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E-Logistics

Book Description

E-Logistics focusses on the strategic role of e-logistics in managing information and information flows within and between organisations in today's dynamic global environment.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Contents
  4. About the contributors
  5. PART ONE E-logistics development
    1. 01    E-logistics: an introduction
      1. Yingli Wang and Stephen Pettit
      2. Definition of e-logistics
      3. Historical development
      4. The way forward – an overview of the book’s structure
      5. References
    2. 02    Supporting ICT infrastructure for future logistics
      1. Adrian E Coronado Mondragon, Etienne S Coronado Mondragon and Christian E Coronado Mondragon
      2. ICT and logistics
      3. Intelligent transport systems
      4. Smart grid
      5. The convergence infrastructure for ITS and the smart grid
      6. Applications of a convergence infrastructure for ITS and the smart grid
      7. Conclusions and future work between ITS and the smart grid
      8. References
  6. PART TWO E-logistics for transport modes and nodes
    1. 03    ICT for airfreight management
      1. Robert Mayer
      2. Introduction
      3. Airfreight: the challenges
      4. The airfreight supply chain
      5. Customer interfaces
      6. Issues
      7. Summary and conclusions
      8. Notes
      9. References
    2. 04    ICT for rail freight management
      1. Allan Woodburn
      2. Introduction
      3. Basic principles of ICT in rail freight operations
      4. What do rail freight customers want?
      5. Tracking and tracing information for customers
      6. Other ICT applications that help rail freight to play to its strengths
      7. The role of ICT for rail freight in the single European railway area
      8. Summary
      9. References
    3. 05    ICT for efficient road freight transport
      1. Derek Beevor, with contributions from Ben Clewett
      2. Introduction
      3. Skylark
      4. Cloud computing
      5. Telematic data
      6. Data source
      7. IT system development
      8. Big data
      9. Conclusion: the need for greater collaboration?
      10. References
    4. 06    Electronic bills of lading
      1. Nikolaos Vasilakis and Rawindaran Nair
      2. Introduction
      3. Bills of lading – background
      4. Bill of lading as a receipt
      5. Bill of lading as evidence of contract of carriage
      6. Bill of lading as document of title
      7. Background legal framework
      8. UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Commerce
      9. Industry versions of electronic bills of lading
      10. Recent global initiatives on electronic commerce
      11. Conclusions
      12. Notes
      13. References
    5. 07    Port-centric ICT system
      1. Tsz Leung Yip, Yingli Wang, Jane Jing Haider and Marten van der Velde
      2. Introduction
      3. The importance of ICT to port systems: an academic background
      4. The port-centric ICT
      5. Information matrix of port-centric ICT
      6. ICT investment
      7. Port community systems
      8. Policy implications
      9. Conclusion
      10. References
  7. PART THREE Automating e-logistics
    1. 08    B2C e-commerce and fulfilment
      1. Sharon Cullinane
      2. Introduction
      3. Structural dimensions
      4. Market dimensions
      5. E-fulfilment dimensions
      6. Last-mile dimensions
      7. Environmental dimensions
      8. Upcoming trends
      9. Summary
      10. References
    2. 09    The challenges of e-commerce on warehousing in the future
      1. Gwynne Richards
      2. Introduction
      3. The challenges
      4. Type, size and location of fulfilment centres and warehouses
      5. Location of inventory
      6. Outsourcing
      7. Warehouse operations
      8. Technology and automation
      9. Conclusion
      10. References
    3. 10    Advanced warehouse management systems and innovations
      1. Tim Hotze
      2. Common warehouse functions and why warehouses are needed
      3. The evolution of information management in warehouses and distribution centres
      4. Core warehouse management system (WMS) features
      5. Connectivity of WMS solutions into ERP and information management systems
      6. Warehouse control systems and the integration of automation equipment
      7. RFID technology to enhance data capture processes in warehouse environments
      8. Labour management and workforce systems
      9. Summary
      10. References
    4. 11    RFID in logistics
      1. Hywel Williams
      2. Introduction
      3. Technologies in use
      4. Costs and benefits of RFID
      5. Potential applications
      6. RFID for returnable asset tracking
      7. RFID in grocery retailing
      8. RFID in fashion retailing
      9. Conclusion
      10. Summary
      11. References
    5. 12    The role of GS1 in logistics and e-procurement
      1. Hywel Williams
      2. Background
      3. History
      4. Using GS1 codes
      5. GS1 keys used in logistics and e-procurement
      6. GS1 barcodes
      7. Barcode formats
      8. GS1 EPCglobal
      9. Privacy concerns
      10. The global data synchronization network (GDSN)
      11. Electronic data interchange
      12. Electronic product code information system (EPCIS)
      13. GS1 and customs
      14. GS1 standards in health care
      15. Summary
      16. Notes
    6. 13    Automating a logistics service chain
      1. Gilbert Owusu, Sid Shakya, Okung Ntofon and Ali McCormick
      2. Introduction
      3. A framework for automating the service chain
      4. Implementing a service chain for field and service operations
      5. Delivering a networked ecosystem
      6. Conclusions and reflections
      7. References
  8. PART FOUR Regional and global e-logistics
    1. 14    Regional electronic marketplaces to improve logistics
      1. Yingli Wang and Andrew Potter
      2. Introduction
      3. Context for the research
      4. Electronic logistics marketplaces
      5. Perspectives of potential Welsh users
      6. Framework for implementing a regional ELM
      7. Conclusion
      8. References
    2. 15    Trade and transport electronic single windows
      1. Takis Katsoulakos, Yannis Zorgios and Zisis Palaskas
      2. Introduction
      3. Trade facilitation SWs
      4. Customs-related initiatives
      5. EU maritime transport single windows (MSWs)
      6. A design and development SW platform
      7. Glossary
      8. Notes
    3. 16    Single window systems for global supply chain management
      1. Jeong Hugh Han
      2. Overview
      3. Global supply chain management and single window systems
      4. Concluding remarks
      5. References
    4. 17    End-to-end global visibility and order management for integrated supply and demand chains
      1. Tim Hotze
      2. The evolution and need for supply chain management
      3. Value chain management and the importance of managing information
      4. Common interfaces between supply chain and demand chain stakeholders
      5. A three-tiered system of people, processes and systems
      6. Common types of purchase orders
      7. KPI reporting, interactive dashboards and management by exception
      8. Summary
      9. Glossary
  9. PART FIVE Future outlook
    1. 18    ICT in multimodal transport and technological trends
      1. Irina Harris, Yingli Wang and Haiyang Wang
      2. Introduction
      3. Multimodal transport
      4. ICT in multimodal transport
      5. Barriers related to ICT adoption
      6. Technological trends
      7. ‘Big data’ and decision support systems for managing multimodal transport
      8. Impact evaluation
      9. Conclusion
      10. Note
      11. References
  10. Appendix A: EU projects and technological trends
  11. Index
  12. Copyright