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Disaster Planning for Libraries

Book Description

Libraries are constantly at risk. Every day, many libraries and their collections are damaged by fire, flooding, high winds, power outages, and criminal behaviour. Every library needs a plan to protect its staff, sites and collections, including yours.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Dedication
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Preface
  8. A note on terminology
  9. How to use this book
  10. About the author
  11. 1: Libraries and risk
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1. The prevalence of risk
    3. 1.2. Natural risks
    4. 1.3. Technological risks
    5. 1.4. Human-caused risks
    6. 1.5. Proximity risks
    7. 1.6. Security risks
    8. 1.7. Enterprise risks
    9. 1.8. References
  12. 2: Preparedness
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1. Authorization
    3. 2.2. Committees: pros and cons
    4. 2.3. RAA, step one: history-taking
    5. 2.4. RAA, step two: inspection
    6. 2.5. RAA, step three: interviews
    7. 2.6. RAA, step four: discussions with external experts
    8. 2.7. RAA, step five: documentation
    9. 2.8. Mitigation: preventative maintenance programmes
    10. 2.9. Mitigation: gradual replacement of older facilities
    11. 2.10. Mitigation: insurance
    12. 2.11. Mitigation: data back-up
    13. 2.12. Mitigation: the key
    14. 2.13. References
  13. 3: Disaster response
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1. Staff and patron safety
    3. 3.2. Producing a disaster response plan
    4. 3.3. Production mistakes
    5. 3.4. The issue of library assets
    6. 3.5. Emotional reactions to emergencies and disasters
    7. 3.6. Leadership in response planning
    8. 3.7. Response teams
    9. 3.8. References
  14. 4: Operational resumption, continuity and recovery
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1. After the fact
    3. 4.2. Resumption
    4. 4.3. Continuity
    5. 4.4. Recovery
    6. 4.5. Management roles
    7. 4.6. Operational resumption teams
    8. 4.7. Perfection not possible
    9. 4.8. References
  15. 5: Damage assessment
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1. The effects
    3. 5.2. Internal and external inspectors
    4. 5.3. Beginning at the perimeter
    5. 5.4. Building exteriors
    6. 5.5. Safe entrance and exit
    7. 5.6. Building interiors
    8. 5.7. Inspecting damaged collections
    9. 5.8. Evaluation
    10. 5.9. Prioritization
    11. 5.10. Recordkeeping
    12. 5.11. References
  16. 6: Disaster recognition, declaration procedures and crisis management
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1. How it feels
    3. 6.2. Recognizing a disaster
    4. 6.3. Information gathering
    5. 6.4. When and when not to declare a disaster
    6. 6.5. Disasters and crises
    7. 6.6. The library crisis manager
    8. 6.7. References
  17. 7: Strategic alliances
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1. Determining the need for a strategic alliance
    3. 7.2. Key post-disaster vendors for resumption and continuity
    4. 7.3. Strategic alliance documentation
    5. 7.4. Updating strategic alliances
    6. 7.5. Adaptation of central library strategic alliances for branches
    7. 7.6. Going it alone?
    8. 7.7. References
  18. 8: Post-disaster management of patrons
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1. Convergence
    3. 8.2. Closure of facilities: process and implications
    4. 8.3. Reassuring patrons
    5. 8.4. Updating patrons on operational resumption and recovery
    6. 8.5. Dealing with volunteers
    7. 8.6. Post-disaster programmes
    8. 8.7. Message centres and missing children
    9. 8.8. References
  19. 9: Normalization of operations
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1. Reassuring employees
    3. 9.2. Normalization defined
    4. 9.3. Problems arising from incomplete normalization
    5. 9.4. Normalization checklists
    6. 9.5. Testing normalization programmes
    7. 9.6. References
  20. 10: Orientation and training programmes
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1. Binder dependence
    3. 10.2. Definitions: orientation and training
    4. 10.3. Purposes of orientation and training
    5. 10.4. Assumptions
    6. 10.5. Methods of delivery
    7. 10.6. Home circulars
    8. 10.7. Newsletter/Intranet materials
    9. 10.8. Staff orientation sessions
    10. 10.9. Management orientation sessions
    11. 10.10. Operational resumption and continuity orientation and training
    12. 10.11. Management security seminars
    13. 10.12. Training the trainers
    14. 10.13. Session reporting
    15. 10.14. References
  21. 11: Basic tabletop exercises
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1. No plan without practice
    3. 11.2. Risk assessment and analysis example
    4. 11.3. Generic tabletop exercises
    5. 11.4. Tabletops for managers
    6. 11.5. Pandemic influenza exercise
    7. 11.6. Tabletop exercise management tips
    8. 11.7. Conclusion
    9. 11.8. References
  22. 12: Process and results
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1. The overwhelming question
    3. 12.2. A case history: in the beginning
    4. 12.3. The process: preparedness
    5. 12.4. The process: response
    6. 12.5. The process: resumption
    7. 12.6. The process: backtracking
    8. 12.7. The process: orientation, training and testing
    9. 12.8. A real scenario
    10. 12.9. Use of the disaster plan
    11. 12.10. Post-resumption
    12. 12.11. References
  23. Further reading
  24. Appendix One: Lancaster Gate Public Library Crisis Management Plan
  25. Appendix Two: Pandemic Management Program
  26. Appendix Three: Main Library and Branch Post-Disaster Security Plan
  27. Appendix Four: Lancaster Gate Public Library
  28. Appendix Five: Main Library and Branch Post-Disaster Staff Allocation Plan
  29. Appendix Six: Information Technology Disaster Recovery Plan
  30. Index