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Design For Kids

Book Description

Emotion. Ego. Impatience. Stubbornness. Characteristics like these make creating sites and apps for kids a daunting proposition. However, with a bit of knowledge, you can design experiences that help children think, play, and learn. With Design for Kids, you'll learn how to create digital products for today's connected generation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Dedication Page
  5. How to Use This Book
  6. Frequently Asked Questions
  7. Foreword
  8. Introduction
  9. CHAPTER 1 Kids and Design
    1. Designing for Kids, Then…
    2. …And Now
    3. The Good and Bad News
  10. CHAPTER 2 Playing and Learning
    1. So Which Is It? Playing or Learning?
    2. Designing for Kids vs. Designing for Adults
      1. Challenge
      2. Feedback
      3. Trust
      4. Change
    3. The Similarities Between Kids and Adults
      1. Consistency
      2. Purpose
      3. Surprise
      4. Lagniappe
    4. A Framework for Digital Design
      1. Absorb
      2. Analyze
      3. Architect
      4. Assess
    5. Chapter Checklist
  11. CHAPTER 3 Development and Cognition
    1. The World According to Piaget
      1. Schemata
      2. Assimilation
      3. Accommodation
      4. Equilibrium
    2. Theory of Cognitive Development
    3. The Sensorimotor Stage: From Birth to Age 2
      1. Separate Selves
      2. Object Permanence
      3. Early Representational Thought
    4. The Preoperational Stage: Ages 2–6
      1. Egocentrism
      2. Conservation
    5. The Concrete Operational Stage: Ages 7–11
      1. Inductive Logic
      2. Reversibility
    6. The Formal Operations Stage: Ages 12–Adult
      1. Logic
      2. Abstract Thought
      3. Problem Solving
    7. Chapter Checklist
  12. CHAPTER 4 Kids 2–4: Little People, Big Expectations
    1. Who Are They?
    2. Create a Clear Visual Ranking
    3. Use a Few Bright Colors
    4. Assign a Single Behavior to On-Screen Elements
    5. Maintain a Strong Separation Between Foreground and Background
    6. Make Literal Use of Pictures and Icons
    7. Use Clear Audio Cues
    8. Support, Don’t Enforce, Gender Differences
    9. Chapter Checklist
    10. Emil Ovemar
  13. CHAPTER 5 Kids 4–6: The “Muddy Middle”
    1. Who Are They?
    2. Make It Social
    3. Make Learning Part of the Game
    4. Give Feedback and Reinforcement
    5. Keep It Free-Form
    6. Keep It Challenging
    7. Chapter Checklist
  14. CHAPTER 6 Kids 6–8: The Big Kids
    1. Who Are They?
    2. Outside Influences
    3. Leveling Up
    4. Explain, Explain, and Explain Again
    5. Saving, Storing, Sharing, and Collecting
      1. High Scores
      2. Sharing
    6. Playing by the Rules
    7. We Need Some Stinkin’ Badges
    8. Stranger Danger
      1. Designing Canned Chat
      2. The Anonymity Factor
    9. Chapter Checklist
    10. Linnette Attai
  15. CHAPTER 7 Kids 8–10: The “Cool” Factor
    1. Who Are They?
    2. Getting Away with It
    3. Provide Instructions After Failure
    4. Up the Complexity
    5. Ads Aren’t Content
    6. “Poopyhead” Is a Perfectly Acceptable User Name
    7. A Matter of Trust
    8. It’s OK to Lie if Nobody Gets Hurt
    9. Chapter Checklist
  16. CHAPTER 8 Kids 10–12: Growing Up
    1. Who Are They?
    2. Take The Guesswork Out
    3. Let Kids Tell Their Story
    4. Mobile First
    5. Celebrate Individuality
    6. Specialize
    7. Chapter Checklist
  17. CHAPTER 9 Design Research
    1. General Guidelines
      1. Keep It Moving
      2. Let Them Lead
      3. Provide Closure
      4. Have an Agenda
      5. Be Honest
    2. What You Need to Know About Informed Consent
    3. Recruiting Kids as Participants
    4. Researching with the Littlest Users
      1. Child-Parent Sessions
      2. Research Techniques
        1. Interviews
        2. Contextual Inquiry
        3. Lab Research
    5. Researching with the Control Freaks
      1. Get ’em Talking
      2. Channel Your Inner Indiana Jones
      3. Bring Out the Crayons
    6. Researching with the Experts
      1. Stick to One-on-Ones
      2. Go Back to School
      3. Lab Testing
      4. Surveys
    7. Chapter Checklist
    8. Catalina N. Bock
  18. CHAPTER 10 An App for All Ages
    1. 2–4-Year-Olds
    2. 4–6-Year-Olds
    3. 6–8-Year-Olds
    4. 8–10-Year-Olds
    5. 10–12-Year-Olds
    6. Chapter Checklist
  19. CHAPTER 11 Putting It All Together
    1. First, the Questions
      1. Why?
      2. Who?
      3. What?
    2. Next, the Design Particulars
      1. Navigation and Wayfinding
      2. Design Patterns
      3. Data Collection
      4. Community and Social
      5. Advertising
    3. Finally, Getting It Out There
      1. Websites
      2. Games and Apps
    4. Designing for Kids…and Beyond
  20. Index
  21. Acknowledgments
  22. About the Author