You are previewing Designing Sound for Animation, 2nd Edition.
O'Reilly logo
Designing Sound for Animation, 2nd Edition

Book Description

Sound is just as crucial an aspect to your animation as your visuals. Whether you're looking to create a score, ambient noise, dialog, or a complete soundtrack, you'll need sound for your piece. This nuts-and-bolts guide to sound design for animation will explain to you the theory and workings behind sound for image, and provide an overview of the stems and production path to help you create your soundtrack. Follow the sound design process along animated shorts and learn how to use the tools and techniques of the trade. Enhance your piece and learn how to design sound for animation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Dedication
  6. Contents
  7. List of Figures and Tables
  8. About the Author
  9. Credits
  10. Acknowledgments
  11. Introduction
    1. Overview
    2. The Elements of a Soundtrack
    3. Scope of Book
    4. Using This Book
    5. About the 2nd Edition
    6. Online Content
  12. Chapter 1. Foundations of Audio for Image
    1. Overview
    2. Perception of Sound
      1. Sound
      2. Hearing Versus Listening
      3. Localization
      4. Acoustics
      5. Rhythm and Tempo
      6. Noise and Silence
    3. Physics of Sound
      1. Sound Waves
      2. Frequency
      3. Amplitude
      4. Timbre
      5. Wavelength
      6. Speed of Sound
    4. Digital Audio
      1. Digitizing Audio
      2. Sampling Rates
      3. Bit-Depths
      4. Audio Compression
  13. Chapter 2. Sound Design Theory
    1. Overview
    2. Sound Classifications
      1. Chion Classifications
      2. Diegetic and Non-Diegetic Sound
    3. Narrative Functions
      1. Guided Perception
      2. Drawing the Audience into the Narrative
      3. Directing the Eye
      4. Establishing or Clarifying Point of View
      5. Clarifying the Subtext
      6. Contrasting Reality and Subjectivity
      7. Extending the Field of Vision
      8. Tension and Release
      9. Continuity
      10. Promoting Character Development
      11. Theoretical Concepts Specific to Dialogue
      12. Theoretical Concepts Specific to Score
      13. Theoretical Concepts Specific to SFX
    4. Interpreting Picture Edits
      1. Overview
      2. Shots
        1. Framing
        2. Camera Placement
        3. Camera Movement
        4. Movement of Objects
        5. Perspective Shot (POV)
        6. Insert Shots and Cutaways
      3. Cuts
      4. Transitions
        1. Dissolves
        2. Wipes
        3. Fades
        4. Sound Transitions
      5. Scenes
        1. Parallel Edit
        2. Montage Sequence
        3. Time-Lapse and Flashback Sequences
    5. Conclusion
  14. Chapter 3. Dialogue
    1. Overview
    2. Principal Dialogue
    3. Narration
    4. Group ADR and Walla
    5. Developing the Script
    6. Casting Voice Talent
    7. Caricature
    8. Recording Dialogue
      1. The Recording Script
      2. Directing Voice Talent
      3. The ADR Studio
      4. Microphones
      5. Recording Set-Up
      6. Cueing a Session
    9. Preparing Tracks for Lip Sync
    10. Lip Sync Animation
    11. ADR
    12. Evaluating Recorded Dialogue
    13. Dialogue Editing
    14. Designed Languages
  15. Chapter 4. Music
    1. Overview
    2. Underscore
    3. Source Music
    4. Songs
    5. Title, Montage, and End Credit Sequences
    6. Workflow for Original Score
      1. Rationale for Original Score
      2. Temp Music
      3. The Spotting Session
      4. Writing Original Cues
      5. The Scoring Session
    7. Workflow for Production Libraries
      1. Production Libraries
      2. Searching a Library
      3. Managing a Project
      4. Developing Cues
      5. Licensing Cues
    8. Workflow for Copy-Protected Music
      1. Overview
      2. Rights Versus License
      3. Synchronization, Master, and Videogram License
      4. Public Domain
      5. Fair Use
      6. Parody
      7. Music Supervision
    9. Historical Trends in Animation Scoring
      1. The Golden Age
      2. The Television Age
      3. The Animation Renaissance
  16. Chapter 5. Sound Effects (SFX)
    1. Overview
    2. The SFX Stem
    3. Temp Tracks and Spotting Sessions
    4. The Sound Department
    5. Sound Editors
    6. Commercial SFX Libraries
    7. Searching SFX Libraries
    8. Developing an Original SFX Library
      1. Creating an Original Library
      2. Field Recorders
      3. Field Microphones
      4. Field Accessories
      5. Suggestions for Field Recording
        1. Record like an Editor
        2. Objectivity
        3. Area-Specific Frequency Response
        4. Signal-To-Noise Ratio
        5. Dynamic Range
      6. File Management
    9. The Sound Designer
    10. Performing Design Elements
  17. Chapter 6. Foley
    1. Overview
    2. The Foley Stage
    3. Spotting Foley
    4. The Foley Artist
    5. Footsteps
    6. Props
    7. The Cloth Pass
    8. Cueing a Session
    9. The Foley Mixer
      1. Overview
      2. Recording with Preparatory Cues
      3. Playlisting
      4. Looping
    10. Foley Editing
  18. Chapter 7. The Production Path
    1. Overview
    2. Preproduction
      1. Overview
      2. Enlisting a Sound Crew
      3. Developing a Soundtrack Budget
      4. Project Management
      5. Production Standards
      6. Release Formats
    3. Production
      1. Overview
      2. Creating Temp Tracks
      3. Production Tasks for the Sound and Music Departments
    4. Postproduction
      1. Overview
      2. Picture Lock
      3. Postproduction Tasks for the Sound and Music Departments
  19. Chapter 8. Sound Editing
    1. Overview
    2. Syncing Sound To Picture
    3. Trimming and Cutting
    4. Fades
    5. Compositing Takes
    6. Ring-Outs
    7. Time-Scaling
    8. Pitch Shifting
    9. Vari-Speed
    10. Reverse and Rewind
    11. Sound Replacement
    12. Noise Reduction
    13. Side-Chain Gate
    14. Futzing
    15. Doppler
    16. Looping
    17. Preparing Tracks for Delivery to the Mix
  20. Chapter 9. The Final Mix
    1. Overview
    2. The Re-Recording Mixer(s)
    3. Speaker Calibration
    4. Dynamic Range
    5. Configuring the Session
    6. Pre-Dubs
    7. Creating the Stems and Printmaster
    8. The Stereo Mix
      1. Panning
      2. Leveling
      3. Signal Processing
        1. Reverb
        2. Equalization (EQ)
        3. Peak Limiting
    9. The Multi-Channel Mix
      1. The Direct/Ambient Perspective
      2. The “Inside the Band” Perspective
    10. Mastering for Various Release Formats
    11. Bouncing to Disk or Tracks
    12. Encoding
    13. Layback
  21. Chapter 10. Case Studies
  22. Bibliography
  23. Index