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Computation of Supersonic Flow over Flying Configurations

Book Description

This high-level aerospace reference book will be useful for undergraduate and graduate students of engineering, applied mathematics and physics. The author provides solutions for three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes layer subsonic and supersonic flows.

* Computational work and experimental results show the real-world application of computational results
* Easy computation and visualization of inviscid and viscous aerodynamic characteristics of flying configurations
* Includes a fully optimized and integrated design for a proposed supersonic transport aircraft

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Dedication
  5. Copyright
  6. About the Author
  7. Preface
  8. Acknowledgments
  9. Chapter 1: Zonal, Spectral Solutions for the Three-Dimensional, Compressible Navier–Stokes Layer
    1. 1.1. Introduction
    2. 1.2. Three-dimensional, partial-differential equations of compressible Navier-Stokes layer (NSL)
    3. 1.3. The spectral variable and the spectral forms of the velocity’s components and of the physical entities
    4. 1.4. The first and second derivatives of the velocity’s components
    5. 1.5. The implicit and explicit forms of the boundary conditions at the NSL’s edge
    6. 1.6. The dependence of the density function R versus the spectral velocity, inside the NSL
    7. 1.7. Dependence of absolute temperature T versus the spectral velocity, inside the NSL
    8. 1.8. The scalar forms of the NSL’s impulse’s partial-differential equations and their equivalent quadratical algebraic equations
    9. 1.9. Determination of spectral coefficients of the velocity’s components by solving an equivalent quadratical algebraic system, via the collocation method
    10. 1.10. An original iterative method to solve a quadratical algebraic system
    11. 1.11. Conclusions
  10. Chapter 2: Hyperbolical Potential Boundary Value Problems of the Axial Disturbance Velocities of Outer Flow, at NSL’s Edge
    1. 2.1. Introduction
    2. 2.2. Basic equations
    3. 2.3. Full-linearized partial-differential equations of the flow over flattened, flying configurations
    4. 2.4. The characteristic hypersurfaces of the partial-differential equations of second order
    5. 2.5. The linearized pressure coefficient Cp on flying configurations
    6. 2.6. The linearized boundary value problems for flying configurations, at moderate angles of attack α
    7. 2.7. Definitions and properties of the thin and thick-symmetrical components of the thick, lifting flying configurations
    8. 2.8. The disturbance regions produced by a moving point in subsonic and supersonic flow
    9. 2.9. Disturbance regions and characteristic surfaces produced by triangular wings, in supersonic flow
    10. 2.10. Disturbance regions and characteristic surfaces produced by trapezoidal wings, in supersonic flow
    11. 2.11. Disturbance regions and characteristic surfaces produced by rectangular wings, in supersonic flow
    12. 2.12. The boundary value problems for the axial disturbance velocities on thin and thick-symmetrical wedged triangular wing components, in supersonic flow
    13. 2.13. Conclusions
  11. Chapter 3: Computation of Axial Disturbance Velocities on Wedged Wings, in Supersonic Flow, at NSL’s Edge
    1. 3.1. General considerations
    2. 3.2. The conical flow of first order
    3. 3.3. The boundary conditions for the wedged triangular wings, in the Germain’s plane
    4. 3.4. The solutions of direct boundary value problems for U and U* on wedged triangular wing components
    5. 3.5. The complex axial disturbance velocities U and U* on the wedged triangular wing components
    6. 3.6. The axial disturbance velocities u and u* on the wedged delta wing components
    7. 3.7. The axial disturbance velocities u and u* on the wedged trapezoidal wing components
    8. 3.8. The axial disturbance velocities u and u* on the wedged rectangular wing components
    9. 3.9. Conclusions
  12. Chapter 4: Computation of Axial Disturbance Velocities on Flying Configurations with Arbitrary Shapes, in Supersonic Flow, at NSL’s Edge
    1. 4.1. General considerations
    2. 4.2. The theory of high conical flow of nth order
    3. 4.3. The principle of minimal singularities for the high conical flow of nth order
    4. 4.4. The solutions of boundary value problems of fictitious complex potentials Ff and Ff*, on triangular wings
    5. 4.5. The axial disturbance velocities on the thin and thick-symmetrical triangular wings with arbitrary shapes
    6. 4.6. The axial disturbance velocities on delta wings with arbitrary shapes
    7. 4.7. The axial disturbance velocities on trapezoidal wings with arbitrary shapes
    8. 4.8. The axial disturbance velocities on rectangular wings with arbitrary shapes
    9. 4.9. The axial disturbance velocities on non-integrated or integrated delta wing-fuselage configurations
    10. 4.10. The axial disturbance velocities on non-integrated or integrated delta wing-fuselage configurations with movable leading edge flaps
    11. 4.11. Determination of the constants of axial disturbance velocities on flying configurations
    12. 4.12. Conclusions
  13. Chapter 5: The Aerodynamical Characteristics of Flying Configurations with Arbitrary Shapes, in Supersonic Flow
    1. 5.1. General considerations
    2. 5.2. The computation of the aerodynamical characteristics of the delta wings
    3. 5.3. The computation of the aerodynamical characteristics of delta wing-fuselage configurations
    4. 5.4. The computation of the aerodynamical characteristics of delta wing-fuselage configurations, fitted with leading edge flaps, in open positions
    5. 5.5. The computation of the lift, pitching moment and drag coefficients of the rectangular wings
    6. 5.6. Conclusions
  14. Chapter 6: The Visualizations of the Surfaces of Pressure Coefficients and Aerodynamical Characteristics of Wedged Delta and Wedged Rectangular Wings, in Supersonic Flow
    1. 6.1. Introduction
    2. 6.2. The three-dimensional visualizations of the Cp-surfaces on the LAF’s wedged delta wing, in supersonic flow
    3. 6.3. Visualizations of the behaviors of the Cp-surfaces on a wedged delta wing, by crossing of sonic lines
    4. 6.4. Visualizations of the surfaces of lift and pitching moment coefficients of LAF’s wedged delta wing and of their asymptotical behaviors, by crossing of sonic lines
    5. 6.5. The visualization of the inviscid drag coefficient’s surface of the LAF’s wedged delta wing and of its asymptotical behavior, by crossing of sonic lines
    6. 6.6. The polar surface of the LAF’s wedged delta wing and its asymptotical behavior, by crossing of sonic lines
    7. 6.7. The visualizations of the Cp-surfaces on the LAF’s wedged rectangular wing
    8. 6.8. The behaviors of the Cp-surfaces by changing of the LAF’s wedged rectangular wing from long to short, at ν = 1
    9. 6.9. The three-dimensional visualizations of surfaces of aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s wedged rectangular wing
    10. 6.10. The polar surface of the LAF’s wedged rectangular wing, in supersonic flow
    11. 6.11. Conclusions
  15. Chapter 7: Qualitative Analysis of the NSL’s Asymptotical Behaviors in the Vicinity of its Critical Zones
    1. 7.1. Introduction
    2. 7.2. Reduction of quadratical, elliptical and hyperbolical algebraic equations to their canonical forms
    3. 7.3. The asymptotical behaviors of quadratical algebraic equations with variable free term
    4. 7.4. The qualitative analysis of elliptical and hyperbolical, quadratical, algebraic equations with variable coefficients of free and linear terms
    5. 7.5. The Jacobi determinant and the Jacobi hypersurface
    6. 7.6. The aerodynamical applications of the qualitative analysis of the QAEs
    7. 7.7. Conclusions
  16. Chapter 8: Computation of the Friction Drag Coefficients of the Flying Configurations
    1. 8.1. Introduction
    2. 8.2. Computation of the inviscid lateral velocity v, at the NSL’s edge
    3. 8.3. The coupling between the NSL’s slopes and the velocity field
    4. 8.4. Computation of friction and total drag coefficients of the delta wings
    5. 8.5. Conclusions
  17. Chapter 9: Inviscid and Viscous Aerodynamical Global Optimal Design
    1. 9.1. Introduction
    2. 9.2. The optimum–optimorum theory
    3. 9.3. Inviscid aerodynamical global optimal design, via optimum–optimorum theory
    4. 9.4. Inviscid aerodynamic global optimal design of delta wing model ADELA, via optimum–optimorum theory
    5. 9.5. Inviscid aerodynamic global optimal design of fully-integrated wing/fuselage models FADET I and FADET II
    6. 9.6. The iterative optimum–optimorum theory and the viscous aerodynamical optimal design
    7. 9.7. Proposal for a fully-optimized and fully-integrated Catamaran STA
    8. 9.8. Conclusions
  18. Chapter 10: Comparison of the Theoretical Aerodynamical Characteristics of Wing Models with Experimental-Determined Results
    1. 10.1. Introduction
    2. 10.2. The aims of the experimental program
    3. 10.3. Determination of experimental-correlated values of aerodynamical characteristics and of interpolated values of pressure coefficient
    4. 10.4. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s wedged delta wing model with experimental results
    5. 10.5. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s double wedged delta wing model with experimental results
    6. 10.6. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s wedged delta wing model, fitted with a conical fuselage, with experimental results
    7. 10.7. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s fully-optimized delta wing model ADELA with experimental results
    8. 10.8. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamical characteristics of LAF’s wedged rectangular wing model with experimental results
    9. 10.9. Comparison of theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of LAF’s cambered rectangular wing model with experimental results
    10. 10.10. Conclusions
  19. Final Remarks
  20. Outlook
  21. Author Index
  22. Subject Index