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Data Model Patterns

Book Description

This is  the digital version of the printed book (Copyright © 1996).

Learning the basics of a modeling technique is not the same as learning how to use and apply it. To develop a data model of an organization is to gain insights into its nature that do not come easily. Indeed, analysts are often expected to understand subtleties of an organization's structure that may have evaded people who have worked there for years.

Here's help for those analysts who have learned the basics of data modeling (or "entity/relationship modeling") but who need to obtain the insights required to prepare a good model of a real business.

Structures common to many types of business are analyzed in areas such as accounting, material requirements planning, process manufacturing, contracts, laboratories, and documents.

In each chapter, high-level data models are drawn from the following business areas:

  • The Enterprise and Its World

  • The Things of the Enterprise

  • Procedures and Activities

  • Contracts

  • Accounting

  • The Laboratory

  • Material Requirements Planning

  • Process Manufacturing

  • Documents

  • Lower-Level Conventions

Table of Contents

  1. About This eBook
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Also Available from Dorset House Publishing Co.
  5. Dedication
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Contents
  8. Figures and Tables
  9. Foreword
  10. Preface
  11. 1. Introduction
    1. Data Modeling’s Promise—and Failure
    2. About Modeling Conventions
    3. These Models and Your Organization
    4. Who Should Read this Book?
  12. 2. Data Modeling Conventions
    1. Syntactic Conventions
    2. Positional Conventions
    3. Semantic Conventions
    4. References
  13. 3. The Enterprise and Its World
    1. Parties
    2. Employee Assignments
    3. Organizations
    4. Addresses
    5. Geographic Locations
    6. Reporting Relationships
    7. About Types
    8. About Points of View
    9. In Summary
  14. 4. Things of the Enterprise
    1. Products and Product Types
    2. Inventory
    3. Structure
    4. Heterogeneous Entities
    5. A Variation
    6. References
  15. 5. Procedures and Activities
    1. Some Definitions
    2. Dividing Activities
    3. Work Orders
    4. Labor Usage
    5. Actual Asset Usage
    6. Kinds of Work Orders
    7. In Summary
  16. 6. Contracts
    1. Purchase Orders and Sales Orders
    2. User Specifications
    3. Contract Roles
    4. Employment Contracts
    5. Marketing Regions and Districts
    6. Deliveries of Products and Services
    7. Summary of Material Movements
    8. In Summary
  17. 7. Accounting
    1. Basic Bookkeeping
    2. Summarization
    3. References
  18. 8. The Laboratory
    1. Samples, Tests, and Observations
    2. Derived Observations
    3. Test Types
    4. Sample Methods
    5. Testing for Material Composition
    6. Tests as Activities
  19. 9. Material Requirements Planning
    1. Planning Finished Products
    2. Determining Component Requirements
    3. Firm Planned Orders
    4. The Manufacturing Planning Model
    5. The Planning Model
  20. 10. Process Manufacturing
    1. More about Assets
    2. Structure and Fluid Paths
    3. Flows
    4. Processes
    5. Monitoring Processes
  21. 11. Documents
    1. The Document
    2. Structure
    3. Roles
    4. Subject and Contents
    5. Versions
    6. Variable Format Forms
    7. References
  22. 12. Lower-Level Conventions
    1. Things, Thing Types, and Categories
    2. Addresses
    3. Roles
    4. Resources
    5. Relationships
    6. Variable Length Records
    7. Usually One, Sometimes Many
    8. Mathematical Expressions in the Data Model
    9. The Universal Data Model
    10. A Final Example
    11. References
  23. Bibliography
  24. Index