Cover by Brian Carper, Christophe Grand, Chas Emerick

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Tooling

Because of the complexity and verbosity of Java, “Java tooling” has always implied the use of truly Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) like Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA: extensive code completion, refactoring, class hierarchy visualization, and other features aren’t just niceties, they are hard requirements for most Java programmers. In contrast, dynamic programming languages (including Python and Ruby) generally demand only a capable text editor and a command prompt. Most Clojure programmers hew closer to the latter model,[313] with one key difference: while a capable text editor is a must, having access to a Clojure REPL—preferably well-integrated into one’s editor and other facilities—is at least as important, if not more so.

Thankfully, accomplishing this is a straightforward task, and so reasonable Clojure support is available for a variety of popular editors (like Emacs, vim, TextMate, jEdit, and so on) as well as IDEs (like Eclipse, Intellij IDEA, and NetBeans). Getting started with any of these options is fairly easy;[314] all other things being equal, we recommend using the tools you’re already most comfortable with and that fit best into your existing style and workflow.[315] To give you some starting point for comparison, we’ll briefly give an overview of the Clojure support provided by the two most popular tools used in the community that each represent orthogonal approaches to Clojure tooling (and tooling in general, perhaps): Eclipse and Emacs.

First, let’s ...

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