You are previewing Database Design: Know It All.
O'Reilly logo
Database Design: Know It All

Book Description

This book brings all of the elements of database design together in a single volume, saving the reader the time and expense of making multiple purchases. It consolidates both introductory and advanced topics, thereby covering the gamut of database design methodology ? from ER and UML techniques, to conceptual data modeling and table transformation, to storing XML and querying moving objects databases.

The proposed book expertly combines the finest database design material from the Morgan Kaufmann portfolio. Individual chapters are derived from a select group of MK books authored by the best and brightest in the field. These chapters are combined into one comprehensive volume in a way that allows it to be used as a reference work for those interested in new and developing aspects of database design.

This book represents a quick and efficient way to unite valuable content from leading database design experts, thereby creating a definitive, one-stop-shopping opportunity for customers to receive the information they would otherwise need to round up from separate sources.

  • Chapters contributed by various recognized experts in the field let the reader remain up to date and fully informed from multiple viewpoints.
  • Details multiple relational models and modeling languages, enhancing the reader’s technical expertise and familiarity with design-related requirements specification.
  • Coverage of both theory and practice brings all of the elements of database design together in a single volume, saving the reader the time and expense of making multiple purchases.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Brief Table of Contents
  3. Table of Contents
  4. List of Figures
  5. List of Tables
  6. Copyright Page
  7. About This Book
  8. Contributing Authors
  9. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. 1.1. Data and Database Management
    2. 1.2. The Database Life Cycle
    3. 1.3. Conceptual Data Modeling
    4. 1.4. Summary
    5. 1.5. Literature Summary
  10. Chapter 2. Entity–Relationship Concepts
    1. 2.1. Introduction to ER Concepts
    2. 2.2. Further Details of ER Modeling
    3. 2.3. Additional ER Concepts
    4. 2.4. Case Study
    5. 2.5. Normalization: Preliminaries
    6. 2.6. Functional Dependencies
    7. 2.7. Lossless Decompositions
    8. 2.8. Normal Forms
    9. 2.9. Additional Design Considerations
    10. 2.10 Suggestions for Further Reading
  11. Chapter 3. Data Modeling in UML
    1. 3.1. Introduction
    2. 3.2. Object Orientation
    3. 3.3. Attributes
    4. 3.4. Associations
    5. 3.5. Set-Comparison Constraints
    6. 3.6. Subtyping
    7. 3.7. Other Constraints and Derivation Rules
    8. 3.8. Mapping from ORM to UML
    9. 3.9. Summary
    10. 3.10. Literature Summary
  12. Chapter 4. Requirements Analysis and Conceptual Data Modeling
    1. 4.1. Introduction
    2. 4.2. Requirements Analysis
    3. 4.3. Conceptual Data Modeling
    4. 4.4. View Integration
    5. 4.5. Entity Clustering for ER Models
    6. 4.6. Summary
    7. 4.7. Literature Summary
  13. Chapter 5. Logical Database Design
    1. 5.1. Introduction
    2. 5.2. Overview of the Transformations Required
    3. 5.3. Table Specification
    4. 5.4. Basic Column Definition
    5. 5.5. Primary Key Specification
    6. 5.6. Foreign Key Specification
    7. 5.7. Table and Column Names
    8. 5.8. Logical Data Model Notations
    9. 5.9. Summary
  14. Chapter 6. Normalization
    1. 6.1. Translating an ER Diagram into Relations
    2. 6.2. Normal Forms
    3. 6.3. First Normal Form
    4. 6.4. Second Normal Form
    5. 6.5. Third Normal Form
    6. 6.6. Boyce-Codd Normal Form
    7. 6.7. Fourth Normal Form
    8. 6.8. Normalized Relations and Database Performance
    9. 6.9 Further Reading
  15. Chapter 7. Physical Database Design
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. Inputs to Database Design
    3. 7.3. Options Available to the Database Designer
    4. 7.4. Design Decisions that Do Not Affect Program Logic
    5. 7.5. Crafting Queries to Run Faster
    6. 7.6. Logical Schema Decisions
    7. 7.7. Views
    8. 7.8. Summary
  16. Chapter 8. Denormalization
    1. 8.1. Basics of Normalization
    2. 8.2. Common Types of Denormalization
    3. 8.3. Table Denormalization Strategy
    4. 8.4. Example of Denormalization
    5. 8.5. Summary
    6. 8.6 Further Reading
  17. Chapter 9. Business Metadata Infrastructure
    1. 9.1. Introduction
    2. 9.2. Types of Business Metadata
    3. 9.3. The Metadata Warehouse
    4. 9.4. Delivery Considerations
    5. 9.5. Integration
    6. 9.6. Administrative Issues
    7. 9.7. Metadata Repository: Buy or Build?
    8. 9.8. The Build Considerations
    9. 9.9. The Third Alternative: Use a Preexisting Repository
    10. 9.10. Summary
  18. Chapter 10. Storing
    1. 10.1. Introduction
    2. 10.2. The Need for Persistence
    3. 10.3. SQL/XML's XML Type
    4. 10.4. Accessing Persistent XML Data
    5. 10.5. XML “On the Fly”: Nonpersistent XML Data
    6. 10.6. Summary
  19. Chapter 11. Modeling and Querying Current Movement
    1. 11.1. Location Management
    2. 11.2. MOST—A Data Model for Current and Future Movement
    3. 11.3. FTL—A Query Language Based on Future Temporal Logic
    4. 11.4. Location Updates—Balancing Update Cost and Imprecision
    5. 11.5. The Uncertainty of the Trajectory of a Moving Object
    6. 11.6. Practice
    7. 11.7. Literature Notes
  20. Index
    1. A
    2. B
    3. C
    4. D
    5. E
    6. F
    7. G
    8. H
    9. I
    10. J
    11. K
    12. L
    13. M
    14. N
    15. O
    16. P
    17. Q
    18. R
    19. S
    20. T
    21. U
    22. V
    23. W
    24. X
    25. Y