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Definitive VoiceXML™

Book Description

The start-to-finish guide to building enterprise-class VoiceXML applications.

  • Code examples and UML diagrams provided for each VoiceXML element

  • Fully developed VoiceXML applications using Java servlets, JSP, and .NET

  • Detailed coverage of text-to-speech and automatic speech recognition technologies

  • "XML is not a spoken language, but thanks to VoiceXML, it is the language of choice for developing spoken interfaces. If you want to voice-enable your applications and Web sites, this book speaks your language."

    —Charles F. Goldfarb

    Definitive VoiceXML bridges the gap between enterprise computing and telephony engineering, demonstrating exactly how to build new enterprise-class voice applications and voice-enable existing applications. It's the first book that delivers the depth and breadth of knowledge needed by both enterprise and telephony developers, thoroughly addressing the unique challenges of building voice systems for business.

  • VoiceXML in depth: its role, goals, and key techniques

  • Effective ways to architect and integrate enterprise voice applications

  • Detailed case studies utilizing VoiceXML, Java servlets, JSP, and .NET

  • Thorough coverage of the W3C VXML 2.0 standard

  • Speech Recognition Grammar Format (SRGF) and Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML)

  • Complete VoiceXML language reference

  • Whether you're developing systems for customer service, finance, travel, wireless commerce, or anything else, Definitive VoiceXML gives you the proven techniques you need to maximize performance, reliability, and ROI.

    Part of The Charles F. Goldfarb Definitive XML Series

    Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
    2. The Charles F. Goldfarb Definitive XML Series
    3. Foreword
    4. Acknowledgements
    5. VoiceXML and voice services
      1. Voice services and applications
      2. What is VoiceXML?
      3. Road map to the book and other resources
    6. VoiceXML essentials
      1. Forms
      2. Procedural elements
      3. Prompt and audio prompts
      4. VoiceXML variable support
      5. Form items
      6. Mixed initiative forms
      7. Menus
      8. Events
      9. Grammars
      10. Organizing code into VoiceXML applications
    7. VoiceXML language reference
      1. VoiceXML document structure
      2. Attribute types
      3. Element categories
      4. assign
      5. audio
      6. block
      7. break
      8. catch
      9. choice
      10. clear
      11. disconnect
      12. else
      13. elseif
      14. emphasis
      15. enumerate
      16. error
      17. example
      18. exit
      19. field
      20. filled
      21. form
      22. goto
      23. grammar
      24. help
      25. if
      26. initial
      27. item
      28. lexicon
      29. link
      30. log
      31. mark
      32. menu
      33. meta
      34. metadata
      35. noinput
      36. nomatch
      37. object
      38. one-of
      39. option
      40. paragraph
      41. param
      42. phoneme
      43. prompt
      44. property
      45. prosody
      46. record
      47. reprompt
      48. return
      49. rule
      50. ruleref
      51. say-as
      52. script
      53. sentence
      54. subdialog
      55. submit
      56. tag
      57. throw
      58. token
      59. transfer
      60. value
      61. var
      62. voice
      63. vxml
    8. Enterprise voice application architecture
      1. Example: JSP parcel tracking application
      2. A “thick-client” banking example
      3. The Auto Attendant: generating VoiceXML using XSLT and ASP.NET
    9. Voice services
      1. Building voice services
      2. Deploying a high-availability system
      3. Engineering new services
      4. Outsourcing
    10. ECMAScript overview
      1. Syntax
      2. Variables
      3. Operators
      4. Flow control
      5. Functions and objects
      6. Object-based scripting
    11. HTTP primer
      1. An HTTP interaction
      2. GET versus POST
      3. Cookies
    12. Form Interpretation Algorithm
    13. Speech Recognition Grammar Format
      1. Element types
      2. VoiceXML built-in grammars
      3. Grammar scope
    14. Speech Synthesis Markup Language
      1. Element types
      2. Additional element types defined by SSML
    15. UML Class Diagram primer
    16. Useful resources
      1. Speech development tools
      2. W3C specifications
      3. Other specifications
    17. Index