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E-Business Models, Services, and Communications

Book Description

"With the rapid advancement in information technologies, e-business is rapidly growing in significance and is having a direct impact upon business applications and technologies.

E-Business Models, Services and Communications provides researchers and practitioners with valuable information on recent advances and developments in emerging e-business models and technologies. This book covers a variety of topics such as e-business models, telecommunication network utilization, online consumer behavior, electronic communication adoption and service provider strategies, and privacy policies and implementation issues."

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Preface
  3. I. E-Business Models and Organizations
    1. I. Markets, Hierarchies, and the Evolving Nature of Interorganizational Cooperation1
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. EXCHANGE MECHANISMS AND INTERORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS
      4. THE IMPACT OF THE INTERNET ON INTERORGANIZATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
        1. Relational Integration and IS Integration
      5. A TYPOLOGY OF INTERORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS
        1. Brick-n-Mortar Hierarchies
        2. Click-n-Mortar Hierarchies
        3. Plug-n-Play Hierarchies
        4. Electronic Markets
      6. EXPLORATORY EVIDENCE FOR THE PROPOSED TYPOLOGY
        1. Samsung Electronics
        2. Hyundai-Kia Motors
        3. SK Telecom
        4. LG Mart
      7. DISCUSSION
        1. Brick-n-Mortar Hierarchies
        2. Click-n-Mortar Hierarchies
        3. Plug-n-Play Hierarchies
        4. Electronic Markets
      8. LIMITATIONS AND EXTENSIONS
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ENDNOTE
    2. II. Implementing E-Business Models in the Public Services: Challenges, Constraints, and Successful Elements
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. E-BUSINESS MODELS IN THE PUBLIC SERVICES: LIMITATIONS OF EXISTING FRAMEWORKS
      4. RESEARCH METHOD AND DESIGN
      5. EXAMINING E-BUSINESS STRATEGIES IN PRACTICE: THE CASE OF BRITAIN 'S NATIONAL MAPPING AGENCY
        1. Key Facts About NMA
        2. External Context
        3. Internal Context
        4. Drivers for Change
        5. The Change Agenda: From Bureaucracy to E-Business
      6. IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES
        1. Organisational Restructuring
        2. Ownership of the Strategy
        3. Risk Management, Change Control, and Financial Monitoring at Appropriate Levels
        4. Internal Communication
        5. … and Further Restructuring
      7. INFLUENCING FACTORS
        1. Adaptive Responses to Government Policy and the Political "Ties" of the Organisations
        2. Commercialisation Framework (Degree of Commercialisation)
        3. Complex Nature of Strategy
        4. Organisational Culture: The Public Sector "Ethos"
        5. Nature of the Workforce
        6. "Local Parochialism"
        7. Management of the E-Business Change Programme Itself
      8. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE CASE STUDY
      9. CONCLUSION
      10. REFERENCES
    3. III. Ambient E-Service: Applications and Embracing Model
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION TO AMBIENT E-SERVICE
        1. Value Stack
        2. Environment Stack
        3. Technology Stack
      3. AMBIENT E-SERVICE APPLICATIONS
        1. Ambient Shopping Mall Scenario
        2. Information Distribution Cooperation Scenario
        3. Ambient Location Information Acquisition Scenario
        4. Cooperative Peer Group Scenario
        5. Conceptual Scenario Infrastructure
      4. CHALLENGES FOR EMBRACING AMBIENT E-SERVICE
        1. Relationships Between Trust, Reputation, and Privacy
        2. Embracing Challenges
      5. CURRENT RESEARCH IN AMBIENT E-SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION
        1. Dynamic Identity Management for Ambient E-Service
        2. Ambient Data Management for Ambient E-Service
      6. AMBIENT E-SERVICE EMBRACING MODEL (ASEM)
        1. ASEM Measurement Design
      7. ROADMAP FOR AMBIENT E-SERVICES
        1. Application Service Domain
        2. Platform Design Domain
        3. Benefits of ASEM
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. REFERENCES
    4. IV. Superior Customer Value and Network Size in Markets Characterized by Network Effects
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Terms and Definitions
        2. Business Strategies
        3. Inefficiencies and Corrections
        4. Recent Studies
      4. MODELING CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE
        1. Total Customer Value
        2. Total Customer Cost
        3. Customer Perceived Value
        4. Summary of Notations
      5. DELIVERING SUPERIOR CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE
        1. Increasing Total Customer Value
        2. Reducing Total Customer Cost
      6. CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE AND NETWORK SIZE
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
      9. REFERENCES
  4. 2. E-Business Strategies
    1. v. Pure Play vs. Bricks-and-Clicks:A Study of Their Benefits and Practices
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BRICKS-AND-CLICKS VS. PURE PLAY
        1. The Assumed Advantages of Bricks-and-Clicks
        2. Challenges to Bricks-and-Clicks
        3. Practices
        4. Specific Research Questions
      4. METHODOLOGY
      5. Sample
      6. DATA ANALYSIS
        1. E-Commerce Benefits Validation
        2. Validation of Process Redesign, Benchmarking, and Planning Practices
        3. Common Method Variance
        4. Non-Response Bias
      7. ANSWERS TO RESEARCH QUESTIONS
        1. Question 1: Which Benefits Does Each Type of E-Commerce Realize?
        2. QUESTION 2: WHICH ELECTRONIC RETAILING TYPE ACHIEVES GREATER BENEFITS?
        3. Question 3: HOW do the Types Differ in Using the Practices to Obtain the Benefits?
        4. Question 4: Which Type is Better than the Other type at Applying the Practices to Realize the Benefits?
      8. DISCUSSION
        1. Question 1: Which Benefits does each Type of E-Commerce Realize?
        2. Question 2: Which Electronic Retailing Type Achieves Greater Benefits?
        3. Question 3: HOW do the Types Differ in Using the Practices to Obtain the Benefits?
        4. Question 4: Which Type is Better than the Other Type at Applying the Practices to Realize the Benefits?
      9. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCHERS
      10. IMPLICATIONS
      11. CONCLUSION
      12. REFERENCES
    2. VI. Engaging SMEs in E-Business: Insights from an Empirical Study
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. DEFINITIONS OF E-BUSINESS AND SME
      4. MODELS OF E-ADOPTION/GROWTH
        1. The "E-Adoption Ladder"
        2. The Staircase of Internet Engagement
      5. FACTORS IMPACTING E-BUSINESS ADOPTION IN SMES
        1. Resource-Based Issues
        2. Competency/Skills Gap
        3. Managerial Orientation and Attitudes
        4. Benefits Awareness
        5. Contextual Factors
      6. KEY FINDINGS FROM AN UK EMPIRICAL STUDY
        1. Research Method
        2. Company Profile and Use of the Technology
        3. Position in the Ladder—The Level of Adoption of E-Business Technology
        4. The Driving Forces of E-Business Adoption
          1. Business Benefits
          2. Industry Common Practice or Peer Pressure
          3. Awareness of E-Business Function
        5. The Barriers to E-Business Adoption
        6. Lack of Resources and Training
          1. The Industry Nature and Tradition
          2. Lack Of Push From Supply Chain (Customer Demand)
          3. Lack of Vision and Industrial Champion
        7. A Forward View of E-Adoption Pattern
      7. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS
      8. REFERENCE
    3. VII. China and India:E-Business in the Developing World
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND AND LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Economic Development
        2. Development of Technology
      4. CHINA'S APPROACH TO E-BUSINESS
        1. Regulatory Environment
        2. Infrastructure
        3. Policy
        4. Culture
        5. E-Business
      5. INDIA'S APPROACH TO E-BUSINESS
        1. Regulatory Environment
        2. Infrastructure
        3. Policy
        4. Culture
        5. E-Business
      6. DISCUSSION
      7. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION
      8. REFERENCES
    4. VIII. The Role of Trust in Business-to-Business E-Commerce Collaboration in a Unique Environment in Australia
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. DEFINING CONCEPTS
        1. Interorganisational Relationships
        2. Trust
      4. RESEARCH QUESTIONS
      5. BACKGROUND LITERATURE
      6. METHOD
      7. SAMPLE
        1. Organisation A: Government
        2. Organisation B: Wholesale
        3. Organisation C: Information Services
        4. Organisation D: Manufacturing
      8. FINDINGS
        1. Locus of Trust
        2. Facilitators of Trust
          1. Interpersonal Trust
          2. System Trust
        3. Inhibitors of Trust
        4. Does Environment Matter?
      9. DISCUSSION
      10. IMPLICATIONS AND LIMITATIONS
      11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      12. REFERENCES
      13. ENDNOTE
  5. 3. Web Services
    1. IX. Incorporating Web Services into E-Business Systems: An SME Perspective
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SMES AND E-BUSINESS
        1. Characteristics of SMEs
        2. IT Adoption in SMEs
        3. Factors Influencing the Adoption and Non-Adoption of E-Business in SMEs
        4. State of E-Business Adoption in SMEs
      4. WEB SERVICES DEPLOYMENT BARRIERS
        1. Stakeholders of Web Services
        2. Stakeholder Challenges
          1. Providers
          2. Consumers
          3. Standards Organizations
        3. Web Services Incorporation Challenges Framework
      5. WEB SERVICES INCORPORATION CHALLENGES FOR SMEs
        1. SMEs as Web Services Consumer
          1. Technical Challenges
            1. Search and Identification of Relevant WS
            2. Customization and Integration
            3. Metrics and Security
            4. Dynamic and Trusted Environment
            5. Tools and Infrastructure
          2. Managerial Challenges
            1. Web Services Utilization Strategy
            2. Promoting Web Services Training and Education
            3. Resource Allocation and Support
            4. Incentives and Rewards
        2. SMEs as Web Services Supplier
          1. Technical Challenges
            1. Service Description and Profile
            2. Web Services Accessibility and Documentation
            3. Architecture Standards and Infrastructure
            4. Design Requirements
            5. Web Services Evolution
          2. Managerial Challenges
            1. Pricing and Quality of Service
            2. Identifying New Services
            3. Customer Support and Feedback
            4. Demand Management
      6. CONCLUDING REMARKS
      7. REFERENCES
    2. X. Modelling in Clinical Practice with Web Services and BPEL
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. PROCESS MODELLING
        1. Workflow Modelling and SOA
        2. Workflow in Health Care
        3. Business Process Execution Language
      4. APPLICATION: WORKFLOW FOR ASTHMA
      5. DEVELOPMENT OF WEB SERVICES
        1. Logical Level Interoperability
        2. Implementation Level Interoperability
          1. Practical Implementation Issues
          2. "Wrapped" Encoding
          3. External Service Description
          4. Transaction-Based Processes
      6. CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ENDNOTE
    3. XI. Assessing the Potential Impact of Web Services on Business Processes
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. RESEARCH APPROACH
      4. IDENTIFYING SUITABLE PROCESSES FOR WEB SERVICE DEPLOYMENT
        1. Decision Methodology: Overview
        2. First Phase: Process Rejection Based on Disqualifying Criteria
        3. Second Phase: Assessing General Web Services Suitability
        4. Third Phase: Organisational Characteristics
        5. Fourth Phase—Assigning Web Services Implementation Priority
      5. IDENTIFYING WEB SERVICE REQUIREMENTS FROM PROCESS MODELS
        1. Information for the Assessment of Web Service Potential
        2. Information for Facilitating Web Services Deployment
      6. INTEGRATION IN ARIS AND EXAMPLE
        1. Introduction to ARIS
        2. ARIS Model Types Employed
        3. Description of Relevant Modelling Constructs in ARIS
          1. Hierarchical Decomposition
          2. Attributes
          3. Organisational Objects
          4. Application System Objects
          5. Data Objects
          6. Information Carrier Objects
          7. Objective Objects
          8. Knowledge Objects
        4. Matching Web Service Information with ARIS Constructs
        5. E-Procurement Scenario
      7. RELATED WORK
      8. CONCLUSION
      9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      10. REFERENCES
    4. XII. Web Service Orchestration and Choreography: Enabling Business Processes on the Web
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. USING THE RIGHT TERMINOLOGY
      4. THE NEED FOR COORDINATION PROTOCOLS
        1. Conversation Between Service and Client
        2. Multi-Service Conversations
        3. Advanced Protocols and Specifications
        4. Coordination Middleware
      5. FROM COORDINATION TO COMPOSITION
        1. Model-Based Composition
          1. State Charts and Petri Nets
          2. Pi-Calculus
          3. Rule-Based Orchestration
          4. Two Representatives of Structured Process Models: BPEL(4WS) vs. BPML
        2. Semantics-Based Composition
          1. Two Emerging Standards: OWL-S vs. WSMO
        3. Quality of Service-Based Approaches
        4. Other Composition Approaches
      6. A POSSIBLE PROTOCOL STACK
        1. Coordination-Based Approaches
        2. Execution-Based Approaches
        3. Semantics-Based Approaches
        4. Quality of Service-Based Approaches
      7. ADVANCED COMPOSITION PROBLEMS
        1. Service Selection
        2. Message Correlation
        3. Transactions and Exception Handling
      8. HOW ORCHESTRATION DEPENDS ON CHOREOGRAPHY
        1. Structural Dependencies
        2. Functional Dependencies
        3. Resource Dependencies
      9. FUTURE TRENDS
        1. Coordination or Composition?
        2. Trends in Private Process Descriptions
        3. Trends in Public Process Description
        4. Open or Closed Worlds?
        5. From Web Services to Grid Services
      10. CONCLUDING REMARKS
      11. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      12. REFERENCES
      13. ENDNOTE
    5. XIII. Metering and Accounting for Service-Oriented Computing
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BASIC CONCEPTS AND TERMINOLOGY
        1. Monitoring, Metering, and Accounting
          1. Typical Accounting Infrastructure
          2. Usage Metrics
          3. Pricing, Charging, and Business Models
        2. Service-Oriented Architectures
          1. Atomic Services
          2. Composite Services
      4. METERING AND ACCOUNTING FOR SERVICES
        1. Metering for Atomic Services
          1. Resource Usage Metering
          2. Resource Usage Correlation
        2. Metering for Composite Services
          1. Usage Reporting Protocol
        3. Service Usage Correlation
        4. Usage Accounting
      5. SYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION
        1. Design
        2. The Composite Service Example
        3. Implementation
      6. DISCUSSION
      7. RELATED WORK
      8. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK
      9. NOTE
      10. REFERENCES
      11. ENDNOTES
  6. 4. Online Consumer Behavior
    1. XIV. Effects of Web-Based Customer Relationship Management on Customer Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
        1. Customer Relationship Management
        2. Market Orientation
        3. Internet-Mediated Market Orientation
        4. Online User/Customer Satisfaction
      4. RESEARCH DESIGN
        1. Research Constructs and Hypotheses
        2. Data Collection and Data Analysis
        3. Reliability and Validity of Variable Measurements
      5. MODEL VALIDATION
      6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
      7. REFERENCES
    2. XV. The Formation of Online Trust
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS
        1. Conceptualizing Trust
        2. Determinants of Trust
          1. Relational Belief
          2. Calculative Belief
          3. Institutional Belief
        3. Temporal Effects on Trust
      4. RESEARCH METHODS
        1. Empirical Setting
        2. Instrument Construction
      5. DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS
        1. Instrument Validation
        2. Hypotheses Testing
      6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION
        1. Key Findings and Implications
        2. Limitations of the Study
      7. REFERENCES
      8. ENDNOTES
    3. XVI. The Influence of Familiarity and Security on Decision Making Processes in E-Commerce: The Role of User Experience
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
      4. METHODOLOGY
      5. FUZZY EXPERT SYSTEM: COMPLETE MODEL
      6. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS
      7. FORMULATING SURVEY SITE
      8. PROCESSING OF DATA
        1. Calculation of Security and Familiarity level
      9. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING TRUST
        1. Trust vs. Security
        2. Trust vs. Familiarity
        3. Trust as Function of Security and Familiarity
      10. CONCLUSION
      11. REFERENCES
  7. 5. Online Intermediaries
    1. XVII. The Roles of Online Intermediaries in Collective Memory-Supported Electronic Negotiation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. NEGOTIATION, ELECTRONIC NEGOTIATION (E-NEGOTIATION), AND NEGOTIATION SUPPORT SYSTEMS (NSS)
        1. Negotiation
        2. Intermediary in Electronic Commerce
        3. Electronic Negotiation (E-Negotiation) and Negotiation Support Systems (NSS)
        4. Performance and Limitations of NSS and E-Negotiation
        5. Information and Knowledge Sharing in Negotiation
        6. Architecture of Knowledge Shared E-Negotiation
      4. RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND PROPOSITIONS
        1. Confidence in Negotiation Outcome
        2. Negotiation Time
        3. Trust
      5. CONCLUSION
      6. REFERENCES
    2. XVIII. Morethailand.com: Online Travel Intermediary
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION FOR TRAVEL AND TOURISM MARKETING: A THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE
      4. TOURISM INDUSTRY IN THAILAND
      5. THE TRAVEL INTERMEDIARY SECTOR IN THAILAND
      6. THE ONLINE TRAVEL AND TOURISM CHANNEL
      7. THE HOTEL INDUSTRY IN THAILAND
      8. CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENTS WITH HOTELS
      9. MORETHAILAND.COM VISITOR STATISTICS
      10. THE CUSTOMER PROFILE
      11. ONLINE MARKETING EFFORT OF THE MORETHAILAND.COM
      12. COMPARISON BETWEEN DESTINATION-AND NATIONALITY-BASED CAMPAIGNS THROUGH GOOGLE.COM
      13. OFF-LINE MARKETING
      14. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
      15. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION
      16. REFERENCES
  8. Compilation of References
  9. About the Contributors