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Designing Wide Area Networks and Internetworks: A Practical Guide

Book Description

Speedy, reliable, and secure communications are essential for maintaining an organizationis competitiveness, and Wide Area Networks and Internetworks are quickly proliferating in order to meet this need. Building such a network, however, can be a daunting task; a large investment is required, and organizations must navigate through a dizzying array of technological and design options. /P>

Designing Wide Area Networks and Internetworks clarifies this complex task by outlining a top-down, step-by-step process for constructing a WAN or internetwork that is effective for your organization. This book will guide you through the steps of determining requirements, designing the network structure, choosing appropriate technologies, and evaluating results. The authoris practical approach distills exactly what you need to know about networking theory and technological background in order to accomplish a given task.

On the financial side, it is important to note that the difference between a good design and a poor one can represent many millions of dollars per year. This book presents a quantitative, business-oriented approach to network design. It focuses on the economic and performance characteristics of various network technologies and carrier service options, and explains the conditions for which each is optimal.

Table of Contents

  1. About This eBook
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Dedication Page
  5. Contents
  6. Preface
    1. Audience
    2. Prerequisite Background
    3. Organization of This Book
    4. Acknowledgments
  7. Part I: Beginning the Internetwork Design Process
    1. 1. Networks and Internetworks
      1. 1.1. Data Communications and Organizational Competitiveness
      2. 1.2. Why Is Building an Internetwork so Challenging?
      3. 1.3. Enterprise Networks, Intranets, and Extranets
      4. 1.4. What Changes When You Cross a Street?
      5. 1.5. Evolution and Change
      6. 1.6. The Real World Impinges
    2. 2. The Internetwork Design Process: Overview
      1. 2.1. Phase 1: Definition of Requirements
      2. 2.2. Phase 2: Preliminary Design
      3. 2.3. Phase 3: Management Review
      4. 2.4. Phase 4: Final Design
    3. 3. Definition of Requirements
      1. 3.1. Identify Access Locations
      2. 3.2. Identify Application Requirements
      3. 3.3. Identify Traffic Patterns
      4. 3.4. Determine Performance Requirements
      5. 3.5. Determine Security Requirements
      6. 3.6. Consider Cost
  8. Part II: The Preliminary Design Phase
    1. 4. Preliminary Design: Overview
      1. 4.1. Consider the Existing Network and Its Users
      2. 4.2. Steps in the Preliminary Design Phase
    2. 5. Circuit Costs and Cost Optimization Techniques
      1. 5.1. Elements of Internetwork Costs
      2. 5.2. Elements of Circuit Costs
      3. 5.3. Cheaper by the Dozen
      4. 5.4. Concentration and Aggregation
      5. 5.5. Statistical Multiplexing
      6. 5.6. Distance-Sensitive Tariffs
      7. 5.7. Distance-Insensitive Tariffs
      8. 5.8. Distance-Sensitive versus Distance-Insensitive Tariffs
      9. 5.9. The Bent Straw
    3. 6. Selecting Transmission Technologies
      1. 6.1. Roles for Each Transmission Technology
      2. 6.2. Dedicated Circuits (Leased Lines)
      3. 6.3. Parallel Circuits and Inverse Multiplexing
      4. 6.4. Channelized Circuits
      5. 6.5. Circuit Switching
      6. 6.6. Analog Dialup
      7. 6.7. ISDN
      8. 6.8. Frame Relay
      9. 6.9. ATM
      10. 6.10. Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS)
      11. 6.11. Direct Use of SONET
      12. 6.12. IP Data over Cable TV Infrastructure
      13. 6.13. ADSL and VDSL
      14. 6.14. CDPD and Other Wireless Technologies
      15. 6.15. Cryptographic Encapsulation over the Public Internet: The iVPN
    4. 7. Determining the Levels of Hierarchy
      1. 7.1. The Concept of Hierarchy
      2. 7.2. Partitioning the Internetwork
      3. 7.3. What Constitutes a Hierarchical Layer?
      4. 7.4. How Many Layers?
      5. 7.5. Hierarchy and Network Topological Design
    5. 8. Identifying Backbone Locations
      1. 8.1. Higher-Capacity Circuits and Services
      2. 8.2. Higher Availability
      3. 8.3. Additional Costs
      4. 8.4. Geographic Expanse
    6. 9. Creating a Preliminary Access Design
      1. 9.1. Dedicated (Business or Organizational) Access
      2. 9.2. Switched (Residential) Access
      3. 9.3. Bypassing the Carriers
    7. 10. Developing Strategies for Access Homing
      1. 10.1. Single Homing
      2. 10.2. Dual Homing
      3. 10.3. The String of Pearls
    8. 11. Creating a Preliminary Backbone Topological Design
      1. 11.1. Fundamental Topologies
      2. 11.2. Creating the Backbone Design
    9. 12. Naming, Addressing, and Routing
      1. 12.1. Naming and the Domain Name System (DNS)
      2. 12.2. Addressing
      3. 12.3. Routing
    10. 13. Security
      1. 13.1. Threats to Network Security
      2. 13.2. Fundamentals of Network Security
      3. 13.3. Security Solutions
      4. 13.4. Perimeter Security
    11. 14. The Public Internet: Unique Design Considerations
      1. 14.1. Evolution of Today’s Internet
      2. 14.2. Structure of the Internet Today
      3. 14.3. Direct and Shared Interconnections (Public and Private Peering)
      4. 14.4. Traffic Characterization in Light of Shortest-Exit Routing
      5. 14.5. International Internet Traffic Flows
      6. 14.6. Traffic Statistics
      7. 14.7. Internet Access
    12. 15. Network Management
      1. 15.1. Network Management versus System Management
      2. 15.2. Operational Tasks
      3. 15.3. Network Management in Perspective
    13. 16. Validation of the Design against the Requirements
      1. 16.1. Performance
      2. 16.2. Verification of Functionality
      3. 16.3. Security
      4. 16.4. Availability
  9. Part III: The Management Review Phase
    1. 17. Management Review: Financial Analysis
      1. 17.1. Cost Categories
      2. 17.2. Expenses over Time
      3. 17.3. Revenues: The Benefits
      4. 17.4. Profitability: Calling the Shots
      5. 17.5. The Budget
  10. Part IV: The Final Design Phase
    1. 18. Final Design: Overview
    2. 19. Selection of Carriers and Vendors
      1. 19.1. The Carriers
      2. 19.2. The Equipment Vendors
      3. 19.3. The Request for Proposal (RFP)
  11. Index