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Drupal®: The Guide to Planning and Building Websites by Cindy McCourt

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A WEBSITE'S LIFECYCLE

All websites have a lifecycle. Someone gets an idea and builds a site, the site is used, and the site goes away or becomes something different. This is probably obvious to you, so why bring it up?

The lifecycle of a site is a convenient way to illustrate the work that needs to be planned and performed. It addresses not only the site production but also what happens after the site is launched. If you know the path ahead, it is easier to anticipate and plan.

Figure 1-2 shows a simplified step-by-step process that represents what a site's lifecycle might be. The chapters in this book reflect this one-step-at-a-time approach because books are linear and, if this is your first exposure to the work performed to plan, build, and sustain a site, it is easier to experience it one step at a time.

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FIGURE 1-2

However, the work performed during production is seldom performed in this exact order. Figure 1-2 illustrates one extreme, whereas Figure 1-3 illustrates another. Figure 1-3 shows that production can be an iterative process — moving from requirements to design to development and back to requirements until all decisions have been made and all development has been completed. At the heart of the production process is the need for the site. Without that focus, your project scope can expand beyond its original intent.

FIGURE 1-3

In reality, the production steps of a site ...

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