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Concise Guide to DNS and BIND, The

Book Description

The Concise Guide to DNS and BIND provides you with the technical depth and expert-level information you need to understand and administer DNS and BIND. Domain Name System (DNS) is a distributed Internet directory service. It is used mainly to translate between domain names and IP addresses, and to control Internet email delivery. Most Internet services rely on DNS to work, and if DNS fails, Web sites cannot be located and email delivery stalls. BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Daemon) is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. This book covers setting up a DNS server and client, DNS domain zones, compiling and configuring BIND, dial-up connections, adding more domains, setting up root servers on private networks, firewall rules, Dynamic DNS (DDNS), subdomains and delegation, caching and name resolution, troubleshooting tools and techniques, debugging and logging, new features in BIND 8.2.2, and it offers introductory information on BIND 9.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About the Author
  3. About the Technical Editor
  4. Acknowledgments
  5. Tell Us What You Think!
  6. Introduction
  7. Basic DNS
    1. DNS Concepts
      1. DNS Is a Hierarchic, Distributed Database
      2. What Is a Domain?
      3. Zones and Delegation
      4. Reverse Zones
      5. Duplication and Distribution of Zones
      6. How Resolution Works
      7. DNS as a Tree
    2. DNS in Practice
      1. The BIND Software
      2. Configuring BIND
      3. Testing It All
      4. Resolver Setup
      5. A Zone
      6. Subdomains and Delegation
      7. Reverse Delegations for Classless Nets
      8. Secondary Servers
      9. NOTIFY
    3. Maintenance and Enhancements
      1. More Practical Details
      2. Maintaining and Changing Zones
      3. DNS Round Robin and Load Distribution
      4. The Trouble with CNAME Records
      5. Wildcard Records
      6. Logs and Debugging
      7. Adding More Domains
      8. Contingency Planning
      9. Practical Uses of Forwarding
      10. Maintaining the root.hints File
    4. Getting a Domain
      1. Top-Level Domains and Their Owners
      2. Getting the Domain
      3. Paying for Everything
  8. Advanced DNS
    1. Using Dig and nslookup
      1. Dig
      2. nslookup
    2. Troubleshooting DNS
      1. Staying Out of Trouble
      2. Network Problems
      3. Delegation Problems
      4. Reverse Lookup Problems
      5. Masters, Slaves, and Serial Numbers
      6. Caching and TTLs
      7. Zone Data Mistakes
      8. The Log File(s)
    3. The DNS Tool Chest
      1. The Internet
      2. Maintenance Tools
      3. Quality Control
    4. Security Concerns
      1. About Security
      2. How Secure Is DNS and BIND?
      3. Resource Use
      4. chroot and Least Privilege
      5. Query ID Pool
      6. Hiding Your BIND Version
      7. BIND 9 and DNSSEC
      8. DNS on Firewalls
      9. Firewall Rules and DNS
      10. Split DNS, NAT, and Network Hiding
    5. Dynamic DNS
      1. Of RRsets
      2. Of Masters and Slaves
      3. Accepting and Doing Updates
      4. Slave Server Issues
      5. Reverse Zones
      6. A One Host Zone
      7. DHCP
    6. DNS and Dial-Up Connections
      1. Moderating BIND
      2. Cutting Off BIND
    7. DNS on a Closed Network
      1. In a Simple Network
      2. Internal Rootservers
      3. Slave and Cache Servers
      4. Structuring Your DNS
    8. Interfacing DNS in Programs
      1. The UNIX Resolver
      2. DNS from Perl
      3. DNS from Python
      4. DNS in Shell Scripts
      5. Asynchronous Resolving
    9. Resource Records
      1. RRs in Current Use
      2. Experimental RRs
      3. Obsolete RRs
  9. About BIND
    1. A Guide to BIND 4
      1. Migrating from BIND 4 to BIND 8
      2. ndc in BIND 4
      3. Configuring BIND 4
      4. Miscellaneous
    2. Compiling and Maintaining BIND
      1. About BIND
      2. Getting BIND
      3. Keeping It Current
      4. Compiling BIND
      5. Installing BIND
      6. Customizing for Chrooted Environments
    3. BIND 9
      1. The Goals of BIND 9
      2. Why Use BIND 9?
      3. Compiling BIND 9
      4. The Documentation
      5. Running BIND 9
      6. New Resource Limits
      7. Views
      8. New RRs
      9. Scalability
      10. Security Enhancements
      11. IPv6 Support
    4. Miscellany
      1. How ncd Works
      2. Address Sorting
      3. Checknames, Legal Hostnames
      4. The Limits of BIND
      5. The Housekeeping of BIND
      6. The Rest of the Options
  10. Appendixes
    1. Named.Conf Man Page
      1. NAMED.CONF(5) System Programmer's Manual NAMED.CONF(5)
      2. Name
      3. named.conf—configuration file for named(8)
      4. Converting from BIND 4.9.x
      5. Address Match Lists
      6. The Logging Statement
      7. The Options Statement
      8. The Zone Statement
      9. The acl Statement
      10. The key Statement
      11. The trusted-keys Statement
      12. The server Statement
      13. The controls Statement
      14. The include Statement
      15. Examples
      16. Files
      17. See Also
    2. Bibliography
      1. Books
      2. RFCs
  11. Index