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Developments and Innovation in Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture and Storage Technology

Book Description

Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is the one advanced technology that conventional power generation cannot do without. CCS technology reduces the carbon footprint of power plants by capturing, and storing the CO2 emissions from burning fossil-fuels and biomass. This volume provides a comprehensive reference on the state of the art research, development and demonstration of carbon storage and utilisation, covering all the storage options and their environmental impacts. It critically reviews geological, terrestrial and ocean sequestration, including enhanced oil and gas recovery, as well as other advanced concepts such as industrial utilisation, mineral carbonation, biofixation and photocatalytic reduction.

  • Foreword written by Lord Oxburgh, Climate Science Peer
  • Comprehensively examines the different methods of storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) and the various concepts for utilisation
  • Reviews geological sequestration of CO2, including coverage of reservoir sealing and monitoring and modelling techniques used to verify geological sequestration of CO2

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Contributor contact details
  6. Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy
  7. Foreword
  8. Chapter 1: Overview of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technology
    1. Abstract:
    2. 1.1 Introduction
    3. 1.2 Greenhouse gas emissions and global climate change
    4. 1.3 Carbon management and stabilisation routes
    5. 1.4 Development and innovation in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport technology
    6. 1.5 Development and innovation in carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and utilisation technology
    7. 1.6 Future trends
    8. 1.7 Sources of further information and advice
    9. 1.8 Acknowledgements
  9. Part I: Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2)
    1. Chapter 2: Screening and selection criteria, and characterisation techniques for the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 2.1 Introduction
      3. 2.2 Screening for storage suitability and site selection
      4. 2.3 Site characterization
      5. 2.4 Estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity
      6. 2.5 Future trends
      7. 2.6 Sources of further information and advice
    2. Chapter 3: Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep saline aquifers and formations
      1. Abstract:
      2. 3.1 Inroduction
      3. 3.2 Saline aquifers
      4. 3.3 Trapping mechanisms
      5. 3.4 Modeling of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration
      6. 3.5 Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration pilot sites
      7. 3.6 Future trends
      8. 3.7 Conclusions
      9. 3.8 Acknowledgements
    3. Chapter 4: Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in oil and gas reservoirs and use for enhanced oil recovery (EOR)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 4.1 Introduction
      3. 4.2 Carbon dioxide (CO2) enhanced recovery mechanisms
      4. 4.3 Co-optimization of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and carbon storage
      5. 4.4 Future trends: geologic storage in tight rocks
      6. 4.5 Summary and conclusions
      7. 4.6 Sources of further information and advice
    4. Chapter 5: Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in unmineable coal seams and use for enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 5.1 Introduction
      3. 5.2 Storage in unmineable coal seams
      4. 5.3 Enhanced coalbed methane recovery
      5. 5.4 Competitive adsorption
      6. 5.5 Swelling and permeability
      7. 5.6 Mass transfer and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) modeling
      8. 5.7 Field tests
      9. 5.8 Future trends
      10. 5.9 Sources of further information and advice
  10. Part II: Maximising and verifying carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs
    1. Chapter 6: Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection design to maximise underground reservoir storage and enhanced oil recovery (EOR)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 6.1 Carbon storage in geological formations
      3. 6.2 Experiments of capillary trapping
      4. 6.3 Field-scale design of storage in aquifers
      5. 6.4 Storage in oilfields
      6. 6.5 Discussion and conclusions
      7. 6.6 Future trends
      8. 6.7 Sources of further information and advice
      9. 6.8 Acknowledgments
    2. Chapter 7: Capillary seals for trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) in underground reservoirs
      1. Abstract:
      2. 7.1 Introduction
      3. 7.2 Calculations of anticipated capillary pressures and seal capacities
      4. 7.3 Monte Carlo predictions of capillary pressure within a reservoir seal
      5. 7.4 Discussion
      6. 7.5 Conclusions
      7. 7.6 Future trends
      8. 7.7 Sources of further information and advice
      9. 7.8 Acknowledgements
    3. Chapter 8: Measurement and monitoring technologies for verification of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs
      1. Abstract:
      2. 8.1 Introduction
      3. 8.2 Background to storage site monitoring
      4. 8.3 Detection and measurement of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface
      5. 8.4 Detection and measurement of carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage to surface
      6. 8.5 Conclusions and future trends
      7. 8.6 Sources of further information and advice
    4. Chapter 9: Mathematical modeling of the long-term safety of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs
      1. Abstract:
      2. 9.1 Introduction
      3. 9.2 Coupled processes: a challenge for mathematical models
      4. 9.3 Ilustrative modeling applications
      5. 9.4 Conclusions
      6. 9.5 Acknowledgements
  11. Part III: Terrestrial and ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) and environmental impacts
    1. Chapter 10: Terrestrial sequestration of carbon dioxide (C2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 10.1 Introduction
      3. 10.2 The terrestrial pool and its role in the global carbon cycle
      4. 10.3 Emissions from agricultural versus other activities
      5. 10.4 Basic principles of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems
      6. 10.5 Potential of terrestrial sequestration
      7. 10.6 Challenges of terrestrial sequestration
      8. 10.7 Extrapolation
      9. 10.8 Soil and terrestrial carbon as indicators of climate change
      10. 10.9 Conclusions
    2. Chapter 11: Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 11.1 Introduction
      3. 11.2 History of carbon dioxide (CO2) deep ocean storage proposals
      4. 11.3 Legal constraints of deep ocean storage of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      5. 11.4 Sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) for ocean storage
      6. 11.5 Ocean structure
      7. 11.6 Properties of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      8. 11.7 Modeling of carbon dioxide (CO2) release
      9. 11.8 Injection of carbon dioxide, water and pulverized limestone (CO2/H2O/CaCO3) emulsion
      10. 11.9 Future trends
      11. 11.10 Conclusions
      12. 11.11 Sources of further information and advice
    3. Chapter 12: Environmental risks and impacts of carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage in terrestrial ecosystems
      1. Abstract:
      2. 12.1 Introduction
      3. 12.2 Leak scenarios
      4. 12.3 Impacts of terrestrial leakage
      5. 12.4 Atmospheric enrichment of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      6. 12.5 Leak monitoring techniques
      7. 12.6 Conclusions and future trends
      8. 12.7 Sources of further information and advice
    4. Chapter 13: Environmental risks and performance assessment of carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage in marine ecosystems
      1. Abstract:
      2. 13.1 Introduction
      3. 13.2 The physical and chemical behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the marine system
      4. 13.3 Marine ecosystem impacts of carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage
      5. 13.4 Leak monitoring options
      6. 13.5 Mitigation of leaks
      7. 13.6 Future trends
      8. 13.7 Sources of further information and advice
  12. Part IV: Advanced concepts for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and utilisation
    1. Chapter 14: Industrial utilization of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 14.1 Introduction
      3. 14.2 The conditions for using carbon dioxide (CO2)
      4. 14.3 The carbon dioxide (CO2) sources and its value
      5. 14.4 Technological uses of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      6. 14.5 Biological enhanced utilization
      7. 14.6 Carbon dioxide (CO2) conversion as ‘storage’ of excess electric energy or intermittent energies
      8. 14.7 Production of chemicals
      9. 14.8 Conclusions and future trends
      10. 14.9 Sources of further information and advice
    2. Chapter 15: Biofixation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by microorganisms
      1. Abstract:
      2. 15.1 Introduction
      3. 15.2 Basic principles and methods
      4. 15.3 Carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation microorganisms: chemoautotrophs and photoautotrophs
      5. 15.4 Carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation by microalgae
      6. 15.5 Advantages and limitations
      7. 15.6 Future trends
    3. Chapter 16: Mineralisation of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 16.1 Introduction
      3. 16.2 Basic principles and methods
      4. 16.3 Technologies and potential applications
      5. 16.4 Related issues
      6. 16.5 Future trends
      7. 16.6 Sources of further information and advice
      8. Appendix Energy efficiency of mineral carbonation processes
    4. Chapter 17: Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      1. Abstract:
      2. 17.1 Introduction
      3. 17.2 Fundamentals of photocatalysis
      4. 17.3 Renewable energy from photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2)
      5. Experimental
      6. 17.4 Advantages and limitations of photocatalytic processes
      7. 17.5 Future trends
      8. 17.6 Sources of further information and advice
  13. Index