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Cocoa® by Richard Wentk

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Chapter 4: Getting Started with Xcode

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In This Chapter

Getting ready for Xcode

Installing Xcode

Creating a new OS X project

Exploring Xcode's windows

In theory, Objective-C is as platform-independent as C++, Java, Ruby, and Python. In practice, it isn't. Most developers write code that combines the features of Objective-C and Cocoa, using them as an informal blended language that runs almost exclusively on Apple hardware. Only one toolkit supports this approach — Apple's Xcode SDK (software development kit).

Xcode includes dedicated class and object management features that aren't available in other environments. Developers rely on these features to add new classes to their applications and to define the list of objects that's loaded when an application runs. While it's possible to create working Objective-C code with a text editor and a command-line compiler, this isn't an efficient way to work. It doesn't take advantage of the helper features in Xcode, which make it easier to work with Cocoa objects.

The next few chapters introduce Cocoa object creation and class management in a theoretical way using working example code created in Xcode and Interface Builder. They also outline ...

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