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Data Protection for Virtual Data Centers

Book Description

Essential information on how to protect data in virtual environments!

Virtualization is changing the data center architecture and as a result, data protection is is quickly evolving as well. This unique book, written by an industry expert with over eighteen years of data storage/backup experience, shows you how to approach, protect, and manage data in a virtualized environment. You'll get up to speed on data protection problems, explore the data protection technologies available today, see how to adapt to virtualization, and more. The book uses a "good, better, best" approach, exploring best practices for backup, high availability, disaster recovery, business continuity, and more.

  • Covers best practices and essential information on protecting data in virtualized enterprise environments

  • Shows you how to approach, protect, and manage data while also meeting such challenges as return on investment, existing service level agreements (SLAs), and more

  • Helps system and design architects understand data protection issues and technologies in advance, so they can design systems to meet the challenges

  • Explains how to make absolutely critical services such as file services and e-mail more available without sacrificing protection

  • Offers best practices and solutions for backup, availability, disaster recovery, and others

  • This is a must-have guide for any Windows server and application administrator who is charged with data recovery and maintaining higher uptimes.

    Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
    2. Dear Reader,
    3. Acknowledgments
    4. About the Author
      1. Contributing Authors
    5. Introduction
      1. Why Did I Write this Book
      2. What Does the Title Mean
      3. Who Should Read This Book
      4. How to Read This Book
      5. What You Will Learn
      6. What You Need
      7. How to Contact the Author
    6. 1. What Kind of Protection Do You Need?
      1. 1.1. In the Beginning, There Were Disk and Tape
      2. 1.2. Overview of Availability Mechanisms
        1. 1.2.1. Storage Availability
          1. 1.2.1.1. Introducing RAID
          2. 1.2.1.2. Decision Question: Is It Really Mission Critical?
          3. 1.2.1.3. Synchronous vs. Asynchronous
        2. 1.2.2. Asynchronous Replication
        3. 1.2.3. Clustering
        4. 1.2.4. Application Built-in Availability
          1. 1.2.4.1. File Services' Distributed File Services (DFS)
          2. 1.2.4.2. SQL Server Mirroring
          3. 1.2.4.3. Exchange Replication
        5. 1.2.5. Decision Question: How Asynchronous?
      3. 1.3. Overview of Protection Mechanisms
        1. 1.3.1. Let's Talk Tape
        2. 1.3.2. Disk vs. Tape
        3. 1.3.3. Microsoft Improvements for Windows Backups
      4. 1.4. Summary
    7. 2. Data Protection by the Numbers
      1. 2.1. The Technical Metrics: RPO and RTO
        1. 2.1.1. Recovery Point Objective
        2. 2.1.2. Recovery Time Objective
        3. 2.1.3. Putting RPO and RTO Together
        4. 2.1.4. Making RPO and RTO Real with SLAs
      2. 2.2. Business Metrics: RA and BIA
        1. 2.2.1. Risk Analysis (RA): The Science of Worrying
          1. 2.2.1.1. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
          2. 2.2.1.2. How Likely Is It?
        2. 2.2.2. Business Impact Analysis (BIA): How Much Will It Cost?
          1. 2.2.2.1. Always Turn Technologies into Dollars
          2. 2.2.2.2. Calculating the Cost of Downtime
          3. 2.2.2.3. The Cost of Downtime for Nightly Backup for a Small Office
          4. 2.2.2.4. The Cost of Downtime for Nightly Backup for a Bigger Office
          5. 2.2.2.5. Adapting the Formula to Your Business
      3. 2.3. Risk Mitigation: Fixing It in Advance
        1. 2.3.1. Protection or Productivity?
        2. 2.3.2. Availability
        3. 2.3.3. Protection
      4. 2.4. Total Cost of Ownership
      5. 2.5. Return on Investment
        1. 2.5.1. Calculating ROI
        2. 2.5.2. Which ROI Method Is Most Accurate?
        3. 2.5.3. The Credibility Challenge of ROI
      6. 2.6. Turning IT Needs into Corporate Initiatives
      7. 2.7. Summary
    8. 3. The Layers of Data Protection
      1. 3.1. What Data Looks Like from the Server's Perspective
      2. 3.2. Hardware-centric Protection
        1. 3.2.1. Storage Level 1: Protecting Against Spindle Failure
          1. 3.2.1.1. RAID 0: Striping
          2. 3.2.1.2. RAID 1: Mirroring or Duplexing
          3. 3.2.1.3. RAID 2, 3, and 4
          4. 3.2.1.4. RAID 5
          5. 3.2.1.5. RAID 6
          6. 3.2.1.6. Hot Spare, or Hot Standby, Disk
          7. 3.2.1.7. RAID 0+1, 1+0, and 10
          8. 3.2.1.8. RAID 50
          9. 3.2.1.9. Concurrent Drive Failures
          10. 3.2.1.10. Choosing a RAID Level
          11. 3.2.1.11. Slicing Arrays into LUNs
        2. 3.2.2. Storage Level 2: Protecting Against Array Failure
        3. 3.2.3. Storage Level 3: Protecting Against Storage Node Failure
        4. 3.2.4. Storage Level 4: Protecting Against SAN Fabric Failure
        5. 3.2.5. How Disk-Based Communication Works
        6. 3.2.6. Synchronous Replication in Storage
          1. 3.2.6.1. Host-Based Storage Mirroring
          2. 3.2.6.2. Array-Based Storage Mirroring
          3. 3.2.6.3. Data Movement Through a Server
      3. 3.3. File-centric Protection
        1. 3.3.1. Application-Agnostic Replication
        2. 3.3.2. How Application-Agnostic Replication Works
          1. 3.3.2.1. File System Filter Modes
          2. 3.3.2.2. Network Queuing Modes
          3. 3.3.2.3. Applying the I/OS on the Target
        3. 3.3.3. Protection and Availability
          1. 3.3.3.1. Identity Spoofing
          2. 3.3.3.2. File Share Resumption
          3. 3.3.3.3. Application Service Resumption
        4. 3.3.4. When to Use Application-Agnostic Availability
      4. 3.4. Application-centric Protection
      5. 3.5. Where to Store Your Protected Data
        1. 3.5.1. Tape-Based Protection
        2. 3.5.2. Disk-Based Protection
          1. 3.5.2.1. Backup Behavior
          2. 3.5.2.2. Recovery Behavior
          3. 3.5.2.3. How Disk-Based Backup Works Today
        3. 3.5.3. Cloud-Based Protection
          1. 3.5.3.1. What Is Your Provider's Long-Term Credibility?
          2. 3.5.3.2. What Are Your Retention Requirements and Budget?
          3. 3.5.3.3. What Are Your Anticipated Recovery Scenarios?
        4. 3.5.4. Use Each Media Type for What It Does Best
      6. 3.6. Summary
    9. 4. Better Backups
      1. 4.1. Solving the Problem from the Inside Out
        1. 4.1.1. Supportability and Reliability in Legacy Backup Solutions
        2. 4.1.2. How Microsoft Addressed the Issue
      2. 4.2. Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS)
        1. 4.2.1. VSS Writer
        2. 4.2.2. VSS Requestor
        3. 4.2.3. VSS Provider
        4. 4.2.4. How VSS Backups Work
          1. 4.2.4.1. Before the Backup
          2. 4.2.4.2. Phase 1: The VSS Requestor Requests a Backup
          3. 4.2.4.3. Phase 2: The VSS Writer Ensures Data Consistency
          4. 4.2.4.4. Phase 3: The Backup Itself
          5. 4.2.4.5. The Power of Copy on Write
      3. 4.3. The Windows Server Backup Utility
        1. 4.3.1. Getting Started with WSB
        2. 4.3.2. Restoring with WSB
      4. 4.4. System Center Data Protection Manager
        1. 4.4.1. Why Did Microsoft Build a Backup Product?
          1. 4.4.1.1. Supportability
          2. 4.4.1.2. Protection of New Applications and Servers
          3. 4.4.1.3. Heterogeneity in Backup Mechanisms
        2. 4.4.2. How Does DPM Work?
          1. 4.4.2.1. How the DPM Agent Works
          2. 4.4.2.2. How DPM Storage Works
          3. 4.4.2.3. DPM Express Full Backups
          4. 4.4.2.4. DPM Transactional Log Replication
        3. 4.4.3. Getting Started with DPM 2010
          1. 4.4.3.1. Task 1: Installing the DPM Server
          2. 4.4.3.2. Introducing the DPM Administrator Console
          3. 4.4.3.3. Task 2: Configuring the DPM Disk and Tape
          4. 4.4.3.4. Task 3: Installing DPM Agents onto the Production Servers
        4. 4.4.4. Configuring DPM 2010 Protection
          1. 4.4.4.1. Task 4: Server Data Protection
          2. 4.4.4.2. System State and Bare Metal Recovery
          3. 4.4.4.3. Virtual Machine and Host Protection
          4. 4.4.4.4. Task 5: Client Protection
        5. 4.4.5. Restoring Data with DPM 2010
          1. 4.4.5.1. How the DPM Storage Pool Restores Data
          2. 4.4.5.2. Overview of the DPM Restoration Process
          3. 4.4.5.3. Task 6: Restoring Files
          4. 4.4.5.4. Task 7: Enabling End-User Recovery of Files
          5. 4.4.5.5. How DPM Restores Transactional Data
          6. 4.4.5.6. Task 8: Restoring Exchange Mail
          7. 4.4.5.7. The Coolest Restore Time Is "Latest"
          8. 4.4.5.8. Task 9: Restoring SQL Databases
          9. 4.4.5.9. Task 10: Restoring SharePoint Items
          10. 4.4.5.10. Task 11: Restoring Virtual Machines
          11. 4.4.5.11. Task 12: Restoring Data on Client Workstations
        6. 4.4.6. Using DPM 2010 in Heterogeneous Environments
          1. 4.4.6.1. What Is an Offline Backup?
          2. 4.4.6.2. Backing Up the DPM Server to Third-Party Tape
        7. 4.4.7. Disaster Recovery with DPM 2010
          1. 4.4.7.1. DPM 2 DPM 4 DR
          2. 4.4.7.2. Using CloudRecovery for DPM
          3. 4.4.7.3. Task 13: Configuring Secondary Replication for Disaster Recovery
      5. 4.5. Summary
    10. 5. File Services
      1. 5.1. File System Availability and Protection in Windows Server
      2. 5.2. What Is the Distributed File System?
        1. 5.2.1. Distributed File System Namespace
        2. 5.2.2. Distributed File System Replication
        3. 5.2.3. DFS Terminology
      3. 5.3. Enabling DFS on Your Windows File Servers
        1. 5.3.1. Infrastructure Prerequisites
        2. 5.3.2. Installing DFS on Windows Server 2003 and 2003 R2
        3. 5.3.3. Installing DFS on Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2
      4. 5.4. Getting Started with DFS-N
        1. 5.4.1. How a DFS Namespace Works
          1. 5.4.1.1. DFS Namespaces: Domain-Based or Standalone
          2. 5.4.1.2. DFS Namespace: How the Referral Works
          3. 5.4.1.3. DFS Namespace: Target Priority
        2. 5.4.2. Configuring a DFS Namespace
          1. 5.4.2.1. DFS Namespace Task 1: Create Your Namespace
          2. 5.4.2.2. DFS Namespace Task 2: Adding a Second Namespace Server for Redundancy
          3. 5.4.2.3. DFS Namespace Task 3: Delegation of Management (Optional)
          4. 5.4.2.4. DFS Namespace Task 4: Adding Folders and Hierarchy
          5. 5.4.2.5. DFS Namespace Task 5: Target Referral Ordering (Optional)
      5. 5.5. Getting Started with DFS-R
        1. 5.5.1. Before DFS-R, There Was FRS
        2. 5.5.2. Key Concepts in DFS Replication
        3. 5.5.3. How DFS-R Works: Remote Differential Compression
          1. 5.5.3.1. How RDC Parses for Changes
          2. 5.5.3.2. Cross-File RDC
        4. 5.5.4. How Initial Replication Works
        5. 5.5.5. Configuring DFS Replication
          1. 5.5.5.1. DFS Replication Task 1: Creating a Replication Group
          2. 5.5.5.2. DFS Replication Task 2: Adding Redundancy to a Folder Target
          3. 5.5.5.3. DFS Replication Task 3: Publishing the New Copy of the Replicated Folder in the Namespace
        6. 5.5.6. DFS Replication Options
          1. 5.5.6.1. DFS Replication: Bandwidth Throttling
          2. 5.5.6.2. DFS Replication: Recovery of Replication and Members
          3. 5.5.6.3. DFS Replication: Prestaging the Data
          4. 5.5.6.4. DFS Replication Metrics
      6. 5.6. Mixing DFS-R and DFS-N for Real-World Solutions
        1. 5.6.1. File Distribution
        2. 5.6.2. Branch Office Availability and Centralized Backup
          1. 5.6.2.1. Centralized Backup via DFS-R
          2. 5.6.2.2. Branch File Share Availability
          3. 5.6.2.3. Branch File Share High Availability with DFS-N
        3. 5.6.3. Collaboration Between Branches
        4. 5.6.4. Migration and Growth
      7. 5.7. DFS Enhancements in Windows Server 2008 R2
      8. 5.8. Summary
    11. 6. Windows Clustering
      1. 6.1. Overview of Clustering in Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2
        1. 6.1.1. Scale Out with Network Load Balancing
        2. 6.1.2. Scale Up with Failover Clustering
        3. 6.1.3. Failover Clustering Terms and Concepts
        4. 6.1.4. The Anatomy of a Failover Cluster
      2. 6.2. Building Your First Cluster
        1. 6.2.1. Start with Shared Storage
          1. 6.2.1.1. iSCSI Pre-Setup Task 1: Enable the iSCSI Initiator on Your Nodes
          2. 6.2.1.2. iSCSI Pre-setup Task 2: Create an iSCSI LUN in WSS08
          3. 6.2.1.3. iSCSI Pre-setup Task 3: Connect Your Cluster Nodes to the SAN
        2. 6.2.2. Creating Your Virtual Hands-on Environment
          1. 6.2.2.1. Pre-setup Task 4: Creating Three Networks Between the Nodes
          2. 6.2.2.2. Pre-setup Task 5: Creating Three Nodes for Our Cluster
        3. 6.2.3. Getting Started with MSCS in Windows Server 2008
          1. 6.2.3.1. Cluster A, Task 1: Installing MSCS in Windows Server 2008
          2. 6.2.3.2. Cluster A, Task 2: Prevalidating the Cluster Nodes in Windows Server 2008
          3. 6.2.3.3. Cluster A, Task 3: Creating the Cluster in Windows Server 2008
          4. 6.2.3.4. The Failover Cluster Management Console
            1. 6.2.3.4.1. Cluster Networking
            2. 6.2.3.4.2. Cluster Storage
            3. 6.2.3.4.3. Cluster Nodes
          5. 6.2.3.5. Cluster A, Task 4: Create a Highly Available File Server
          6. 6.2.3.6. Cluster A, Task 5: Test It from a Windows Client
      3. 6.3. How Failover Clustering Works
        1. 6.3.1. The Cluster Heartbeat
        2. 6.3.2. When Failover Occurs
      4. 6.4. Quorum Models
        1. 6.4.1. Witness Disk (Only)
        2. 6.4.2. Node and Disk Majority
        3. 6.4.3. Node and File Share Majority
        4. 6.4.4. Node Majority
        5. 6.4.5. What Changes with the Third Node and Beyond
          1. 6.4.5.1. Cluster A, Task 6: Adding an Additional Node
          2. 6.4.5.2. Cluster A, Task 7: Changing the Quorum Type
      5. 6.5. Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Clustering
        1. 6.5.1. What's New in Failover Clustering (Windows Server 2008 R2)
        2. 6.5.2. Building Your Second Cluster Using Windows Server 2008 R2 in Hyper-V
          1. 6.5.2.1. Cluster B, Task 1: Preparing Windows Server 2008 R2 Nodes
          2. 6.5.2.2. Cluster B, Task 2: Enabling Clustering in Windows Server 2008 R2
        3. 6.5.3. Migrating to Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Clusters
          1. 6.5.3.1. Optional Task: Building a Windows Server 2003 R2 Cluster Using Virtual Server 2005 R2
            1. 6.5.3.1.1. Running Virtual Server 2005 R2 on Windows Server 2008
            2. 6.5.3.1.2. Creating a Shared Storage Volume Within Virtual Server
            3. 6.5.3.1.3. Creating a Windows Server 2003 Cluster
          2. 6.5.3.2. Step 1: Evict Node 2 from Your Existing Cluster
          3. 6.5.3.3. Step 2: Build a Single-Node Cluster out of Node2
          4. 6.5.3.4. Step 3: Migrate the Cluster Configuration
          5. 6.5.3.5. Step 4: Move the Data
          6. 6.5.3.6. Step 5: Decommission Node 1
          7. 6.5.3.7. Considerations That Make Migrations Easier
      6. 6.6. Summary
    12. 7. Microsoft Exchange
      1. 7.1. Exchange within Microsoft Cluster Services
        1. 7.1.1. Single Copy Clusters
        2. 7.1.2. Getting Started with SCCs
        3. 7.1.3. Failover Behavior
          1. 7.1.3.1. Planned Switchovers with Clustered Exchange
          2. 7.1.3.2. Unplanned Failovers with Clustered Exchange
        4. 7.1.4. Challenges with SCC
          1. 7.1.4.1. Failover Challenges with SCC
          2. 7.1.4.2. Storage Challenges with SCC
          3. 7.1.4.3. Location Challenges with SCC
          4. 7.1.4.4. Single-Copy Limitations of SCC
      2. 7.2. Exchange 2007 Continuous Replication
        1. 7.2.1. How Does Continuous Replication Work?
        2. 7.2.2. Seeding a Database
        3. 7.2.3. Local Continuous Replication (LCR)
          1. 7.2.3.1. How LCR Works
          2. 7.2.3.2. Task 1: Getting Started with LCR
        4. 7.2.4. Cluster Continuous Replication
          1. 7.2.4.1. How CCR Works
          2. 7.2.4.2. Task 2: Preparing to Install CCR into a Windows Server 2008 Cluster
          3. 7.2.4.3. Task 3: Building the Windows Failover Cluster
          4. 7.2.4.4. Task 4: Installing CCR onto Windows Server 2008 Cluster Node 1
          5. 7.2.4.5. Task 5: Installing CCR onto Windows Server 2008 Cluster Node 2
          6. 7.2.4.6. Data Protection and Backup Considerations with CCR
          7. 7.2.4.7. When and How to Truncate Logs after the Backup
        5. 7.2.5. Standby Continuous Replication
          1. 7.2.5.1. How SCR Works
          2. 7.2.5.2. Task 6: Getting Started with SCR
          3. 7.2.5.3. Task 7: Preparing the SCR Server for Recovery
          4. 7.2.5.4. Task 8: Activating the SCR Copy
          5. 7.2.5.5. Backup Considerations with SCR
      3. 7.3. Exchange 2010 Database Availability
        1. 7.3.1. Database Availability Group
          1. 7.3.1.1. What Is a DAG?
          2. 7.3.1.2. DAG Active Manager
          3. 7.3.1.3. DAG Databases
          4. 7.3.1.4. DAG Replication
          5. 7.3.1.5. DAG Initial Seeding
          6. 7.3.1.6. DAG Failover
          7. 7.3.1.7. DAG Failback or Resync
        2. 7.3.2. Getting Started with DAG
          1. 7.3.2.1. Task 9: Preparing the Servers for Exchange 2010 and DAG
          2. 7.3.2.2. Task 10: Creating the DAG
          3. 7.3.2.3. Task 11: Adding Member Servers to the DAG
          4. 7.3.2.4. Task 12: Replicating Databases in the DAG
          5. 7.3.2.5. Task 13: Switchovers in DAG
        3. 7.3.3. Data Protection Considerations with DAG
      4. 7.4. Summary
    13. 8. Microsoft SQL Server
      1. 8.1. SQL Server Built-in Resiliency
        1. 8.1.1. SQL Terminology
        2. 8.1.2. Clustering or Mirroring?
      2. 8.2. SQL Failover Clustering
        1. 8.2.1. Preparing to Cluster SQL Server
        2. 8.2.2. Task 1: Installing SQL Server onto the First Clustered Node
        3. 8.2.3. Task 2: Installing SQL Server onto the Second Clustered Node
        4. 8.2.4. What Happens When a Database Changes Nodes?
        5. 8.2.5. Should You Cluster SQL Server?
      3. 8.3. SQL Database Mirroring
        1. 8.3.1. Starting the Mirror Session
        2. 8.3.2. How Mirroring Works
          1. 8.3.2.1. Synchronous Mirroring for High Safety
          2. 8.3.2.2. Asynchronous Mirroring for High Performance
          3. 8.3.2.3. Page-Level Self-Healing
          4. 8.3.2.4. Configuring Endpoints for Database Mirroring
        3. 8.3.3. Task 3: Preparing the Database Mirror
          1. 8.3.3.1. Backing Up the Principal Database Using the UI
          2. 8.3.3.2. Backing Up the Database and Log Using Transact-SQL
          3. 8.3.3.3. Creating the Mirror Database
          4. 8.3.3.4. Restoring the Principal Database into the Mirror Using the UI
          5. 8.3.3.5. Restoring the Principal Database into the Mirror Using SQL
        4. 8.3.4. Task 4: Getting Started with Database Mirroring
      4. 8.4. SQL Database Failover
        1. 8.4.1. Can I Get a Witness?
        2. 8.4.2. Task 5: Adding a Witness to the Mirroring Configuration
        3. 8.4.3. SQL Quorum
        4. 8.4.4. Automatic Failover
        5. 8.4.5. Manual Failover
          1. 8.4.5.1. Manually Failing Over a Database
          2. 8.4.5.2. Using Failover as Part of a Rolling Server Upgrade
        6. 8.4.6. Other Recovery Methods
        7. 8.4.7. Forcing Service
          1. 8.4.7.1. Why Could Data be Lost?
          2. 8.4.7.2. Forcing Service with Data Loss
        8. 8.4.8. Client Connectivity
      5. 8.5. SQL Log Shipping and Replication
        1. 8.5.1. Introducing SQL Log Shipping
        2. 8.5.2. Task 6: Getting Started with SQL Log Shipping
        3. 8.5.3. Introducing SQL Replication
      6. 8.6. Which SQL Server HA Solution Should You Choose?
      7. 8.7. Backing Up SQL Server
        1. 8.7.1. The Most Important Rule in Backing Up SQL Server
        2. 8.7.2. The Other Most Important Rule in SQL Server Backups
        3. 8.7.3. Restoring Databases with DPM 2010
          1. 8.7.3.1. Configuring Self-Service Restores in DPM Console
          2. 8.7.3.2. Installing the SQL SSR Utility
          3. 8.7.3.3. Restoring Your Own Database
      8. 8.8. Summary
    14. 9. Virtualization
      1. 9.1. Virtualization Changes Everything
      2. 9.2. Protecting Virtual Machines
        1. 9.2.1. Challenges in Virtual Machine Protection
        2. 9.2.2. VSS-Based Backups of Virtual Machines
          1. 9.2.2.1. Protecting VSS-Capable Virtual Machines
          2. 9.2.2.2. Protecting Non-VSS-Capable Virtual Machines
        3. 9.2.3. Host-Based vs. Guest-Based Backups
          1. 9.2.3.1. Benefit: Deployment and Manageability
          2. 9.2.3.2. Benefit: Heterogeneous Backups
          3. 9.2.3.3. Benefit: Whole Server Recovery
          4. 9.2.3.4. Challenge: Whole-Server Recovery
          5. 9.2.3.5. Challenge: Whole-Server Protection
          6. 9.2.3.6. Challenge: iSCSI Storage Within Guest OSs
          7. 9.2.3.7. Guidance: Deciding Whether to Protect from Guest or Host
        4. 9.2.4. Restoring Virtual Machines
          1. 9.2.4.1. Whole-VM Recovery
          2. 9.2.4.2. Single-VHD Recovery
          3. 9.2.4.3. Item-Level Recovery
      3. 9.3. Availability of Virtual Machines
        1. 9.3.1. How Live Migration Works
        2. 9.3.2. Defining Clustered Shared Volumes
        3. 9.3.3. Requirements for LM and CSV
        4. 9.3.4. Getting Started with CSV
          1. 9.3.4.1. Task 1: Building the Cluster Nodes
          2. 9.3.4.2. Task 2: Creating a Cluster
          3. 9.3.4.3. Task 3: Enabling and Creating CSVs
          4. 9.3.4.4. Task 4: Creating the Virtual Machines
          5. 9.3.4.5. Task 5: Making Your VMs Highly Available
        5. 9.3.5. Backing Up CSV Configurations
      4. 9.4. How Virtualization Makes Data Protection and Availability Better
      5. 9.5. Disaster Recovery Staging
        1. 9.5.1. Legacy Options for Physical BC/DR sites
          1. 9.5.1.1. Legacy Option 1: Physical One-to-One (1:1) Replication
          2. 9.5.1.2. Legacy Option 2: Physical Many-to-One (M:1) Replication with Total Failover
          3. 9.5.1.3. Legacy Option 3: Physical Many-to-One Replication with Partial Failover
          4. 9.5.1.4. Potential Option 4: Application-Specific Replication with Failover
        2. 9.5.2. Using Virtualization for Physical Server Business Continuity
          1. 9.5.2.1. Physical-to-Virtual (P2V) Utilities
          2. 9.5.2.2. Protecting the Physical Servers' Data
          3. 9.5.2.3. Bringing the Virtual Machines Online
          4. 9.5.2.4. Recovering Back to the Original Site
          5. 9.5.2.5. Failing Over Less than a Whole Site
        3. 9.5.3. Using Virtualization for Virtual Server Business Continuity
      6. 9.6. Bare Metal Recovery
      7. 9.7. Server Rollback
        1. 9.7.1.
          1. 9.7.1.1. Hypervisor VM Rollback
          2. 9.7.1.2. Reverting a VM Using Backups and Restores
      8. 9.8. Summary
    15. 10. Management and Deployment
      1. 10.1. Well-Managed Systems for Higher Uptime
      2. 10.2. Large Enterprise Deployment and Manageability
        1. 10.2.1. Introducing Microsoft Systems Management
        2. 10.2.2. System Center Configuration Manager 2007 R2 and R3
        3. 10.2.3. Configuration Manager Site System Roles
        4. 10.2.4. The Configuration Manager Console
        5. 10.2.5. Asset Identification and Agent Installation
          1. 10.2.5.1. Installing the Configuration Manager Agent
          2. 10.2.5.2. Task 1: Enabling Asset Intelligence
        6. 10.2.6. Centralized Software Deployment
          1. 10.2.6.1. Task 2: Creating a Package from a Definition File (MSI File Based)
          2. 10.2.6.2. Task 3: Viewing the Programs Created from Importing a Definition File (MSI File Based)
          3. 10.2.6.3. Task 4: Distributing the Package Source Files to a Distribution Point
          4. 10.2.6.4. Task 5: Creating an Advertisement
          5. 10.2.6.5. Task 6: Forcing the Client to Check for Policies More Quickly
          6. 10.2.6.6. Task 7: Running an Optional Advertised Program
          7. 10.2.6.7. Task 8: Validating Advertisement Success
        7. 10.2.7. Securing Resources with Software Update Management
          1. 10.2.7.1. Task 9: Forcing Software Update Point Synchronization
          2. 10.2.7.2. Task 10: Forcing Software Update Scan by a Client
          3. 10.2.7.3. Task 11: Viewing Software Update Compliance
          4. 10.2.7.4. Task 12: Deploying Required Software Updates
        8. 10.2.8. Identifying Desired State Compliance
          1. 10.2.8.1. Task 13: Creating an Application Configuration Item
          2. 10.2.8.2. Task 14: Creating a Configuration Baseline
          3. 10.2.8.3. Task 15: Assigning the Configuration Baseline to a Collection
          4. 10.2.8.4. Task 16: Validating Configuration Baseline Compliance
        9. 10.2.9. Deploying Operating Systems
          1. 10.2.9.1. Task 17: Distributing the Boot Image to a Distribution Point
          2. 10.2.9.2. Task 18: Importing an Operating System Image
          3. 10.2.9.3. Task 19: Creating a Task Sequence for Deploying an Operating System Image
          4. 10.2.9.4. Task 20: Advertising the Task Sequence
        10. 10.2.10. Preventing Unsecure System Access
          1. 10.2.10.1. Task 21: Deploying NAP-Enabled Software Updates
      3. 10.3. Virtualization Management
        1. 10.3.1. Overview of VMM 2008 R2
          1. 10.3.1.1. VMM Management Interfaces
          2. 10.3.1.2. VMM Database
          3. 10.3.1.3. Hosts Managed by VMM
        2. 10.3.2. Key Features of VMM 2008 R2
          1. 10.3.2.1. Physical-to-Virtual (P2V) Migration
          2. 10.3.2.2. Virtual-to-Virtual (V2V) Migration
          3. 10.3.2.3. Hyper-V R2 Live Migration
        3. 10.3.3. Intelligent Placement for VMs
        4. 10.3.4. Integration with Operations Manager
          1. 10.3.4.1. Task 22: Deploying the VMM Agent
          2. 10.3.4.2. Task 23: Physical-to-Virtual Migration
          3. 10.3.4.3. Task 24: Understanding New Virtual Machine Provisioning
      4. 10.4. Midsized Management: Physical and Virtual
        1. 10.4.1. Introducing SCE 2010
        2. 10.4.2. Getting Started with SCE 2010
          1. 10.4.2.1. Task 25: Taking Inventory of Assets with SCE
          2. 10.4.2.2. Task 26: Patching PCs with SCE Software Updates
          3. 10.4.2.3. Task 27: Deploying Software with SCE
          4. 10.4.2.4. Building a Software Package
          5. 10.4.2.5. Approving Packages for Deployment
          6. 10.4.2.6. Task 28: Performing SCE Virtualization Tasks
          7. 10.4.2.7. Designating a New Virtualization Host
          8. 10.4.2.8. Physical-to-Virtual Migration
          9. 10.4.2.9. Creating a New VM from a Template
      5. 10.5. Summary
    16. 11. Monitoring Systems
      1. 11.1. The Need for Monitoring
      2. 11.2. Challenges in Monitoring
      3. 11.3. Enterprise End-to-End Monitoring
        1. 11.3.1. Introducing Operations Manager 2007 R2
          1. 11.3.1.1. Operations Manager Architecture
          2. 11.3.1.2. User Roles in Operations Manager
        2. 11.3.2. Getting Started with Operations Manager
          1. 11.3.2.1. Discovering Systems to Monitor
          2. 11.3.2.2. Importing Monitoring Knowledge
          3. 11.3.2.3. Changing the Default Monitoring Settings
          4. 11.3.2.4. Creating New Monitors
          5. 11.3.2.5. Creating Your Own Distributed Application Diagrams
      4. 11.4. Monitoring the Health and Performance of Key Workloads
        1. 11.4.1. Monitoring Data Protection Manager
          1. 11.4.1.1. Monitoring the DPM Server
          2. 11.4.1.2. Monitoring Data Protection Activities
        2. 11.4.2. Monitoring Distributed File Services
          1. 11.4.2.1. Monitoring DFS Namespaces
          2. 11.4.2.2. Monitoring DFS Replication
        3. 11.4.3. Monitoring Windows Failover Clustering
        4. 11.4.4. Monitoring Exchange Replication
        5. 11.4.5. Monitoring SQL Mirroring
        6. 11.4.6. Monitoring Virtualization
          1. 11.4.6.1. Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2
          2. 11.4.6.2. Hyper-V Host Role
      5. 11.5. Monitoring in Midsized Organizations Using System Center Essentials
        1. 11.5.1. Introducing SC Essentials 2010
        2. 11.5.2. Discovering Midsized Resources
        3. 11.5.3. Monitoring Midsized Environments
        4. 11.5.4. Knowledge Applied to Midsized Scenarios
        5. 11.5.5. Virtualization Monitoring in Midsized Datacenters
      6. 11.6. Summary
    17. 12. Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
      1. 12.1. What Makes BC and DR So Special?
        1. 12.1.1. Real Business Continuity Planning
        2. 12.1.2. Regulatory Compliance
          1. 12.1.2.1. Regulations That Everyone Points to but Nobody Knows
          2. 12.1.2.2. The E-SIGN Law
          3. 12.1.2.3. CO-OP, the Government's Continuous Operations Mandate
          4. 12.1.2.4. DoD 5015.2-STD for Federal Agencies and Contractors
          5. 12.1.2.5. US Food and Drug Administration: 21 CFR 11
          6. 12.1.2.6. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
          7. 12.1.2.7. The Joint Commission, formerly JCAHO
          8. 12.1.2.8. SEC, NYSE, and NASD
          9. 12.1.2.9. SEC and US Treasury Guidance (Post-9/11)
          10. 12.1.2.10. Gramm-Leach-Bliley for Financial Institutions
          11. 12.1.2.11. Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX)
        3. 12.1.3. The Real Reason to Do Disaster Recovery
      2. 12.2. Get Your Data Out of the Building
        1. 12.2.1. Don't Cry "I Wasn't Ready Yet"
        2. 12.2.2. Tactical DR vs. Strategic Disaster Preparedness
      3. 12.3. BC = DR + HA
        1. 12.3.1. Multiple Datacenters
          1. 12.3.1.1. Application Resiliency Across Sites
          2. 12.3.1.2. Better Backups That Are Always Offsite
          3. 12.3.1.3. What Is the Downside?
        2. 12.3.2. Branch Offices' BCDR
          1. 12.3.2.1. Desktop and Laptop Data
          2. 12.3.2.2. Branch Office File Servers
          3. 12.3.2.3. Databases
          4. 12.3.2.4. What Is the Downside?
        3. 12.3.3. Branch Offices for DR
        4. 12.3.4. Hosted Providers
        5. 12.3.5. Service Providers
          1. 12.3.5.1. Local Channel Resellers
          2. 12.3.5.2. Data Vaulting Providers
          3. 12.3.5.3. Hybrid On-Premise and Vault/Cloud Providers
      4. 12.4. BC/DR Solution Alternatives
        1. 12.4.1. Application- or Workload-Specific Features
        2. 12.4.2. Application-Agnostic Replication and Failover
      5. 12.5. Using Virtualization to Achieve Business Continuity
        1. 12.5.1. Challenges with Traditional Disaster Recovery Staging
        2. 12.5.2. Disaster Recovery Staging, Virtually
          1. 12.5.2.1. Protecting the Whole Production Server
          2. 12.5.2.2. Using VMM to Protect the Operating System and Applications
          3. 12.5.2.3. Using DPM to Protect the Data
          4. 12.5.2.4. Planning for Long-Term Server Restoration
        3. 12.5.3. Restoring Your Infrastructure within Hyper-V
          1. 12.5.3.1. Using VMM to Bring Servers Online
          2. 12.5.3.2. Using DPM to Restore Data
          3. 12.5.3.3. Making the Process Even Better
        4. 12.5.4. Additional Notes on Virtualized BC/DR Sites
      6. 12.6. Planning for BC/DR to Get Better Backups and Availability
      7. 12.7. Summary
        1. 12.7.1. Where BC/DR is today
        2. 12.7.2. Where BC/DR is heading
    18. A. Links and Resources
      1. A.1. Microsoft Software
      2. A.2. Topical Resources
        1. A.2.1. Chapter 4: Data Protection Manager
        2. A.2.2. Chapters 4, 5, and 6: Windows Server
          1. A.2.2.1. Volume Shadow Copy Services
          2. A.2.2.2. File Services
          3. A.2.2.3. Distributed File System
          4. A.2.2.4. Windows Failover Clustering
        3. A.2.3. Chapter 7: Exchange
        4. A.2.4. Chapter 8: SQL Server
        5. A.2.5. Chapter 9: Virtualization
        6. A.2.6. Chapters 10 and 11: System Center
        7. A.2.7. Chapter 12: BC and DR
      3. A.3. The Author