You are previewing Convergence of Mobile and Stationary Next-Generation Networks.
O'Reilly logo
Convergence of Mobile and Stationary Next-Generation Networks

Book Description

The Only Resource to Cover Wireless, Wireline, and Optical Networks in One Volume

Mobile and stationary next-generation networks that access the photonic core are destined to become as ubiquitous as traditional telephone networks. These networks must efficiently provide adequate network quality to multimedia applications with high bandwidth and strict quality-of-service requirements, as well as seamlessly integrate mobile and fixed architectures. Today's engineering students must be properly prepared to meet the challenges of next-generation network development and deployment.

Featuring contributions from top industrial experts and academic professors, this authoritative work provides a comprehensive introduction to next-generation networks. It explains wireless networks such as wireless local area networks (WLAN), wireless personal area networks (WPAN), wireless access, 3G/4G cellular, and RF transmission, as well as optical networks like long-haul and metropolitan networks, optical fiber, photonic devices, and VLSI chips. Rather than focusing on heavy math or physical details, this resource explores how the technology is being used. It describes access and transport network layer technologies while also discussing the network and services aspects.

Chapter coverage includes:

  • Fiber-wireless networks: technologies, architectures, and future challenges

  • Packet backhaul network

  • Point-to-point microwave backhaul

  • Fourth-generation broadband: paving the road to Gbit/s with copper

  • Dynamic bandwidth allocation in EPON and GPON

  • Next-generation ethernet passive optical networks: 10G-EPON

  • Power line communications and smart grids

  • Signaling for multimedia conferencing in 4G: architecture, evaluation, and issues

  • Self-coexistence and security in cognitive radio networks

  • Mobile WiMAX

  • UWB personal area networks—MIMO extensions

  • Next-generation integrated metropolitan-access network: technology integration and wireless convergence

  • Resilient burst ring: a novel technology for the next-generation metropolitan area networks

  • Filled with illustrations and practical examples from industry, this book will be invaluable to engineers and researchers in industry and academia, as well as senior undergraduate and graduate students, marketing and management staff, photonics physicists, and chip designers.

    Table of Contents

    1. Cover
    2. Title page
    3. Copyright page
    4. PREFACE
    5. CONTRIBUTORS
    6. Part I: ACCESS AND BACKHAUL NETWORKS
      1. 1 ROADMAP FOR NEXT-GENERATION COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
        1. 1.1 REQUIREMENTS FOR NGN AND THE ROLE OF QoS FOR THE FUTURE INTERNET
        2. 1.2 PROBLEMS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NGN EVOLUTION
        3. 1.3 NGN ROADMAP
      2. 2 WIDE-AREA UBIQUITOUS NETWORK: INFRASTRUCTURE FOR SENSOR AND ACTUATOR NETWORKING
        1. 2.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 2.2 TARGET APPLICATIONS AND MARKET
        3. 2.3 REQUIREMENTS, CONCEPT, AND TOTAL SYSTEM
        4. 2.4 CORE NETWORK
        5. 2.5 WIRELESS ACCESS NETWORK [35]
        6. 2.6 WIRELESS TERMINAL (WT)
        7. 2.7 APPLICATION PROGRAMMING INTERFACE (API) AND MIDDLEWARE
        8. 2.8 EXPERIMENTS [36]
        9. 2.9 CONCLUSION
      3. 3 WIRELINE ACCESS NETWORKS
        1. 3.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 3.2 COPPER-BASED ACCESS NETWORKS
        3. 3.3 PASSIVE OPTICAL NETWORKS
        4. 3.4 HYBRID FIBER COAXIAL NETWORKS
        5. 3.5 SUMMARY
      4. 4 FIBER—WIRELESS (FIWI) NETWORKS: TECHNOLOGIES, ARCHITECTURES, AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
        1. 4.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 4.2 ROF VERSUS R&F FIWI NETWORKS
        3. 4.3 ENABLING FIWI TECHNOLOGIES
        4. 4.4 FIWI ARCHITECTURES
        5. 4.5 TECHNO-ECONOMIC EVALUATION
        6. 4.6 FUTURE CHALLENGES AND IMPERATIVES
        7. 4.7 CONCLUSIONS
      5. 5 PACKET BACKHAUL NETWORK
        1. 5.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 5.2 ETHERNET BACKHAUL NETWORK
        3. 5.3 MPLS BACKHAUL NETWORK
        4. 5.4 SUMMARY
      6. 6 MICROWAVE BACKHAUL NETWORKS
        1. 6.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 6.2 MICROWAVE RADIO FUNDAMENTAL TECHNIQUES
        3. 6.3. DIFFERENT TYPES OF RADIO TECHNOLOGIES
        4. 6.4 MICROWAVE RADIO NETWORKS
        5. 6.5 MOBILE BACKHAUL EVOLUTION ALTERNATIVES
    7. Part II: WIRELINE TECHNOLOGIES
      1. 7 PAVING THE ROAD TO Gbit/s BROADBAND ACCESS WITH COPPER
        1. 7.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 7.2 HYBRID FIBER/COPPER-BASED BROADBAND ACCESS NETWORK
        3. 7.3 PHYSICAL-LAYER TECHNIQUES FOR THE LAST DROP
        4. 7.4 REGULATORY AND LEGAL ASPECTS
        5. 7.5 A THROUGHPUT PREDICTION
        6. 7.6 CONCLUSIONS
      2. 8 DYNAMIC BANDWIDTH ALLOCATION IN EPON AND GPON
        1. 8.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 8.2 STANDARDS
        3. 8.3 TRAFFIC REQUIREMENTS
        4. 8.4 PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS
        5. 8.5 DBA SCHEMES
        6. 8.5 CONCLUSIONS
      3. 9 NEXT-GENERATION ETHERNET PASSIVE OPTICAL NETWORKS: 10G-EPON
        1. 9.1 ACRONYMS
        2. 9.2 10G-EPON ARCHITECTURE
        3. 9.3 COEXISTENCE OF 1G-EPON AND 10G-EPON
        4. 9.4 TARGET APPLICATIONS FOR 10G-EPON SYSTEMS
        5. 9.5 CONCLUSIONS
        6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      4. 10 BROADBAND POWER-LINE COMMUNICATIONS
        1. 10.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 10.2 POWER-LINE SCENARIOS
        3. 10.3 ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY REGULATIONS
        4. 10.4 CHANNEL CHARACTERISTICS
        5. 10.5 NOISE CHARACTERISTICS
        6. 10.6 MEAN SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO
        7. 10.7 PLC TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
        8. 10.8 CONCLUSIONS
      5. 11 POWER-LINE COMMUNICATIONS AND SMART GRID
        1. 11.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 11.2 POWER LINE COMMUNICATIONS (PLC)
        3. 11.3 CHANNEL CHARACTERISTICS OF POWER LINES
        4. 11.4 COUPLING TECHNIQUES
        5. 11.5 STANDARDS
        6. 11.6 PRACTICAL EXAMPLE
        7. 11.7 SMART GRID SYSTEMS
        8. 11.8 CONCLUSIONS
    8. Part III: WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES AND SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT
      1. 12 SIGNALING FOR MULTIMEDIA CONFERENCING IN 4G: ARCHITECTURE, EVALUATION, AND ISSUES
        1. 12.1 BACKGROUND: 4G, MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS, AND CONFERENCING
        2. 12.2 SIGNALING FOR CONFERENCING IN 4G
        3. 12.3 OPTIMIZATION OF SIGNALING SYSTEMS: USING CROSS-LAYER DESIGN
        4. 12.4 SUMMARY
      2. 13 SELF-COEXISTENCE AND SECURITY IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS
        1. 13.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 13.2 COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORK SYSTEM OVERVIEW
        3. 13.3 CHALLENGES AND RELATED WORK
        4. 13.4 SELF-COEXISTENCE AMONG MULTIPLE CR NETWORKS
        5. 13.5 RISK OF PRIMARY USER EMULATION ATTACK
        6. 13.6 SIMULATION MODEL AND RESULTS
        7. 13.7 CONCLUSIONS
      3. 14 MOBILE WIMAX
        1. 14.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 14.2 MAC OVERVIEW
        3. 14.3 PHY OVERVIEW
        4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      4. 15 ULTRA-WIDEBAND PERSONAL AREA NETWORKS: MIMO EXTENSIONS
        1. 15.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 15.2 ULTRA-WIDEBAND COMMUNICATIONS
        3. 15.3 MULTIPLE ANTENNAS AND PRECODING FOR UWB SYSTEMS
        4. 15.4 TRANSMIT ANTENNA SELECTION
        5. 15.5 TRANSMIT BEAMFORMING IN UWB SYSTEMS
        6. 15.6 SUMMARY
        7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. Part IV: METROPOLITAN, CORE, AND STORAGE AREA NETWORKS
      1. 16 NEXT-GENERATION INTEGRATED METROPOLITAN-ACCESS NETWORK: TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION AND WIRELESS CONVERGENCE
        1. 16.1 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN METROPOLITAN AND ACCESS NETWORKS
        2. 16.2 METROPOLITAN AREA AND BROADBAND ACCESS NETWORK INTEGRATION
        3. 16.3 CONVERGENCE OF OPTICAL AND WIRELESS ACCESS NETWORK
        4. 16.4 FUTURE OUTLOOK FOR METRO-ACCESS NETWORKS
        5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      2. 17 RESILIENT BURST RING: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY FOR NEXT-GENERATION METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORKS
        1. 17.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 17.2 OVERVIEW OF THE RESILIENT BURST RING
        3. 17.3 NODE STRUCTURE OF THE RBR NETWORK
        4. 17.4 CONTROL SCHEME OF THE RBR NETWORK
        5. 17.5 QOS STRATEGY OF THE RBR NETWORK
        6. 17.6 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE RBR NETWORK
        7. 17.7 CONCLUSIONS
      3. 18 MULTIPROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING
        1. 18.1 WHY MPLS?
        2. 18.2 BASIC UNDERLYING IDEA AND OPERATING PRINCIPLES
        3. 18.3 MPLS HISTORY
        4. 18.4 PROTOCOLS AND FUNCTIONS
        5. 18.5 MPLS AND OTHER BUZZWORDS
      4. 19 OVERVIEW OF STORAGE NETWORKING AND STORAGE NETWORKS
        1. 19.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 19.2 INTRODUCTION TO STORAGE NETWORKS
        3. 19.3 STORAGE NETWORKING CONCEPTS
        4. 19.4 APPLICATIONS OF STORAGE NETWORKS
        5. 19.5 STORAGE NETWORK PROTOCOLS
        6. 19.6 NAS PROTOCOLS
        7. 19.7 VIRTUALIZATION
        8. 19.8 CONCLUSION
    10. Part V: PHOTONIC AND ELECTRONIC COMPONENT TECHNOLOGY
      1. 20 ROADM ARCHITECTURES AND WSS IMPLEMENTATION TECHNOLOGIES
        1. 20.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 20.2 NEXT-GENERATION ROADM ARCHITECTURES
        3. 20.3 WAVELENGTH-SELECTIVE SWITCHING IMPLEMENTATION TECHNOLOGIES
        4. 20.4 ROADMS IN NETWORKS
        5. 20.5 CONCLUSIONS—FUTURE TRENDS
      2. 21 INTEGRATED CIRCUITS FOR DISPERSION COMPENSATION IN OPTICAL COMMUNICATION LINKS
        1. 21.1 MOTIVATION
        2. 21.2 DISPERSION IN OPTICAL FIBERS
        3. 21.3 ELECTRONIC DISPERSION COMPENSATION (EDC) USING LINEAR EQUALIZATION
        4. 21.4 FIR FILTERS FOR EDC
        5. 21.5 IIR FILTERS FOR EDC
        6. 21.6 ELECTRONIC DISPERSION COMPENSATION USING NONLINEAR EQUALIZATION: DECISION FEEDBACK EQUALIZATION (DFE)
        7. 21.7 ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO DISPERSION COMPENSATION
        8. 21.8 CONCLUSION
      3. 22 HIGH-END SILICON PHOTODIODE INTEGRATED CIRCUITS
        1. 22.1 OPTICAL ABSORPTION OF IMPORTANT SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS
        2. 22.2 P–I–N PHOTODIODE
        3. 22.3 INTEGRATED PHOTODIODE RECEIVERS
        4. 22.4 CONCLUSION
      4. 23 MIMO WIRELESS TRANSCEIVER DESIGN INCORPORATING HYBRID ARQ
        1. 23.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 23.2 HARQ AND ITS APPLICATION TO MIMO WIRELESS SYSTEMS
        3. 23.3 TRANSMITTER IMPLEMENTATION
        4. 23.4 RECEIVER ARCHITECTURES
        5. 23.5 SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF HARQ IN MIMO WIRELESS SYSTEMS
        6. 23.6 CONCLUSION
      5. 24 RADIO-FREQUENCY TRANSCEIVERS
        1. 24.1 TRANSMITTER ARCHITECTURES
        2. 24.2 RECEIVER ARCHITECTURE
        3. 24.3 CASE STUDIES
    11. Index