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Digital SLR Photography All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Edition by Robert Correll

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Chapter 5: Panoramically Speaking

In This Chapter

arrow.png Shooting panorama frames

arrow.png Stitching, blending, and cropping

Shooting panoramas is fun and relatively painless. Plus, they evoke oohs and aahs from all who see them. It’s rewarding to find a good scene that you want to capture in a format wider or taller than a standard photo and then make it happen.

Like high dynamic range (HDR) photography, panorama photography means taking multiple photos of a scene and then using software to produce your final image (although some cameras now shoot and stitch panoramas together, alleviating the need for special software). You can even combine the two to make an HDR panorama.

In a panorama, though, you pan (move) the camera from frame to frame (up, down, left, or right; it doesn’t matter). Doing so captures more scenery than your lens sees in one shot, making it possible to produce really wide-angle panoramas with just about any lens. Afterward, the individual frames (with some overlap so the computer can identify common features) are stitched together in software. The final result is a single large image.

Shooting Pan-tastic Panoramas

remember.eps Remember three central points to when you’re shooting panoramas: ...

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