You are previewing Composing Music with Computers.
O'Reilly logo
Composing Music with Computers

Book Description

Focuses on the role of the computer as a generative tool for music composition. Miranda introduces a number of computer music composition techniques ranging from probabilities, formal grammars and fractals, to genetic algorithms, cellular automata and neural computation. Anyone wishing to use the computer as a companion to create music will find this book a valuable resource. As a comprehensive guide with full explanations of technical terms, it is suitable for students, professionals and enthusiasts alike.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Series introduction
  7. Foreword
  8. Preface
  9. 1 Computer music: facing the facts
    1. 1.1 Abstraction boundaries
    2. 1.2 Time-domain hierarchies
      1. 1.2.1 The domain of immediate perception: timbre
      2. 1.2.2 The domain of frequency
      3. 1.2.3 The domain of pulse
      4. 1.2.4 The domain of form
    3. 1.3 Approaching composition
      1. 1.3.1 Top-down versus bottom-up
      2. 1.3.2 Interface modelling
      3. 1.3.3 Parametrical thinking
    4. 1.4 Cognitive archetypes
      1. 1.4.1 Metaphorical associations
      2. 1.4.2 Elementary schemes
    5. 1.5 Concluding remarks
  10. 2 Preparing the ground
    1. 2.1 Elementary discrete mathematics
      1. 2.1.1 Algebraic modelling
      2. 2.1.2 Graph-based modelling
    2. 2.2 Fundamentals of set theory
      1. 2.2.1 Set operations
      2. 2.2.2 Set algebra
      3. 2.2.3 Selection and combination
    3. 2.3 Basics of logic
    4. 2.4 Introduction to matrices
    5. 2.5 The basics of formal grammars
      1. 2.5.1 Regular grammars and finite state automata
    6. 2.6 Brief introduction to probabilities
    7. 2.7 A primer in computer programming
      1. 2.7.1 Encapsulated subroutines
      2. 2.7.2 Path selection
      3. 2.7.3 Iteration
      4. 2.7.4 Passing data between subroutines
      5. 2.7.5 Data structures
      6. 2.7.6 A musical example
    8. 2.8 The legacy of The Second Viennese School
    9. 2.9 The legacy of formalised music
  11. 3 Probabilities, grammars and automata
    1. 3.1 Probabilities
      1. 3.1.1 Distribution functions
    2. 3.2 Probability tables
    3. 3.3 Markov chains
      1. 3.3.1 Mathematical properties of Markov chains
      2. 3.3.2 Generating note streams
      3. 3.3.3 Random walk processes
    4. 3.4 Formal grammars
      1. 3.4.1 A brief introduction to formal grammars
      2. 3.4.2 An example of a grammar for music composition
    5. 3.5 Finite state automata
    6. 3.6 Related software on the accompanying CD-ROM
  12. 4 Iterative algorithms: chaos and fractals
    1. 4.1 Iterative processes
      1. 4.1.1 The musical potential of iterative processes
    2. 4.2 Fractal geometry
      1. 4.2.1 The Sierpinski gasket
      2. 4.2.2 The Mandelbrot set
      3. 4.2.3 Creating fractal musical forms
    3. 4.3 Related software on the accompanying CD-ROM
  13. 5 Neural computation and music
    1. 5.1 Thinking music aloud
    2. 5.2 Artificial neural networks
      1. 5.2.1 Understanding the brain
      2. 5.2.2 Building artificial neural networks
      3. 5.2.3 Training the network
    3. 5.3 Musical networks
    4. 5.4 Related software on the accompanying CD-ROM
  14. 6 Evolutionary music: breaking new ground
    1. 6.1 Cellular automata
      1. 6.1.1 Game of Life
      2. 6.1.2 Demon Cyclic Space
      3. 6.1.3 A cellular automata musical engine
    2. 6.2 Genetic algorithms
      1. 6.2.1 Codification methods
      2. 6.2.2 Selection mechanisms
      3. 6.2.3 Growing musical organisms
    3. 6.3 Adaptive musical games
      1. 6.3.1 A shot in the dark: Where does music comes from?
      2. 6.3.2 Evolutionary music modelling
    4. 6.4 Evolving rhythmic forms
      1. 6.4.1 The anatomy of the agents
      2. 6.4.2 The cognitive module’s knowledge
      3. 6.4.3 The memorisation of rhythmic patterns
      4. 6.4.4 Examples
      5. 6.4.5 Concluding remarks
    5. 6.5 Related software on the accompanying CD-ROM
  15. 7 Case studies
    1. 7.1 From content to form
      1. 7.1.1 The combinatorial module
      2. 7.1.2 Sequencing the chords
      3. 7.1.3 The moulding rules
    2. 7.2 From form to content
    3. 7.3 Phonetic grounding
      1. 7.3.1 Formants and timbre
      2. 7.3.2 Understanding the vocal mechanism
      3. 7.3.3 Associating cause and effect
      4. 7.3.4 Synthesising formants
      5. 7.3.5 Classifying phonetic timbres
      6. 7.3.6 Towards grounded musical systems
    4. 7.4 Final remarks
  16. 8 Music composition software on the accompanying CD-ROM
    1. 8.1 A programming language for algorithmic composition: Nyquist
    2. 8.2 Visual programming: OpenMusic
    3. 8.3 Intelligent riff blocks: Music Sketcher
    4. 8.4 Hybrid approach: Tangent
    5. 8.5 Internet: the SSEYO Koan system
    6. 8.6 Grammars and constraints: Bol Processor
    7. 8.7 Aleatory music and probabilities: Texture
    8. 8.8 Number theory: MusiNum
    9. 8.9 Iterative algorithms: a Music Generator
    10. 8.10 Fractals: FractMus
    11. 8.11 Cellular automata: CAMUS
    12. 8.12 Genetic algorithms: Vox Populi
    13. 8.13 Selective automata: Harmony Seeker
    14. 8.14 Brain interface: IBVA system
    15. 8.15 Algorithmic but live: M
  17. Epilogue
  18. Appendix 1 Excerpt from J. S. Bach’s Chorale BWV 668
  19. Appendix 2 Musical clip
  20. Appendix 3 Formant chart
  21. Appendix 4 A primer in Lisp programming
  22. References
  23. CD-ROM instructions
  24. Index