You are previewing Design Is The Problem.

Design Is The Problem

Cover of Design Is The Problem by Nathan Shedroff Published by Rosenfeld Media
  1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O'Reilly
  2. How to Use this Book
    1. Who Should Read This Book?
    2. What’s in This Book?
      1. Section 1: Reduce
      2. Section 2: Reuse
      3. Section 3: Recycle
      4. Section 4: Restore
      5. Section 5: Process
    3. What Comes with This Book?
    4. Why a Book and Not Just a PDF?
  3. Frequently asked Questions
    1. What is sustainability?
    2. Why does being sustainable cost more—or does it?
    3. Is climate change proven?
    4. What’s a carbon footprint?
    5. Are hybrids really better than other cars?
    6. Is nuclear power a more sustainable energy option?
    7. What can I do to become more sustainable?
    8. As a designer, what can I do to make the world more sustainable?
  4. foreword
  5. Introduction
    1. What Is Sustainability?
    2. Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?
  6. CHAPTER 1
    1. What Is Sustainability?
      1. What Is a Systems Perspective?
      2. Diversity and Resiliency
      3. Centralization and Decentralization
      4. Cooperation and Competition
      5. Ecological Vitality
      6. Social Vitality
      7. Financial Vitality
      8. An Ecosystem of Stakeholders
      9. A Careful Balance
  7. CHAPTER 2
    1. How Is Sustainability Measured?
      1. You Get What You Measure
      2. Social Measures
      3. Environmental Measures
      4. Financial Measures
      5. Putting It All Together
      6. A Better Way?
  8. CHAPTER 3
    1. What Are the Approaches to Sustainability?
      1. Natural Capitalism
      2. Cradle to Cradle
      3. Biomimicry
      4. Life Cycle Analysis
      5. Social Return on Investment
      6. The Natural Step™
      7. Total Beauty
      8. Sustainability Helix
      9. Other Frameworks
      10. Putting Them All Together
  9. CHAPTER 4
    1. Design for Use
      1. Usability
      2. Simplicity Versus Clarity
      3. Accessibility
      4. Meaning
  10. CHAPTER 5
    1. Dematerialization
      1. Design for Efficiency
      2. Less Really Is More
      3. Vampire Power
  11. CHAPTER 6
    1. Substitution
      1. Material Substitution
      2. Detoxification
      3. PVC as a Toxin
  12. CHAPTER 7
    1. Localization
      1. The Power of Local
      2. Is Buying Local Really the Best?
  13. CHAPTER 8
    1. Transmaterialization
      1. The Metamorphosis of Transmaterialization
      2. Turning a Service into a Product
      3. What Is a Service?
  14. CHAPTER 9
    1. Informationalization
      1. Sending the Recipe
      2. Taking the Recipe Concept Even Further
  15. CHAPTER 10
    1. Design for Durability
      1. Planned Obsolescence—The Downfall of Durability
      2. How to Design Products for Sustainability
  16. CHAPTER 11
    1. Design for Reuse
      1. Two Types of Reuse
      2. Think Long-Term Use
  17. CHAPTER 12
    1. Design for Disassembly
      1. Disassembly, Step by Step
  18. CHAPTER 13
    1. Close the Loop
      1. Create Take-Back Programs
      2. River and Lake Economies
      3. Industrial Estates
  19. CHAPTER 14
    1. Design for Effectiveness
      1. Extrapolate into the Future
  20. CHAPTER 15
    1. Design for Systems
      1. Leverage Points for Intervention
      2. Work from the Inside Out
      3. A Note About Caution
  21. CHAPTER 16
    1. Innovating Solutions
      1. The Strategic Innovation Process
      2. The Strategy Phase
      3. The Development Process
  22. CHAPTER 17
    1. Measuring Results
      1. Global Reporting Framework
      2. Balanced Scorecard
      3. Other Ratings and Metrics
      4. Label Types
      5. Reveal Rating System
  23. CHAPTER 18
    1. Declaring Results
      1. LOHAS
      2. Green Gauge
      3. Conscious Consumers
      4. Cultural Creatives
      5. What Is Marketing?
      6. What to Say (and Not)
  24. CHAPTER 19
    1. Conclusion
  25. Appendix A
    1. Super Summary and Checklists
      1. Basic Checklist
      2. Detailed Checklist
  26. Appendix B
    1. Resources
      1. Books
      2. Articles
      3. Online Documents
      4. Web Sites
  27. Acknowledgments
  28. Photo and Illustration Credits
  29. About the Author
  30. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O'Reilly
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Section 3:

Recycle

We’ve all heard about the need to recycle, but few of us do it to the extent that we could, and this causes a great deal more environmental impact than necessary. For example, in 2005 (the latest year for the EPA to report), U.S. citizens recycled about a third of what went into the municipal waste stream. That’s a steady improvement, but not a figure to be proud of, nor a sustainable strategy. The items with the best recycling rates included containers and packaging (roughly, 40 percent). In addition, approximately 60 percent of yard waste was recycled overall, although far less food waste. However, to temper all of these gains, the overall amount of trash is increasing rapidly. From 1980 to 2005, U.S. citizens generated ...

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