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Distributed Learning

Book Description

The field of distributed learning is constantly evolving. Online technology provides instructors with the flexibility to offer meaningful instruction to students who are at a distance or in some cases right on campus, but still unable to be physically present in the classroom. This dynamic environment challenges librarians to monitor, learn, adapt, collaborate, and use new technological advances in order to make the best use of techniques to engage students and improve learning outcomes and success rates. Distributed Learning provides evidence based information on a variety of issues, surrounding online teaching and learning from the perspective of librarians.

  • Includes extensive literature search on distributed learning
  • Provides pedagogy, developing content, and technology by librarians
  • Shows the importance of collaboration and buy-in from all parties involved

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. List of Contributors
  6. Biography
  7. Foreword
  8. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. References
  9. Section I: Foundations of Distributed Learning
    1. Chapter 2. Literature Review of Online Learning in Academic Libraries
      1. Abstract
      2. 2.1 Introduction
      3. 2.2 Background
      4. 2.3 Methodology
      5. 2.4 Subject Distribution
      6. 2.5 Technology
      7. 2.6 Creation Technology
      8. 2.7 Access Technology
      9. 2.8 Learning Environments
      10. 2.9 Challenges With Online Instruction
      11. 2.10 Best Practices
      12. 2.11 Assessment
      13. 2.12 Methods of Delivery
      14. 2.13 Collaboration With Faculty and Other Stakeholders
      15. 2.14 Learning Outcomes
      16. 2.15 Limitations
      17. 2.16 Conclusion
      18. References
    2. Chapter 3. Using Theory and Practice to Build an Instructional Technology Tool Kit
      1. Abstract
      2. 3.1 Introduction
      3. 3.2 Theory: A Review of the Literature
      4. 3.3 The Scholarship of Active Learning
      5. 3.4 The Scholarship of Effective Instructional Technology Use
      6. 3.5 Desired Learning Outcomes: An Important Consideration
      7. 3.6 Practice: Meaningfully Integrating Technology Tools in Information Literacy Instruction
      8. 3.7 Remembering Information
      9. 3.8 Understanding Information
      10. 3.9 Applying Information
      11. 3.10 Analyzing Information
      12. 3.11 Evaluating Information
      13. 3.12 Creating Information
      14. 3.13 Next Steps and Conclusions
      15. Appendix Technology Resources, Organized as Referenced in the Chapter
      16. References
  10. Section II: Pedagogy
    1. Chapter 4. Designing Online Asynchronous Information Literacy Instruction Using the ADDIE Model
      1. Abstract
      2. 4.1 Background
      3. 4.2 Instructional Design Models
      4. 4.3 Dick and Carey
      5. 4.4 Recursive Reflective Design and Development Model
      6. 4.5 Four-Component Instructional Design
      7. 4.6 Kemp
      8. 4.7 Gagné
      9. 4.8 ADDIE
      10. 4.9 Implementation Using the ADDIE Model
      11. 4.10 Design
      12. 4.11 Development
      13. 4.12 Implementation
      14. 4.13 Evaluation
      15. 4.14 Conclusion
      16. References
      17. Appendix 1 FYC Rubric
      18. Appendix 2 FYC Pretest Survey Summary
    2. Chapter 5. Enhancing Kuhlthau’s Guided Inquiry Model Using Moodle and LibGuides to Strengthen Graduate Students’ Research Skills
      1. Abstract
      2. 5.1 Introduction
      3. 5.2 Redesign Rationale
      4. 5.3 Curriculum Development for Distributed Learning Environment
      5. 5.4 Kuhlthau’s Guided Inquiry Program for Information Literacy
      6. 5.5 Online Zones of Intervention
      7. 5.6 Technology
      8. 5.7 LibGuides
      9. 5.8 Information Literacy Sessions Overview
      10. 5.9 Session One: Topic Selection
      11. 5.10 Session Two: Website Evaluation and Scholarly Sources
      12. 5.11 Session Three: Database Searching
      13. 5.12 Assessment Measures
      14. 5.13 Moodle and LibGuide Analytics
      15. 5.14 Conclusion
      16. References
    3. Chapter 6. A Model for Teaching Information Literacy in a Required Credit-Bearing Online Course
      1. Abstract
      2. 6.1 Introduction
      3. 6.2 Measure of INL102’s Success
      4. 6.3 Integrating Technology
      5. 6.4 Library Staff and Collection as a Resource
      6. 6.5 Assessments
      7. 6.6 Schedule for Updates
      8. 6.7 Conclusion
      9. References
    4. Chapter 7. Engaging Learners Online: Using Instructional Design Practices to Create Interactive Tutorials
      1. Abstract
      2. 7.1 Introduction
      3. 7.2 Design
      4. 7.3 Assessment and Evaluation
      5. 7.4 Selecting Technology
      6. 7.5 Conclusion
      7. References
      8. Appendix 1 Clark’s Content Performance Matrix for Microbiology Tutorial
    5. Chapter 8. Developing Best Practices for Creating an Authentic Learning Experience in an Online Learning Environment: Lessons Learned
      1. Abstract
      2. 8.1 Introduction
      3. 8.2 Sage, Guide, Meddler
      4. 8.3 Befriend the Gatekeepers
      5. 8.4 Possible Approaches
      6. 8.5 Teaching in the Trenches
      7. 8.6 One Goal, Many Tools
      8. 8.7 Maintain Authority
      9. 8.8 Assessment
      10. 8.9 Future Work: Online Information Literacy Lab
      11. 8.10 Conclusion
      12. References
  11. Section III: Technology
    1. Chapter 9. Delivering Synchronous Online Library Instruction at a Large-Scale Academic Institution: Practical Tips and Lessons Learned
      1. Abstract
      2. 9.1 Introduction
      3. 9.2 Background
      4. 9.3 Literature Review
      5. 9.4 The Pilot
      6. 9.5 Evaluating the Pilot
      7. 9.6 Outcomes
      8. 9.7 Checklist for Delivering Synchronous ILI
      9. 9.8 Discussion
      10. 9.9 Were There Technological Barriers to Student Attendance?
      11. 9.10 Was the Timing Appropriate?
      12. 9.11 Is Synchronous Online Delivery Right for the Target Audience?
      13. 9.12 Conclusion
      14. References
    2. Chapter 10. Making Library Research Real in the Digital Classroom: A Professor–Librarian Partnership
      1. Abstract
      2. 10.1 Introduction
      3. 10.2 Filling the Information Literacy Gap in Online Courses
      4. 10.3 English 201 Courses at the Borough of Manhattan Community College
      5. 10.4 Partnering to Design Online Research Instruction
      6. 10.5 Implementing a Scaffolded Model of Research Instruction
      7. 10.6 Start Small and Build Over Time
      8. 10.7 A Diverse Range of Activities
      9. 10.8 Revision
      10. 10.9 Accessibility
      11. 10.10 Assessment
      12. 10.11 Library Day Test
      13. 10.12 Workload and Sustainability
      14. 10.13 Reflections on the Method and the Partnership
      15. References
      16. Appendix A Librarian’s Activities in the Course Modules
      17. Appendix B Survey Questions
    3. Chapter 11. Forging Connections in Digital Spaces: Teaching Information Literacy Skills Through Engaging Online Activities
      1. Abstract
      2. 11.1 Introduction and Literature Review
      3. 11.2 Assignments and Learning Activities
      4. 11.3 Discussion
      5. 11.4 Conclusion
      6. References
    4. Chapter 12. Innovation Through Collaboration: Using an Open-Source Learning Management System to Enhance Library Instruction and Student Learning
      1. Abstract
      2. 12.1 Introduction
      3. 12.2 Customized User Roles in Moodle
      4. 12.3 Looking Ahead
      5. References
      6. Appendix 1 Senior Projects Information Literacy Skills Assessment Rubric-Purchase College Library
    5. Chapter 13. From Technical Troubleshooting to Critical Inquiry: Fostering Inquiry-Based Learning Across Disciplines Through a Tutorial for Online Instructors
      1. Abstract
      2. 13.1 Introduction
      3. 13.2 Institutional Context
      4. 13.3 Technology
      5. 13.4 Collaboration
      6. 13.5 The Pilot Series
      7. 13.6 Conclusion
      8. References
      9. Appendix A Online Course Development: Library Resources Checklist
      10. Appendix B Teaching Online Series: Library Module Table of Contents
      11. Appendix C Communicating Assessment Criteria to Students: Rubrics
    6. Chapter 14. Embedding the Library in the LMS: Is It a Good Investment for Your Organization’s Information Literacy Program?
      1. Abstract
      2. 14.1 Introduction
      3. 14.2 Literature Review
      4. 14.3 History and Development of the Library Tools Tab at UAL
      5. 14.4 Analysis: How Is the Value of the Embedded System Measured?
      6. 14.5 How Does UAL Course Guide Use Compare with LTT Use?
      7. 14.6 Conclusion
      8. 14.7 Future Development
      9. References
    7. Chapter 15. A Decade of Distributed Library Learning: The NOSM Health Sciences Library Experience
      1. Abstract
      2. 15.1 The NOSM Context
      3. 15.2 The Health Sciences Library
      4. 15.3 Videoconferencing
      5. 15.4 Videoconferencing and Participant Engagement
      6. 15.5 Technological Challenges of Videoconferencing
      7. 15.6 LibGuides, Padlet, and Powtoon
      8. 15.7 Conclusion
      9. References
    8. Chapter 16. Parallel Lines: A Look at Some Common Issues in the Development, Repurposing, and Use of Online Information Literacy Training Resources at Glasgow Caledonian University
      1. Abstract
      2. 16.1 Introduction
      3. 16.2 Market Scan
      4. 16.3 Planning: Storyboarding, Design, and Project Management
      5. 16.4 Pedagogical Issues, IL Frameworks
      6. 16.5 Development Software (HTML, Flash, and Gamification)
      7. 16.6 Compatibility with Mobile Devices
      8. 16.7 Hardware and Methods of Delivery
      9. 16.8 Testing and Pilot Phases
      10. 16.9 Teaching: The Best Way to Use Online Resources
      11. 16.10 Futureproofing
      12. 16.11 Areas for Further Research
      13. References
      14. Appendix
  12. Section IV: Case Studies
    1. Chapter 17. Concept to Reality: Integrating Online Library Instruction Into a University English Curriculum
      1. Abstract
      2. 17.1 Introduction and Background
      3. 17.2 Partnering to Enable Library Literacy for First-Year English Literature Students
      4. 17.3 The Initial Development of Program Content, Technology, and Evaluative Formula
      5. 17.4 The Pilot of the Program and the Evolution of Content, Style, and Delivery
      6. 17.5 The Route to Success: Collaboration, Evaluation, and the Importance of Partnership
      7. 17.6 Considering the Future While Remaining Connected to the Wider Educational Community
      8. References
    2. Chapter 18. A Successful Reboot: Reimagining an Online Information Literacy Tutorial for a First-Year Experience Program
      1. Abstract
      2. 18.1 Introduction
      3. 18.2 Setting the Scene: Literature Review
      4. 18.3 The Pitch: Establishing the Goals of the Project
      5. 18.4 Casting Call: The Pilot Participants
      6. 18.5 Action!: The Video Production
      7. 18.6 On Set: The Flipped (Library) Classroom
      8. 18.7 Test Screening: Focus Groups
      9. 18.8 Project Distribution: Making the Most of the LMS
      10. 18.9 The Reviews Are In: Assessing the Student Quiz Results and Instructor Feedback
      11. 18.10 Director Commentary: Discussion
      12. 18.11 That’s a Wrap! Conclusion
      13. References
    3. Chapter 19. Rethinking Plagiarism in Information Literacy Instruction: A Case Study on Cross-Campus Collaboration in the Creation of an Online Academic Honesty Video Tutorial
      1. Abstract
      2. 19.1 Introduction
      3. 19.2 Background: Discovering the Need for a Plagiarism Tutorial
      4. 19.3 Literature Review: Who’s Creating Library Videos?
      5. 19.4 Method: Producing a Useful and Informative Video
      6. 19.5 Lessons Learned: Looking Back and Moving Forward
      7. 19.6 Assessment: Measuring Improvements
      8. 19.7 Conclusion: All Good Things…
      9. References
    4. Chapter 20. Adapting to the Evolving Information Landscape: A Case Study
      1. Abstract
      2. 20.1 The Evolution of an Information Literacy Course: A Case Study
      3. 20.2 Information Literacy Course History
      4. 20.3 A Question of Format
      5. 20.4 Perception Becomes Reality
      6. 20.5 A Question of Content
      7. 20.6 The Evolving Landscape
      8. 20.7 New Ways of Thinking
      9. 20.8 Information Literacy and Visual Thinking Strategies
      10. 20.9 Assessment
      11. 20.10 Assessment Analysis
      12. 20.11 The Evolution Continues
      13. 20.12 Conclusion
      14. Appendix A
      15. Appendix B
      16. Scoring Guide
      17. References
  13. Section V: Innovations
    1. Chapter 21. Gaming Library Instruction: Using Interactive Play to Promote Research as a Process
      1. Abstract
      2. 21.1 Introduction
      3. 21.2 Gamification and Interactivity
      4. 21.3 Creation of the Tutorial at GHL
      5. 21.4 Text-Based
      6. 21.5 Video Based
      7. 21.6 Feedback and Continued Game Development
      8. 21.7 Conclusion
      9. References
    2. Chapter 22. Implementing Flipped Classroom Model Utilizing Online Learning Guides in an Academic Hospital Library Setting
      1. Abstract
      2. 22.1 Introduction
      3. 22.2 History of the Flipped Classroom
      4. 22.3 Background
      5. 22.4 Methodology
      6. 22.5 Evaluation
      7. 22.6 Conclusion
      8. References
      9. Appendix A Instructor Reflections
      10. Appendix B Learner Evaluation Form
  14. Index