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Communication Counts: Business Presentations for Busy People

Book Description

Communication Counts differentiates itself from other books on communication, presentation, and media relations because it directly confronts the biggest challenges facing anyone who needs to communicate anything today: listeners’ time constraints and distractions. Written by renowned communications expert Mary Civiello, this detailed book offers a unique “modular” approach that will enable you to say what you need to say, in a way that it can best be heard and remembered, in a time frame that can be suited to any situation.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Acknowledgments
  3. Introduction: BE BRIGHT, BE BRIEF, BE GONE
  4. I. A WORD IN EDGEWISE
    1. 1. Your Lips Are Moving ... but Is Anyone Listening?
      1. 1.1. The Forgetting Curve
      2. 1.2. Did Someone Say Stress?
      3. 1.3. The Myth of the Captive Audience
      4. 1.4. The Forgetting Curve's Silver Lining
      5. 1.5. Essential Elements of Speaking
      6. 1.6. Even the Best Can Blunder
      7. 1.7. The Message Tripod
    2. 2. message in a Module
      1. 2.1. Simply Seven: Message Module Categories
      2. 2.2. Connecting the Dots: A Case Study of Seven Simple Modules
      3. 2.3. Train Your Brain to Think in Modules
    3. 3. The Fear Factor
      1. 3.1. Yikes! The Physical Aspect of Speaker's Fear
      2. 3.2. What Will They Think of Me? The Cognitive Aspect of Speaker's Fear
        1. 3.2.1. The Sharp Pencil Makes a Point
        2. 3.2.2. Details, Details: Believability Begins with Proof
        3. 3.2.3. Flexibility Builds Likeability
        4. 3.2.4. Drawing a Blank
      3. 3.3. Fear of Fear Itself
        1. 3.3.1. Remember Good History, Not Bad
        2. 3.3.2. Write It Down
      4. 3.4. The Eighth Module
  5. II. MESSAGE BOOT CAMP
    1. 4. Audience the "what's in it for me?" principle
      1. 4.1. Is Anyone Here but Me? Overlooking or Misunderstanding the Audience
      2. 4.2. WIIFM: What's In It for Me?
      3. 4.3. Audience Always Matters: Show Your Respect
      4. 4.4. Do Your Due Diligence for WIIFM
      5. 4.5. An Audience of One: Matching Modules to Decision Styles
    2. 5. Substance What's your headline?
      1. 5.1. Ignoring the Elephant: Three Reasons People Miss Their Headline
      2. 5.2. Writing Your Headline: Finding the "Aha"
      3. 5.3. Think Like an Ad Writer
      4. 5.4. What to Avoid in a Headline
      5. 5.5. Linking Your Headline to Other Modules
      6. 5.6. Headline Study: A Public Relations Director
      7. 5.7. Freshening Your Headline
      8. 5.8. The Solutions
    3. 6. Style "v" is for ... visual, vocal, and verbal
      1. 6.1. "V" #1: Visual Elements
        1. 6.1.1. Making Your Entrance
        2. 6.1.2. Smile ... at Least for a While
        3. 6.1.3. Look Them in the Eye
        4. 6.1.4. Move It!
        5. 6.1.5. Gestures: The Right Kind in the Right Amount
      2. 6.2. "V" #2: Vocal Elements
        1. 6.2.1. Volume: The Art of Ups and Downs
        2. 6.2.2. Pacing: Don't Race, Don't Dawdle
        3. 6.2.3. Tone and Pitch: Emotional Cues and Clues
      3. 6.3. "V" #3: Verbal Elements
        1. 6.3.1. Avoid Lockstep Rhetoric
        2. 6.3.2. Call a Spade a Spade
        3. 6.3.3. The Cool Rule
      4. 6.4. Variety: The Spice of Speaking
    4. 7. Time Sense the lincoln legacy
      1. 7.1. Our Patience Is Thinning
      2. 7.2. Cut to the Chase
      3. 7.3. Jolt So They Don't Bolt
      4. 7.4. Time Your Modules, Adjust as Needed
      5. 7.5. Overtime Is a Crime
  6. III. PRESENTATION SITUATIONS
    1. 8. Hold That Elevator the one-minute message
      1. 8.1. Be Ready with a Boilerplate
      2. 8.2. "Got a Minute?" Keep It Conversational
      3. 8.3. Respecting Boundaries: Moments Not to Seize the Moment
      4. 8.4. First Minute, First Impression
    2. 9. Meeting Modules the meeting meat without the fat
      1. 9.1. The Five-Minute Formula: Meeting Meat without the Fat
      2. 9.2. Meeting Jousts: Disarming Your Challengers
      3. 9.3. Back Pocket Modules
        1. 9.3.1. Know Who's Across the Table
        2. 9.3.2. Meeting with Style
    3. 10. Main Attraction Modules
      1. 10.1. Kitchen Sinks Not Required—Just the Garbage Disposal
      2. 10.2. Creating Your Modules in Order
      3. 10.3. Coming Up with a Context Module
      4. 10.4. Creating a Catchy Signpost
      5. 10.5. Proof Positive: Finding Facts, Analogies, and Anecdotes
        1. 10.5.1. About Facts
        2. 10.5.2. About Analogies
        3. 10.5.3. About Anecdotes
      6. 10.6. Rehearsing for Long Presentations
      7. 10.7. Cutting It Short?
    4. 11. The Power to Cure PowerPoint and Master Other Visual Aids
      1. 11.1. PowerPoint: Use It; Don't Be Used by It
      2. 11.2. Slide Content: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
      3. 11.3. Talk Back to Me: Visuals as a Road to Interactivity
      4. 11.4. Should You Go with Video?
      5. 11.5. The Art of the Flip Chart
      6. 11.6. The Power of Props
      7. 11.7. Another Visual Aid Is You!
    5. 12. "That's a Good Question" handling q&a
      1. 12.1. Prepare to A the Qs!
      2. 12.2. Don't Just Take Questions—Ask Them
      3. 12.3. Facing the Tough Questions
      4. 12.4. Handling Difficult Audience Members
      5. 12.5. The Sound of Silence
    6. 13. Sharing the Stage panels and team presentations
      1. 13.1. Team Talk: A Resonant Symphony
      2. 13.2. Team Style, Team Spirit
      3. 13.3. Panel Presentations: Mixing It Up
    7. 14. A Moveable Feast presenting to international audiences
      1. 14.1. Know Before You Go: Ask Who, What, and How?
      2. 14.2. Tips for the Traveling Presenter
  7. IV. MANAGING YOUR MEDIA MOMENT
    1. 15. Reporters and Those They Report To
      1. 15.1. Remember Who's Watching, Remember Who's Reading
      2. 15.2. Reporters Are Different
        1. 15.2.1. Curious/Suspicious
        2. 15.2.2. Audacious Questioners
        3. 15.2.3. Plain Folks and Populists
        4. 15.2.4. Good at Getting You Comfortable
        5. 15.2.5. Slippery
        6. 15.2.6. Quick, Intelligent Generalists
      3. 15.3. Research Your Reporter
      4. 15.4. No Press Bashing, Please
    2. 16. Making Your Message the Story
      1. 16.1. The Wrong and Winding Road to Media Prep
        1. 16.1.1. Don't Go When You Don't Know
      2. 16.2. The Right Prep, the ROI Prep
      3. 16.3. Modules for Media
        1. 16.3.1. The Headline: Keep It Simple
        2. 16.3.2. Context: Keep It Brief
        3. 16.3.3. Three Message Points and Proofs: Dress Them Up Before You Take Them Out
        4. 16.3.4. The Summary: Soooo ... Anything Else?
      4. 16.4. Media Question Control: Softballs
      5. 16.5. Media Question Control: Hardballs
      6. 16.6. Handling the Ambush
    3. 17. Serve It with Spice
      1. 17.1. Loosen Up, Lighten Up
        1. 17.1.1. Project Energy, Gesture, and Smile
        2. 17.1.2. Jettison the Jargon
        3. 17.1.3. Stay Natural, No Matter What
        4. 17.1.4. Never Mirror a Reporter's Mood
      2. 17.2. Controlling the Picture
        1. 17.2.1. What's on Display?
        2. 17.2.2. What's Your Context?
        3. 17.2.3. A Word on Wardrobe
        4. 17.2.4. Go to the Videotape
    4. 18. Making the Most of Your Moment
      1. 18.1. Tick Tock ... Top Time Mistakes
      2. 18.2. The Print Article: Size Matters
      3. 18.3. The TV Interview: "And Now for a Break ..."
      4. 18.4. New Media: Is YouTube for You?
  8. V. A LAST WORD
    1. 19. Oh No! Dealing with Worst-Case Scenarios
      1. 19.1. Equipment: Tackling Technology Terrors
      2. 19.2. The Room: If Your Space Is a Disgrace
      3. 19.3. People Problems: You're Only Human ... and So Is Your Audience
      4. 19.4. Final Thoughts ...
  9. 20. About the Authors