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Competitive Intelligence and Decision Problems

Book Description

The development of a research, teaching, or application of competitive (economic) intelligence requires a strategic and transverse vision in regards to related issues. It is essential to integrate the role of culture when interpreting results, either from the training of a specialist or in respect to a country or region. The authors of this book, members of an expert group supported by the CNRS in France, bring all of their talents together to create a comprehensive book that does just this and more.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Part 1: Models and Tools
    1. Chapter 1: Model Use: From a Decision-Making Problem to a Set of Research Problems
      1. 1.1. Introduction: why model?
      2. 1.2. General presentation of the Watcher Information Search Problem model
      3. 1.3. Dimensions and aspects of the model
      4. 1.4. Description of model elements
        1. 1.4.1. Elements describing the decision problem and its context
        2. 1.4.2. Chosen solutions and the final decision
        3. 1.4.3. Supporting elements of the information problem
        4. 1.4.4. Demand, stakes, and context
        5. 1.4.5. Information indicators
        6. 1.4.6. Elements of research problems
        7. 1.4.7. Analysis and presentation of results
        8. 1.4.8. Common parameters for all model elements
        9. 1.4.9. Knowledge building through annotation
      5. 1.5. Conclusion: toward flexibility in the model
      6. 1.6. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 2: Analytical Tools for Competitive Intelligence: from Data Collection to Data Processing
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Overview of the multidimensional analysis model
        1. 2.2.1. Information process
        2. 2.2.2. Process architecture
      3. 2.3. Application of the multidimensional analysis model
        1. 2.3.1. Preliminary data
        2. 2.3.2. Data visualization
      4. 2.4. Conclusion
      5. 2.5. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 3: The Synergy of Knowledge Management and Competitive Intelligence
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. Theoretical context
        1. 3.2.1. Definitions of knowledge
          1. 3.2.1.1. Types of knowledge
        2. 3.2.2. Competitive intelligence
        3. 3.2.3. KM in CI
          1. 3.2.3.1. A generic model for CM: application to industrial systems
          2. 3.2.3.2. KC in an equipment repair and diagnostics system
          3. 3.2.3.3. Knowledge acquisition and modeling for CM: lessons learned
          4. 3.2.3.4. Software engineering for KC using CBR: case structure
          5. 3.2.3.5. Information security systems and KM
          6. 3.2.3.6. Business process modeling through KM
          7. 3.2.3.7. KM: planning for the future
          8. 3.2.3.8. KM in industry and government: security versus sharing
          9. 3.2.3.9. KC in research and design projects: an integrated and diversified approach
          10. 3.2.3.10. Overview: classification of works
          11. 3.2.3.11. Evaluation criteria for methodologies
          12. 3.2.3.12. Application evaluation criteria
          13. 3.2.3.13. Evaluation criteria based on principles
          14. 3.2.3.14. Summary of evaluation of KM methodologies, principles, and systems
      3. 3.3. Knowledge acquisition strategy
        1. 3.3.1. Action-based knowledge acquisition
      4. 3.4. Formalization of knowledge
        1. 3.4.1. KC structure for CI projects
        2. 3.4.2. Architecture for KM in CI projects
          1. 3.4.2.1. Case study of a DP: moral decadence among young people
            1. 3.4.2.1.1. Scenario
          2. 3.4.2.2. Action-based knowledge use
      5. 3.5. Conclusion
      6. 3.6. Appendices
        1. 3.6.1. Appendix A: knowledge acquisition based on actor activities
        2. 3.6.2. Appendix B: capitalization scenario in decision making
      7. 3.7. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 4: Collaborative Information Seeking in the Competitive Intelligence Process
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. The CI process
      3. 4.3. From information retrieval to CIR
        1. 4.3.1. Information retrieval
        2. 4.3.2. Collaborative information behavior
        3. 4.3.3. CIS and retrieval
          1. 4.3.3.1. Domain knowledge
          2. 4.3.3.2. Competence in search methodology
          3. 4.3.3.3. System knowledge
          4. 4.3.3.4. Knowledge of information sources
          5. 4.3.3.5. Knowledge of collaborators
      4. 4.4. Facilitation and management of CIS
        1. 4.4.1. The conceptual framework
          1. 4.4.1.1. Communication
          2. 4.4.1.2. Modes of collaboration
          3. 4.4.1.3. Coordination of user interactions
          4. 4.4.1.4. Managing knowledge in collaboration
        2. 4.4.2. Communication model for CIS
          1. 4.4.2.1. User
          2. 4.4.2.2. Object
          3. 4.4.2.3. Context
        3. 4.4.3. Application context
      5. 4.5. Collective information seeking scenario
      6. 4.6. Conclusion
      7. 4.7. Bibliography
    5. Chapter 5: Study of Risk Factors in Competitive Intelligence Decision Making: A Cognitive Approach
      1. 5.1. Decision making and decision problems
        1. 5.1.1. Introduction
        2. 5.1.2. Fundamental aspects of the decision problem
        3. 5.1.3. Decision and cognitive capacity
        4. 5.1.4. Decisions in the context of CI
      2. 5.2. Risks and RFs in CI
        1. 5.2.1. Introduction
        2. 5.2.2. Actors and their interactions in CI
        3. 5.2.3. Risks and RFs
      3. 5.3. Cognitive capacity, a risk, and decision factor
        1. 5.3.1. Introduction
        2. 5.3.2. Cognitive capacity and its effects on decision making
        3. 5.3.3. Cognitive model of RFs
      4. 5.4. Conclusion
      5. 5.5. Bibliography
    6. Chapter 6: Multimedia Information Seeking Through Competitive Intelligence Process
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. The two dimensions of CI: decisions and information
      3. 6.3. Multimedia information: between complexity and accessibility
      4. 6.4. The information seeking process: an overview of paradigmatic evolution
      5. 6.5. Actors involved in information seeking processes and problem solving
        1. 6.5.1. Terminology: the notion of the user
        2. 6.5.2. Terminology: the notion of use
      6. 6.6. Applying a user-centered approach to facilitate multimedia information seeking
        1. 6.6.1. Multimedia information granulation to support multimedia information seeking processes
        2. 6.6.2. Integration of the representation of the user into the multimedia information retrieval process
          1. 6.6.2.1. Representation of user characteristics
          2. 6.6.2.2. Representation of user knowledge
            1. 6.6.2.2.1. Representation of user knowledge of the system used
            2. 6.6.2.2.2. Representation of user knowledge in the research domain
          3. 6.6.2.3. Representation of user competences
          4. 6.6.2.4. Representation of user preferences
          5. 6.6.2.5. Representation of information needs
            1. 6.6.2.5.1. Awareness of the information need
            2. 6.6.2.5.2. Information needs and knowledge: paradoxal or complementary?
            3. 6.6.2.5.3. Transformation of the information need in the context of information use
      7. 6.7. Conclusion
      8. 6.8. Bibliography
    7. Chapter 7: Strategies for Analyzing Chinese Information Sources from a Competitive Intelligence Perspective
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Chinese scientific information as an essential source of information
      3. 7.3. A global vision of the sector through patent analysis
      4. 7.4. Chinese sources of scientific information
      5. 7.5. Automatic processing of information by bibliometrical analysis of metadata
        1. 7.5.1. Specificities of a Chinese-language corpus
        2. 7.5.2. Analysis and results
        3. 7.5.3. Validation and comparison
      6. 7.6. Conclusion
      7. 7.7. Bibliography
    8. Chapter 8: Generic Tagging Strategy Using a Semio-Contextual Approach to the Corpus for the Creation of Controlled Databases
      1. 8.1. Introduction
      2. 8.2. The adaptive journal concept
        1. 8.2.1. The notion of semantic tagging: selection of relevant information
        2. 8.2.2. Modeling knowledge: organizing relevant information
        3. 8.2.3. Recomposed documents: sorting and presenting relevant information
          1. 8.2.3.1. The extraction—recomposition principle
          2. 8.2.3.2. The decontextualization—recontextualization principle
      3. 8.3. A generic tagging strategy: models using the ASCC
        1. 8.3.1. Categorizing meaning
        2. 8.3.2. The ASCC at the nano-level of information in an adaptive journal
        3. 8.3.3. ASCC at micro-level in an adaptive journal
        4. 8.3.4. ASCC for authors in an adaptive journal
        5. 8.3.5. ASCC at meso-level in an adaptive journal
        6. 8.3.6. ASCC at macro-level in an adaptive journal
      4. 8.4. Conclusion
      5. 8.5. Bibliography
    9. Chapter 9: Design and Development of a Model for Generating and Exploiting Annotation in the Context of Economic Intelligence
      1. 9.1. Introduction
      2. 9.2. Annotation as a concept
      3. 9.3. Annotation in EI
        1. 9.3.1. Annotation for knowledge elicitation
        2. 9.3.2. Annotation in information retrieval
        3. 9.3.3. Annotation as value-added information
        4. 9.3.4. Requirements for annotation model
      4. 9.4. Proposition
        1. 9.4.1. Annotation creation
        2. 9.4.2. Annotation exploitation
      5. 9.5. Annotation model and architectural components
        1. 9.5.1. Annotation schema
        2. 9.5.2. AMTEA architecture
      6. 9.6. Bibliography
    10. Chapter 10: Contribution of Cognitive Sciences to Document Indexing in Scientific, Technical, and Economic Watch for Competitive Intelligence
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Functionality of the PIETRA platform: general presentation
      3. 10.3. Global usage strategy
      4. 10.4. Operation of the platform
        1. 10.4.1. Watch profiles
        2. 10.4.2. The pivot language
          1. 10.4.2.1. Functions
        3. 10.4.3. Memory indexing
        4. 10.4.4. Validation
          1. 10.4.4.1. Phase 3: statistical analysis
          2. 10.4.4.2. Examples of application: example 1
            1. 10.4.4.2.1. Creation of initial corpus
            2. 10.4.4.2.2. Memory indexing (corpus 2)
            3. 10.4.4.2.3. Statistical processing
          3. 10.4.4.3. Example 2
            1. 10.4.4.3.1. Translation into the pivot language
            2. 10.4.4.3.2. Presentation of an extract from the translation of the pivot language
            3. 10.4.4.3.3. Results
      5. 10.5. Elaborated databases
      6. 10.6. Conclusion
      7. 10.7. Bibliography
  5. Part 2: CI and Governance
    1. Chapter 11: Integration of Competitive Intelligence and Watch in an Academic Scientific Research Laboratory
      1. 11.1. Introduction
      2. 11.2. Existing structures in universities and research organizations
      3. 11.3. Research structures, research actors and evaluation in the context of CI integration
      4. 11.4. Clusters and their power of attraction
      5. 11.5. Strategic analysis units, a support for the development of laboratories and of CI
        1. 11.5.1. GICC UMR
        2. 11.5.2. The LSCC: strategic intelligence survey unit
          1. 11.5.2.1. Available facilities
          2. 11.5.2.2. Potential results and user references
          3. 11.5.2.3. Industrial applications in France (extract)
          4. 11.5.2.4. Platform finance
          5. 11.5.2.5. Example: Thailand
      6. 11.6. Conclusion
      7. 11.7. Bibliography
    2. Chapter 12: E-Health and Societal and Territorial Intelligence in France: Collective Knowledge Production Issues and New Network Interface Organizations
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. E-health, the convergence of health issues, and ICT
        1. 12.2.1. Compartmentalization and crisis in health systems
        2. 12.2.2. The development of e-health
        3. 12.2.3. Evolution of medical practice, computerization, and ICT use
      3. 12.3. Toward a new territorialization of healthcare management
        1. 12.3.1. Reorganization of the health system by regionalization
        2. 12.3.2. Affirmation of new organizations of innovative interfaces as sociotechnical forms, projects, and apparatus
      4. 12.4. E-health and CI: societal dimensions and territorial intelligence
        1. 12.4.1. E-health and CI
        2. 12.4.2. The convergence of societal and territorial intelligence: a global intelligence approach to complexity
      5. 12.5. Issues in the production of collective knowledge
        1. 12.5.1. Coordination: the complementarity of information and communication
        2. 12.5.2. Information needs for decision assistance and new tools
        3. 12.5.3. Evolution of professions and new professions
      6. 12.6. Shared information systems at regional level: a step toward societal and territorial information systems with a health component?
        1. 12.6.1. Issues in the construction of regionalized information systems
        2. 12.6.2. Societal and territorial intelligence and building trust between actors around sociotechnical systems
        3. 12.6.3. Collective knowledge production: the core of new governance in the health system
      7. 12.7. Conclusion
      8. 12.8. Bibliography
    3. Chapter 13: Governance and Short-Term Product Development in Clusters — An Example: The FIRE Application
      1. 13.1. Introduction
      2. 13.2. Considerations on the development of clusters
      3. 13.3. Grievances of small businesses and industries
      4. 13.4. The context of the SCS cluster, PACA, France
      5. 13.5. Origins of the FIRE project
        1. 13.5.1. From idea to creation
        2. 13.5.2. Industrial aims of the project
      6. 13.6. From design to creation and commercialization
        1. 13.6.1. General event sequence from an idea to a commercial product
      7. 13.7. Conclusion
      8. 13.8. Bibliography
    4. Chapter 14: Competitive Intelligence and the Development of Corporate Universities
      1. 14.1. Introduction
      2. 14.2. Competitive intelligence
      3. 14.3. Corporate universities
      4. 14.4. The role of CI in the creation of corporate universities
      5. 14.5. Corporate universities and potential domains of action
      6. 14.6. Integrated CI services in corporate universities
      7. 14.7. Conclusion
      8. 14.8. Bibliography
    5. Chapter 15: Emerging Functions for Driving Competitive Intelligence at Regional Level
      1. 15.1. Regional systems for CI
        1. 15.1.1. History
        2. 15.1.2. Definition of regional systems for CI
        3. 15.1.3. System actors
      2. 15.2. Competitiveness clusters
        1. 15.2.1. What is a cluster?
        2. 15.2.2. The contribution of CI to clusters
        3. 15.2.3. Evaluation of centers
        4. 15.2.4. Review of the first phase of cluster support: 2006–2008
        5. 15.2.5. Launch of the second phase of cluster support: 2009–2011
      3. 15.3. Survey of CI systems
        1. 15.3.1. Results of the survey
        2. 15.3.2. Comments
      4. 15.4. The role of coordinator
        1. 15.4.1. Roles and activities of the coordinator
          1. 15.4.1.1. Ten strategic roles of the coordinator
        2. 15.4.2. Competences of the coordinator
      5. 15.5. Conclusion
      6. 15.6. Bibliography
    6. Chapter 16: Attractiveness of Territories and Territorial Intelligence: Indicators
      1. 16.1. Introduction
      2. 16.2. Attractiveness and value of a territory: elements of analysis
        1. 16.2.1. Attractiveness of territories: creating and harnessing value
          1. 16.2.1.1. Using attractiveness to create value
          2. 16.2.1.2. Using attractiveness to harness value
        2. 16.2.2. TI and attractiveness: measuring the value of a territory
      3. 16.3. Attractiveness and implementation of a TI approach
        1. 16.3.1. Territorial attractiveness: comparison of studies on the IDF region
        2. 16.3.2. The participatory method
        3. 16.3.3. Information and attractiveness
      4. 16.4. Conclusion
      5. 16.5. Bibliography
      6. 16.6. Appendix A: grid for territorial analysis by aspect
  6. List of Authors
  7. Index