
    5. 2.5 High availability options
      1. 2.5.1 Active / active configuration
      2. 2.5.2 Active / passive configuration
      3. 2.5.3 Being realistic about the cost of continuous availability
    6. 2.6 Deciding on a high availability solution
  6. Chapter 3. Components of high availability
    1. 3.1 Components of a high availability solution
    2. 3.2 Hardware high availability
      1. 3.2.1 System z hardware
      2. 3.2.2 IBM DS8000 series
    3. 3.3 Storage high availability
      1. 3.3.1 Storage copy services
      2. 3.3.2 Site replication options
    4. 3.4 Operating system high availability
      1. 3.4.1 Operating system storage high availability features
      2. 3.4.2 z/VM high availability features
      3. 3.4.3 Linux high availability features
    5. 3.5 Software solutions for high availability
      1. 3.5.1 Linux with z/OS high availability solutions
    6. 3.6 Network high availability
      1. 3.6.1 External network infrastructure
      2. 3.6.2 Open Systems Adapter cards
      3. 3.6.3 z/VM Virtual Switch
      4. 3.6.4 HiperSockets
  7. Chapter 4. Architectural scenarios
    1. 4.1 Database high availability: Two sites
      1. 4.1.1 High availability clustering and automation tools
      2. 4.1.2 Database layer
    2. 4.2 z/OS database scenario
      1. 4.2.1 Parallel Sysplex technology
      2. 4.2.2 DB2 sysplex
      3. 4.2.3 GDPS Metro and z/OS Global Mirror (z/OS Metro/Global Mirror)
      4. 4.2.4 DB2 Q-replication for HA
    3. 4.3 z/OS and Linux scenarios
  8. Chapter 5. Practical applications
    1. 5.1 DB2 High Availability Disaster Recovery (HADR)
      1. 5.1.1 DB2 HADR setup
      2. 5.1.2 DB2 HADR prerequisites
      3. 5.1.3 Setting up the DB2 registry profile
      4. 5.1.4 Linux ports configuration
      5. 5.1.5 Database archive setup
      6. 5.1.6 Backup of the primary database
      7. 5.1.7 Setting up the DB2 database configuration
      8. 5.1.8 Starting HADR
      9. 5.1.9 DB2 HADR takeover verification
      10. 5.1.10 Why we used Tivoli System Automation
    2. 5.2 IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms
      1. 5.2.1 Prerequisites
      2. 5.2.2 Tivoli System Authomation manual installation
      3. 5.2.3 Preparing the node for communication
      4. 5.2.4 SA MP Cluster configuration
      5. 5.2.5 SA MP DB2 automated failover scenarios
  9. Chapter 6. Summary
    1. 6.1 The need for high availability
    2. 6.2 Applications that need to be highly available
    3. 6.3 High availability options available on System z
  10. Appendix A. Common TSA commands
    1. Common Tivoli system automation commands
  11. Appendix B. Hints and tips during cluster setup
    1. Domain nodes not communicating
    2. Node names
    3. Problems with db2haicu definition
    4. Unhealthy TSA cluster state
  12. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Other publications
    3. Help from IBM
  13. Back cover
  14. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  15. Notices
    1. Trademarks