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Digital Sound Processing for Music and Multimedia

Book Description

Provides an introduction to the nature, synthesis and transformation of sound which forms the basis of digital sound processing for music and multimedia. Background information in computer techniques is included so that you can write computer algorithms to realise new processes central to your own musical and sound processing ideas. Finally, material is inlcuded to explain the way in which people contribute to the development of new kinds of performance and composition systems.

Key features of the book include:
· Contents structured into free-standing parts for easy navigation
· `Flow lines' to suggest alternative paths through the book, depending on the primary interest of the reader.
· Practical examples are contained on a supporting website.

Digital Sound Processing can be used by anyone, whether from an audio engineering, musical or music technology perspective.

Digital sound processing in its various spheres - music technology, studio systems and multimedia - are witnessing the dawning of a new age. The opportunities for involvement in the expansion and development of sound transformation, musical performance and composition are unprecedented.

The supporting website (www.york.ac.uk/inst/mustech/dspmm.htm) contains working examples of computer techniques, music synthesis and sound processing.


Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Series introduction
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. Introduction and background
  9. Part 1 Context
    1. 1 Sound generation and recording in the twentieth century
      1. 1.1 Setting the context
      2. 1.2 The effect of technology on sound production
      3. 1.3 Musical changes from 1900–1950
      4. 1.4 Early systems for electronic sound generation
      5. 1.5 Development of recording technology
      6. 1.6 Electronic music studios
      7. 1.7 Live electronic music
      8. 1.8 Synthesisers
      9. 1.9 Digital sound
      10. 1.10 The performance interface
      11. 1.11 Digital computers with performance interfaces
      12. 1.12 The digital revolution
      13. 1.13 Performance instruments in the MIDI age
      14. 1.14 The microcomputer
      15. 1.15 Systems for capturing performance gesture
      16. 1.16 Interactive music environments
      17. 1.17 Summary
  10. Part 2 Sounds and signals
    1. 2 Sound and signals in music technology and digital audio
      1. 2.1 The electrical analogue of acoustic signals
      2. 2.2 The nature and content of signals
      3. 2.3 The effect of linearity and gain on the transmission of signals
      4. 2.4 The effect of frequency response on the transmission of signals
      5. 2.5 Summary
    2. 3 Digital audio
      1. 3.1 Preparation: frequency translation
      2. 3.2 The sampling process
      3. 3.3 Pulse code modulation (PCM) systems
      4. 3.4 Characteristics of digital audio systems
      5. 3.5 Synthetic audio systems
      6. 3.6 Summary
  11. Part 3 Music technology systems
    1. 4 MIDI: connecting instruments together
      1. 4.1 Musical background
      2. 4.2 The environment from which MIDI emerged
      3. 4.3 The development of MIDI
      4. 4.4 Designing instrument connections
      5. 4.5 The MIDI specification — hardware
      6. 4.6 The MIDI specification — messages
      7. 4.7 Format and construction of MIDI messages
      8. 4.8 Extensions to the original MIDI specification
      9. 4.9 Limitations of MIDI
      10. 4.10 The future of instrumental connections
      11. 4.11 Summary
    2. 5 The structure of common music technology systems
      1. 5.1 Types of electronic music equipment
      2. 5.2 Methods of digital sound generation
      3. 5.3 Methods of digital sound processing
      4. 5.4 Digital sound generation techniques
      5. 5.5 Digital sound processing techniques
      6. 5.6 Summary
  12. Part 4 Computer fundamentals
    1. 6 An introduction to digital logic
      1. 6.1 Elementary logic and binary systems
      2. 6.2 Combinatorial logic and logic gates
      3. 6.3 Functional description of the operation of gates
      4. 6.4 Some simple examples of combinatorial logic circuits
      5. 6.5 Sequential logic
      6. 6.6 Summary
    2. 7 Computers and programs
      1. 7.1 The essential architecture of a computer system
      2. 7.2 A look inside the central processing unit
      3. 7.3 The representation of instructions in a computer
      4. 7.4 The representation of data in a computer
      5. 7.5 The components of programs
      6. 7.6 Conditional branching and the program status word
      7. 7.7 Subroutines and stacks
      8. 7.8 Summary
    3. 8 Interfacing: the use of the computer as a component
      1. 8.1 Interfacing from the point of view of the programmer
      2. 8.2 Interfacing from the point of view of the processor
      3. 8.3 Interfacing from the point of view of the interface
      4. 8.4 Parallel and serial ports
      5. 8.5 Digital to analogue, and analogue to digital conversion
      6. 8.6 Polled, interrupt driven and direct memory access (DMA) interfaces
      7. 8.7 The Texas Instruments TMS320C30 Digital Signal Processor (DSP)
      8. 8.8 The MIDI interface
      9. 8.9 PC sound cards
      10. 8.10 Summary
  13. Part 5 Programming for sound generation and processing
    1. 9 Computer programming for musical applications
      1. 9.1 The need for computer programming
      2. 9.2 Types of programming language
      3. 9.3 Structured programming for music
      4. 9.4 Programming at control rate
      5. 9.5 Data generation and output
      6. 9.6 Data input and transformation
      7. 9.7 Summary
    2. 10 Programming for audio and visual synthesis
      1. 10.1 Programming at audio rate
      2. 10.2 The unit generator concept
      3. 10.3 Programming libraries
      4. 10.4 MIDAS
      5. 10.5 Audio synthesis and signal processing examples
      6. 10.6 Programming for audio-visual synthesis
      7. 10.7 Summary
  14. Part 6 Interface design for the future
    1. 11 Designing the musician—machine interface
      1. 11.1 Human—computer interaction
      2. 11.2 Styles of interface
      3. 11.3 >Models of user interaction
      4. 11.4 User interfaces in computer music
      5. 11.5 Suggested areas of change
      6. 11.6 Design exercise
      7. 11.7 Summary
  15. Index