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Circuit Analysis For Dummies by John Santiago

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Chapter 9

Dependent Sources and the Transistors That Involve Them

In This Chapter

arrow Working with linear dependent sources

arrow Analyzing circuits that have dependent sources

arrow Taking control with transistors

Resistors, capacitors, and inductors are interesting, but they’re merely passive devices. What makes circuits great is the ability to perform as an electronic switch or amplify signals. Such switching and amplification functions are derived from transistors — transfer resistors — named for the fact that the resistance can be electronically tuned.

Most portable electronic devices, such as smartphones and tablets, use integrated circuits (ICs) to drive many system and circuit functions — making it possible for you to watch the latest YouTube sensation on the go. An IC is usually made on a small wafer of silicon or other semiconductor material holding hundreds to millions of transistors, resistors, and capacitors. In the future, gazillions of transistors, capacitors, and resistors could be jammed into a piece of silicon to perform other functions, like making coffee, getting your favorite newspaper, driving you to work, and waking you up to the reality of doing circuit analysis.

In this ...

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