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Creative Composition: Digital Photography Tips & Techniques by Harold Davis

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Chapter 3. Photography and paradox

Pages 130–131:1 combined a photograph of a spiral staircase with one of a spiral shell to create a seamless composite of two very different spirals.: Stair: 18mm, 6 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted Shell: 50mm macro, 8 seconds at f/32 and ISO 100, tripod mounted

Figure 3.1. Pages 130–131:1 combined a photograph of a spiral staircase with one of a spiral shell to create a seamless composite of two very different spirals.: Stair: 18mm, 6 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted Shell: 50mm macro, 8 seconds at f/32 and ISO 100, tripod mounted

Combining Images

Every time I combine photos into a collage, I understand that my finished images must either work surrealistically or have elements of paradox... or both.

I've found that a very successful compositional technique is to blend photos with copies of themselves, reproduced at a variety of sizes and angles.

Whether compositing an image with itself or with another image, it is important to keep continuity of composition in mind.

An often overlooked point is that the color values and lighting direction of all parts of a photo composite need to match. In addition, the combination should almost always be seamless so that lines and shapes continue from one part of the composition to another without obvious breaks or discontinuities.

I shot this spiral staircase in a back area of San Francisco's Embarcadero Center.: 10.5mm digital fisheye, 10 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted

Figure 3.2. I shot this spiral staircase in a back area of San Francisco's Embarcadero Center.: 10.5mm digital fisheye, 10 seconds at f/22 and ISO 100, tripod mounted

Figure 3.3. This image is reminiscent of M, C. Escher's staircases; this ...

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